New Social Science

Criminology Profile (300.A1)

Also known as Sciences humaines – Profil criminologie

💭 THIS PROGRAM IS FOR YOU IF…

  • You like to discuss, debate, and express your opinions 
  • You are interested in current events
  • You are interested in human realities and the challenges facing humanity
  • You want to think about solutions for the challenges facing humanity
  • You want to go to university
  • You like different perspectives and want to learn more about the disciplines of ancient civilizations, history, geography, economics, political science, psychology, and sociology
  • You would like to do a cross-cultural project

Program Description

 

The Social Science Program is an exciting pre-university program that provides students with a balanced education involving general and scientific learning in a variety of disciplines, thereby making it possible for them to understand and analyze human realities. This training will equip students with the necessary knowledge, regardless of profile, to pursue university studies in 100s of different programs (certain prerequisite courses may be required).  

 

Students may choose from one of five profiles: Criminology, Psychology and Society, Commerce, Global Studies, and Sports and Leisure.

 

The Psychology and Society, Commerce, Global Studies with Math, and Sports and Leisure with Math Profiles are all linked to specific university prerequisites and are intended to prepare students for those particular fields of study.

Profile Description

 

This profile provides students with the opportunity to study issues and challenges related to crime and criminal behaviour from the perspective of the law, the individual, and society. All students in this Profile take four common enrichment courses that support the theme: Archives on Trial, Psychology and Crime, Criminal Justice, and the Sociology of Deviance and Crime. 

 

Students have the option to take one introductory-level course in Ancient Civilizations, Business Administration, or Geography which will serve as a pre-requisite for the optional enrichment-level course in semester 3. 

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Overview

PREREQUISITES

Secondary 4 Cultural, Social and Technical Mathematics Option
OR
Mathematics 416

 

OBJECTIVES

 

By the end of the Social Science program, students will be able to: 

  • Explain human realities by using the main facts, concepts, theories, models, and approaches specific to the social science disciplines; 
  • Examine various issues related to citizenship in today’s world; 
  • Use academic work tools and methods as well as the technology needed to successfully pursue their studies; 
  • Demonstrate scientific intellect and intellectual curiosity, and think critically; 
  • Experiment with social science research methods; 
  • Convey their ideas in a clear and organized manner in the language of instruction and use information resources in their second language in the context of their social science studies; 
  • Demonstrate that the subject-specific and methodological learning required to study human realities has been integrated. 

PROGRAM GRID ➡️ Certificate Holders

Total courses: 29
Total credits: 58

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge    300-100-LE 
Introduction to History  330-010-LE
Introduction to Political Science 385-010-LE
Introduction to Sociology 387-010-LE
Physical Education 101 or 102  109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ 
Introduction to College English  603-101-MQ
French – General   602-MQ
Complementary  Course  

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods 300-010-LE 
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics 383-010-LE  
Introduction to Psychology  350-010-LE 
Introduction option of choice*
English for Social Science   603-BEK-LE
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or  
109-102-MQ
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application 345-101-MQ 

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis 360-010-LE 
Thematic Issue (choice) 300-E01-LE to 300-E07-LE
Criminal Justice  385-E01-LE
Sociology of Deviance and Crime 387-E01-LE
Enrichment option of choice** 
Humanities – World Views  345-102-MQ
Literary Genres or 
Literary Themes
603-102-MQ  or 603-103-MQ
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle   109-103-MQ

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE
Psychology and Crime 350-E02-LE 
Archives on Trial 330-E08-LE
Humanities – Ethical Issues 345-BE
French – Specific  602-BE
Literary Genres or 
Literary Themes  
603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ
Complementary Course  

* In the first year, students in the Criminology Profile select ONE Social Science introduction level option from Geography, Business Administration, and Ancient Civilizations.

 

**In the second year, students select ONE enrichment level Social Science course from disciplines opened in the first year with a maximum of two second-level courses from any one discipline.

PROGRAM GRID ➡️ Non-Certificate Holders

Total courses: 29
Total credits: 58

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge    300-100-LE 
Introduction to History  330-010-LE
Introduction to Political Science 385-010-LE
Introduction to Sociology 387-010-LE
Physical Education 101 or 102  109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ 
Introduction to College English  603-101-MQ
Oeuvres narratives et écriture 602-UF0-MQ
Complementary  Course  

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods 300-010-LE 
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics 383-010-LE  
Introduction to Psychology  350-010-LE 
Introduction option of choice*
English for Social Science   603-BEK-LE
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or  
109-102-MQ
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application 345-101-MQ 

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis 360-010-LE 
Thematic Issue (choice) 300-E01-LE to 300-E07-LE
Criminal Justice  385-E01-LE
Sociology of Deviance and Crime 387-E01-LE
Enrichment option of choice** 
Humanities – World Views  345-102-MQ
Literary Genres or 
Literary Themes
603-102-MQ  or 603-103-MQ
Poésie, théâtre et écriture   602-UF1-MQ

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE
Psychology and Crime 350-E02-LE 
Archives on Trial 330-E08-LE
Humanities – Ethical Issues 345-BE
Comparaison d’oeuvres littéraires 602-UF2-MQ
Literary Genres or 
Literary Themes  
603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle 109-103-MQ

COURSES

Methodology and Integration Courses
300-100-LE Academic Skills and Knowledge (2-1-2) 45 HRS / 1 1/2 CR

This course is designed to teach students the fundamental academic skills of researching, reading, and writing in the social sciences. Students are taught how to search for, comprehend and synthesize academic sources in the context of social science research. Throughout this process, they will recognize the various disciplinary perspectives that compose the social sciences and their respective perspectives on a diversity of topics. As they progress through the course, students will gain skills related to searching academic databases, critical evaluation of information, teamwork, academic writing, and oral communication. 

300-010-LE Qualitative Methods (2-2-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to teach students how to distinguish between scientific and non-scientific knowledge, to learn about basic ethics in social science research, to work in teams, to apply a scientific approach to knowledge in the social sciences, and to understand the limits of social science research. They will be introduced to a variety of qualitative approaches used in the social sciences. Using qualitative tools, they will collect, analyze, and interpret data. Students will put into practice qualitative approaches to social science research and will produce a research report that documents their methods and results.  

360-010-LE Quantitative Analysis (2-2-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to teach students to use statistical tools to process and describe data related to the field of social sciences. Students are taught a number of statistical and data collection techniques to understand the possibilities and limitations of quantitative analysis. Learning these statistical techniques will help students to describe and interpret human realities. 

300-400-LE Integrative Course (1-3-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to demonstrate an integration of what students have learned in the social sciences. Within the scope of the course, students will carry out a major original project, such as an academic research paper or equivalent major assignment. This project will integrate the perspectives of three social science disciplines and will involve sharing results with others. Students will also critically reflect on the effects of their social science training on their role as student and citizen. 

Thematic Issue Courses
300-E01-LE The Environment (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores issues in the environment demonstrating both the topical importance of the environment, as well as the interconnectedness of disciplines across the social sciences. This course is designed to equip students with a critical perspective on the roles of individuals and communities in shaping the environment, leading to an appreciation of the way they perceive the world and their place in it. 

300-E02-LE Indigenous Realities (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores the realities of Indigenous peoples in North America and around the world through a variety of academic perspectives. Each discipline may offer a perspective in tandem with one or more other disciplines, demonstrating their interconnectedness across the social sciences. This course will investigate the lived experiences of Indigenous peoples, as well as the impacts of colonialism in its myriad forms. 

300-E03-LE Media and Technology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Using a variety of academic perspectives, this course explores issues related to media in society as well as the broader topic of technology. Students will analyze the role and power of technologies and media in society, building on multiple disciplines in the social sciences. This course is designed to equip students with media literacy skills and a critical perspective on science and communication, leading to a reflection on their own position as citizens, consumers, and producers of culture. 

300-E04-LE Globalization (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course explores issues of Globalization though a variety of academic perspectives in the social sciences. The consequences of an increasingly interconnected world on society and the environment are less and less in dispute. Each discipline can offer a perspective in tandem with one or more disciplines to analyze the different aspects of globalization. 

300-E05-LE Justice and Injustice (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course explores issues of Justice through a variety of academic perspectives in the social sciences. This course strives to go beyond personal understandings of justice and injustice to develop the student’s critical view of the theme. This will be achieved through the examination of relevant concepts and facts as they are defined and contextualized within selected social science disciplines pertinent to this course.  Using a variety of approaches and theories, students will apply a multidisciplinary approach in order to question, analyze and critically evaluate the different factors that contribute to the understanding of issues of Justice and Injustice. 

300-E06-LE Identity and Culture (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores issues dealing with identity and culture through a variety of academic perspectives. Each discipline can offer a perspective in tandem with at least one or more other disciplines to analyze diverse identities and cultures and explore the concepts, approaches, and theories relevant to the theme. 

300-E07-LE Money Matters (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores the idea of money as a medium of exchange, a store of value, and a source of information amongst others. Each discipline can offer a different perspective contributing to the analysis of issues pertaining to money thereby demonstrating the interconnectedness of the social sciences. 

Geography
320-010-LE Introduction to Geography (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Geography is, in the broadest sense, an education for life and for living. Learning through geography helps us all to be more socially and environmentally sensitive, informed, and responsible citizens. Geography is an all-encompassing discipline that seeks to understand the world —its human and physical phenomena —through an understanding of place and location. Geographers seek to understand where things are found, why they are present in those places and how they diffuse through space. Also, Geography studies why places and the people who live in them develop and change in particular ways. In this course students will develop their geographic perspective to be able to understand the world around them, to interpret occurrences in geographic space and to recognise viable solutions.  

320-E01-LE Globe-Trotter: The Geography of Travel and Tourism (2-1-3) 90 HRS /2 CR

The study of Geography, by its very nature, covers a wide range of contemporary issues. Travel and tourism have enabled people to access the remote, for better and for worse. This course will build on knowledge obtained in Introduction to Geography to analyze how the environment both influences, and is influenced by, economic, political, and cultural aspects of travel and tourism.  

320-E02-LE Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure is a required enrichment level course in the Sports and Leisure Profile and is an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course will be dedicated to the observation of human phenomena through the lens of geography-specific to the theme of sports and leisure. Given the nature of the competency (0PRA) students will learn to examine and analyze cultural landscapes in an applied context.   

320-E03-LE What on Earth (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

What on Earth is a required enrichment level course in the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment level course to other students. This course will be dedicated to the study of human realities through the lens of geography. It will take a regional approach and examine how human societies and physical environments are deeply connected and constantly changing. Given the nature of the competency (0PRA), students will observe and analyze the diversity of human and natural realities in an applied context.  

320-E04-LE The Global Casino: An Approach to Environmental Issues (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Money and economics underlie environmental issues and environmental issues involve winners and losers. Building on their skills obtained in Introduction to Geography students will apply their theoretical knowledge of the principles of human and physical geography to an analysis of the problems caused by human interaction with natural systems and the hopes for solutions.  

History
330-010-LE Introduction to History (3-1-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

Introduction to History allows students to develop historical knowledge by focusing on the fundamental events and actors of world history with a particular emphasis on the 15th century until today. It introduces students to the study of history as a social science. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to apply the basic concepts used in the study of history, understand the importance of historical documents, analyze at least one global phenomenon from a historical perspective and identify various viewpoints as they relate to a specific historical event. 

330-E01-LE The Contemporary World (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Contemporary World is a required enrichment level course for students of the Global Studies Profile (no math option) and an optional enrichment course for other students. It builds upon the concepts and events examined in Introduction to History. It will examine the historical context of contemporary issues with a particular emphasis on significant global events.  

330-E02-LE History of the United States (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of the United States is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. It serves as an overview of the developments and forces which have determined the course of the United States. Students will build on the knowledge and skills they gained in Introduction to History to do an analysis of America’s rise from its colonial beginnings to becoming a superpower. The students will explore the American dimension of such issues as democracy, racism, revolution, and capitalism.

330-E03-LE History of Canada (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of Canada is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. Students will examine themes in Canadian history from pre-contact Indigenous societies to the present. They will examine emerging scholarship that situates Canada in a world-historical context, as befits a country with a long history of immigration, with an emphasis on the complex dynamics affecting the interactions of multiple cultures (Indigenous, European, and later African, Asian, and other).   

330-E04-LE The Middle Ages in Europe (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Middle Ages in Europe is an optional enrichment level course in the Social Science Program. The course examines major historical developments in the Western world from Late Antiquity to the period of early attempts at global imperial expansion and settlement in 1500. Students will explore several concepts and events that echo those found in contemporary history (e.g., secularism and religion, the nation-state, and pandemic outbreaks).  

330-E05-LE History of Sports (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of Sports is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. It examines the development of sports from the Middle Ages to the present. It will focus on important events that influence the development of sports. Students will become aware of how issues of race, class, gender, and politics played an important role in how sports developed over time.   

330-E06-LE Society and Environment in History (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Society and Environment in History is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. The course examines the environmental impacts of human society from the origins of agriculture to the contemporary period. It explores historical debates over the causes of ecological disasters, societal collapses, as well as environmental successes. Themes can be explored from local, regional, national, and global perspectives. 

330-E07-LE Indigeneity and Settler-Colonialism (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Indigeneity and Settler-Colonialism is a second-level non-compulsory course in the Social Science Program. The course explores multiple instances of settler-colonialism selected from the late fifteenth century to the contemporary era. Students will examine its effects on Indigenous peoples, with an emphasis on the Indigenous perspectives of those encounters. North America and at least one other region (e.g., South America, Oceania, Polynesia, or elsewhere) will be examined. 

330-E08-LE Archives on Trial (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Archives on Trial is a required enrichment level course for students of the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. It examines legal culture, both formal and informal, through historical archives. It will examine the historical context of criminological issues through the lens of primary source material, with a particular emphasis on case studies.  

330-E09-LE Film as History (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Film as History is a second-level non-compulsory course in the Social Science Program. The course provides cinematic portrayals of history and examines them as historical arguments, given that visual literacy skills have become as essential as traditional literacy skills in understanding historical knowledge and perspectives. The course would examine a central theme (e.g., empire, gender, social classes, Cold War cinema, historical mythologies) with attention to films as an influence on historical perspectives and as cultural artifacts. 

Ancient Civilizations
332-010-LE Introduction to Ancient Civilizations (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course focuses on two major fields of study: archaeology and history. In this class, students will first learn the methods used by archaeologists and historians to reconstruct the past. These methods will then be used to explore three major developments in our human past: 1. The appearance of Homo sapiens roughly 200,000 years ago; 2. The Neolithic Revolution roughly 10,000 years ago and the origins of agriculture; 3. The rise of civilizations in Mesopotamia (c.c. 4000 BCE), Egypt (c.c. 3200 BCE), and Greece (c.c. 1500 BCE). Within each of these broad subject areas, case studies will be used to demonstrate how archaeologists and historians reconstruct the past. Students will also use these methods to research a case study independently from any ancient culture of their choice. 

332-E01-LE Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World is a required enrichment level course for students of the Sports and Leisure Profile and is an optional enrichment course for other students. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of select aspects of sport, entertainment, and/or leisure in the ancient world. Employing different types of ancient evidence, this course will focus on exploring and analysing social, cultural, political, economic, military, and/or religious aspects of sport, entertainment, and/or leisure in select societies and cultures of the ancient world. Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of ancient sport, entertainment, and/or leisure on the modern world.  

332-E02-LE In Search of the Greeks (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In Search of the Greeks is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of ancient Greek civilization. This course will explore the development of ancient Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Employing different types of ancient evidence, participants in the present course will explore and analyse the major religious, cultural, social, economic, military, and/or political elements of ancient Greek civilization. Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of the ancient Greek civilization on the modern world.    

332-E03-LE In Search of the Romans (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In Search of the Romans is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of ancient Roman civilization. Employing different types of ancient evidence, participants in the present course will examine and analyse the major religious, cultural, social, economic, military, and/or political factors which enabled Rome to expand from a small town into a vast empire governing diverse peoples, spanning the period from the foundation of the city of Rome (753 BCE) to the Crisis of the Third Century (235-284 CE). Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of the ancient Roman civilization on the modern world. 

Psychology
350-010-LE Introduction to Psychology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is an introduction to the discipline of psychology and highlights the contributions it has made to the understanding of human beings. As such, it will introduce students to the main perspectives, schools of thought, and the principal methodological approaches to the study of human behaviour and mental processes.  It is a required course in all social science profiles and serves as a prerequisite for all enrichment level Psychology courses. 

350-E01-LE Psychology of Mental Health (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Psychology of Mental Health is a required enrichment level psychology course for students of the Psychology and Society Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. While analyzing mental health from a holistic body/mind perspective, students will learn to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy behaviours and recognize the forces that undermine physical and mental health. Students will also learn about psychological disorders and the therapies that help those in need.  

350-E02-LE Psychology and Crime (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology and Crime is a required enrichment-level psychology course for students of the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. The course is designed to provide a broad overview of the psychological study of crime and criminal behaviour. A number of topics related to the various aspects of crime and the judicial process will be investigated.  

350-E03-LE Psychology of Sport, Exercise, and Leisure (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Psychology of Sport, Exercise, and Leisure is a required enrichment level course for students of the Sports and Leisure Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students This course will present an introduction to the psychology of sport, exercise, and leisure. Students will learn about concepts, theories, and models pertaining to sport and exercise behaviour. It will examine psychological interventions to improve sport performance and exercise adherence and address a variety of sport, leisure, and exercise psychology topics.  

350-E04-LE Psychology of Human Sexuality (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Human Sexuality is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will analyze the biological, psychological, and sociocultural key dimensions of human sexuality while exploring its emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physical nature. The course will also examine myths, taboos, and misguided beliefs about this central aspect of human identity.  

350-E05-LE Human Relations and Communication (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Human Relations and Communication is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will learn about the factors which foster or inhibit successful personal interactions and communication. Students will have the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge in various experiential exercises.  

350-E06-LE Cognitive Psychology (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Cognitive Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will be introduced to cognitive processes, such as attention, memory, language, decision-making, and thinking. Students will gain insight into the fundamental role of cognition in the human realities studied.

350-E07-LE Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Industrial and Organizational Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. This course will present an introduction to the psychological study of human behaviour in organizations and the workplace. Topics will center around analyzing principles of individual, group, and organizational behaviour, and the application of this knowledge to issues at work.   

350-E08-LE Psychology of Music (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Music is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. This course will present an introduction to the psychological study of music. It will address the questions of what music is, how we perceive it, and how it impacts us as human beings. 

350-E09-LE Social Psychology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Social Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will develop a basic understanding of the history, methods, and principal concepts of social psychology. The students will gain insights into how behaviour is influenced by social variables and processes.  

350-E10-LE Psychology of Development (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Development is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will analyze human development throughout the lifespan - from the womb to the tomb. Students will learn how the basic concepts, principles and theories that describe the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial changes that occur are woven together.

Economics
383-010-LE Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will be introduced to the main economic questions that a society must answer and to the main techniques that societies use to answer these questions. Students will learn the principal economic goals of society, why they are important, and how performance in achieving these goals is measured. This course also familiarises students with the basic model of how the macroeconomy functions; this model will be presented in a general form and then in more detail with extensive use of graphs.  Students will also learn the ways in which a market economy is vulnerable to failure in achieving its main macroeconomic goals, and some of the government policy tools that can be used to rectify problems in the economy, such as monetary or fiscal policies.  

383-E01-LE Microeconomics: Behaviors of Decision Takers (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Microeconomics: Behaviours of Decision Takers is a required enrichment level course in the Commerce Profile. It provides students with an opportunity to expand their knowledge in the Economics discipline and build on the knowledge and skills gained in Introduction to Economics, focusing more on the role consumers and firms play in the Economy. Students will analyze how individuals' behavior in decision-making can influence the allocation of resources and prices in markets, with the use of concepts such as Elasticity, Utility theory, Diminishing marginal utility, Opportunity costs, and Extensions of the Supply and Demand model.   

383-E02-LE Advanced Global Economics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Advanced Global Economics is a required enrichment level course for students of the Global Studies Profile (no math option) and an optional enrichment course for other students. Students will build on the skills and techniques learned in Introduction to Economics. Students will analyze the history of international trade and the evolution of the main ideas of trade theory. Students will learn how to explain the principle of comparative advantage and apply it to cases of voluntary exchange. Students will apply supply and demand diagrams and the concepts of producers’ surplus and consumers’ surplus to the analysis of the gains and losses from trade, as well as the gains and losses associated with different barriers to trade. 

383-E03-LE The Economics of Crime (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will provide an overview of core issues related to the economics of crime. Economic principles can explain every part of the criminal justice system and many of the motivations behind criminal acts. Laws create incentives for people to act in certain ways. Within an economic framework, the course will consider the ways in which social programs and other social conditions such as education, poverty, family structure, and even environmental factors affect crime.   

383-E04-LE Economic Issues (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Economic Issues is an enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will learn how to apply economic theories to analyse issues related to the market, globalization, national debt, the environment, and business.      

Students will explore both sides of issues that pertain to the Canadian and international economic environment. This course will cover topics such as extensions of supply and demand curves, Producers and Consumers' Behaviors facing Uncertainties, Fiscal Policies, Budget Deficit and National Debt, Growth and Inequalities, Globalization, Environmental Economics, and Global warming.    

Political Science
385-010-LE Introduction to Political Science (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The purpose of Introduction to Political Science is to introduce students to the study of political science. Through the lens of this social science discipline, students are to become familiar with the pillars of political decision-making in their communities. Politics being an intrinsic element of life in society in the 21st century, this course equips students to appreciate the basic workings of political power struggles.   

To that effect, students will develop a political science vocabulary covering the basic terminology of power, authority, and legitimacy. They will also get acquainted with the major schools of thoughts and will develop an understanding for the dynamic of political institutions and be able to identify the great variety of political actors that exist.   

This study will be paired up with a critical vision of political events that ultimately demands from students to identify in current events who are the holders of power, describe how they yield that power, and what ends they serve.  

385-E01-LE Criminal Justice (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Criminal Justice is a required enrichment level course in the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course will focus on the Canadian criminal justice system and its key components: the police, court, and correction institutions. In doing so, students will study the foundations of criminal law and of the Canadian constitution, the effects of the federal distribution of power on the system, and the importance of courts in a democratic regime. Comparison with elements of other countries’ criminal justice systems will be drawn out to assist students in their studies. The course will also explore contemporary issues and analyze classic court cases that form the backbone of the Canadian criminal justice system.  

385-E02-LE World Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

World Politics is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. The course will familiarize students with the central theories, concepts, and debates in the field of world politics, and highlight the key actors and events that influenced the development and relationships that characterize the world system today. The course will apply theories in the study of world politics to study a series of topics relevant to world politics. The course will give importance to discussions on current events that will help shed light on the global networks of power and the political dynamics between international state actors and transnational non-state actors that transcend political borders. Ultimately, the course encourages students to generate critical and informed views on the most pressing issues within the world system and enables them to identify political priorities for collective action based on their expanded knowledge and understanding of global politics. 

385-E03-LE Comparative Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Comparative Politics is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. In this course, students will analyze the fundamental concepts of state, government, regime, society, and the economy as well as the ideals of freedom and equality. These concepts will be examined with some historical background and explored with a comparative approach spanning over several countries. The analysis of contemporary issues like democratization, wealth inequality, religious fundamentalism, political culture, and political violence will be necessary to the understanding and critical assessment of these fundamental concepts. 

385-E04-LE Global Development (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Global Development is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. In this course, students will explore the idea that societies and countries have different levels of political, economic, and human development on a global scale. Through the study of a variety of development issues, students will further their understanding of the unequal power relations between the West and the rest of the world, challenge the notion of a single development path, and acknowledge the diversity of cultural perspectives and priorities. 

385-E05-LE Identity Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Identity Politics is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course will explore the meaning and examine the role that identity plays in politics and political outcomes and draw on current relevant examples and issues at the national and global level to understand how and why identities are so central in motivating individuals’ political behavior and the state’s response to it. Students will analyze how different identity categories such as those based on race, class, religion, ethnicity, indigeneity, partisanship, national affiliation, sexual and gender identity, etc., influence the dynamics and organization of political systems, and the formation of public policy, political attitudes, values, and opinions. Through the study of contemporary issues, students will evaluate how identities are experienced politically in particular contexts and how they come to shape the way individuals choose to participate in politics, how they mobilize to challenge or safeguard dominant ideas about Justice, and how states engage, or not, with the political claims of both privileged and oppressed identity groups. 

385-E06-LE War, Conflict, and Violence (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

War, Conflict, and Violence is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course will explore the origins, development, and consequences of armed conflicts and violent upheavals. Students will become familiar with the typology of revolutions, rebellions, terrorism, coups, guerilla warfare, class struggle, civil war, war, ethnic conflict, and genocide. Through the study of specific incarnations of political violence and current or long-standing conflicts, students will further their understanding of the means by which those who rule the world maintain their power, how people have fought for freedom and equality, and how conflicts result in a broad array of human casualties such as victims of sexual violence, internally displaced people, refugees, lost generations, etc. 

385-E07-LE Sexuality, Gender, and Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sexuality, Gender, and Politics is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course examines sex, gender, and politics with a particular emphasis on questions of power, oppression, representation, and bodily autonomy. We will consider the ways sexuality and gender are informed by— and challenge—key political ideas such as freedoms, rights, and justice. An intersectional feminist approach will guide much of the course’s analysis. We will study conceptual and practical problems through the investigation of contemporary issues and policy questions related to, among others, sexual and gender-based violence, access to sexual and reproductive healthcare, sex work, discrimination against LGBTQIA2S+ communities, barriers to education and the workplace, etc., and profile people and movements involved in the advancement of gender and sexual equality and justice. 

385-E08-LE Environmental Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Environmental Politics is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will examine the actors and dynamics associated with environmentalism understood as a broad political ideology and social movement with a variety of perspectives about the causes of environmental problems and the best way to deal with these problems. Through the study of the numerous environmental problems the world faces, students will further their understanding of humanity’s complicated relationship with nature, the limits of economic growth, and the roles that political actors can play in protecting the natural environment and ensuring that it can sustain all forms of life. 

385-E09-LE Law, Power, and the State (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Law, Power, and the State is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course will primarily investigate state-made laws in a Canadian context. The origin of laws, civil and common law traditions, constitutional, civil, corporate, and criminal law, as well as domestic and international laws, will be analyzed. Institutions pertinent to the development of laws and adjudication over legal matters will be examined. The course will also provide a critical assessment of state law with the exploration of other competing norms from cultural, religious, or aboriginal institutions. 

Sociology
387-010-LE Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course introduces students to sociology, one of the founding disciplines of the social sciences. While going over the original contributions of sociology’s classic and contemporary authors, students progressively acquire a conceptual “toolbox” that will prove useful throughout their studies in the Social Science Program. As they discover the main notions and concepts in the discipline, students learn to see public issues as diverse as mental health, inequalities, and crime, in a new light.  

Why are things the way they are? Who gains, and who doesn’t? Is change possible? As it explores inconvenient facts and perspectives, this course fosters students’ intellectual curiosity and gives them various tools and reasons to engage in Quebec society. 

387-E01-LE Sociology of Deviance and Crime (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sociology of Deviance and Crime is a required enrichment level course in the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course situates the study of crime in the larger sociological approach to deviance and social regulation.  From this perspective, it examines the ways in which the cultural categories of crime and its punishment are products of concrete societies and contexts.  Analyzing classical and contemporary theories, students gain sociological insight into the origins of deviance and crime, including such issues as marginalization, discrimination, and social inequality.  

387-E02-LE Sociology of Health and Wellbeing (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sociology of Health and Wellbeing is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. Approaching health in the broad sense, this course proposes to examine health from a sociological perspective, revealing the normative and institutional frameworks through which societies define health/illness, clean/unclean, life/death, etc.  Students gain insight into the ways in which these structures shape attitudes, actions, and interactions.  The course also equips students to think critically about the individualization of mental, physical, and spiritual health, revealing the importance of material and social factors.  

387-E03-LE The Great Transformation of Societies (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Great Transformation of Societies is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. This course looks at the dizzying social changes brought upon traditional societies by the maelstrom of capitalism and modernity over the last few centuries. By the end of this course, students should be able to think critically about how industrialization, state-building, and competitive markets have undermined previous social structures and are fundamentally altering humankind's social relations.  

387-E04-LE Critical Study of Media and Public Opinion (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Critical Study of Media and Public Opinion is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. This course explores the role of mass media, social media, and the culture industry in communicating ideological messages and symbols to the population while fulfilling the functions of entertainment and information. By the end of this course, students should be able to think critically about how the inequalities of wealth and power that surround cultural production shape public opinion and legitimize values, beliefs, and codes of behavior.    

387-E05-LE Marginalized Voices and Identities (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Marginalized Voices and Identities is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. This course explores the complex phenomenon of social inequalities as they pertain to gender, social class, ethnicity, and more. Students learn about the dynamics of power, privilege, and marginalization in contemporary societies. The concept of social identity is explored in relation to people’s position in society’s structure of power (political, economic, and symbolic). The intersections of various inequalities lead the students to reflect on notions such as positionality, normativity, institutionalization, and social change, among others. 

387-E06-LE Social Issues: From Private Troubles to Collective Responses (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Social Issues: From Private Troubles to Collective Responses is a required enrichment level course in the Psychology and Society Profile and an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course aims to solidify students’ sociological outlook on a variety of contemporary social issues and debates. In light of some of sociology’s major contributions, students learn to analyze social issues critically, focusing on their social construction, the impacts of social inequalities, and the ways in which societies and institutions respond. Finally, through fieldwork, field trips, or immersion projects, students learn to apply some of sociology’s observation techniques in order to gain a more concrete understanding of social problems.  

Business Administration
401-100-LE Introduction to Business and Administration (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The course will provide students with a general understanding of all types of administrative duties and develop a broad vocabulary related to the field. Although the focus will be on businesses, the class will also address the distinctive needs of public, not-for-profit and other non-governmental organizations.  Attention will also be placed on the importance of clear, concise, and professional business report presentations, namely through the required term project.  

Students will be introduced to the overall internal operations of businesses, and they will come to appreciate that many, if not all, business functions (production, marketing, human resource, finance, and information technologies) are also a daily concern for not-for-profit organizations, even though the terminology may be different.   

401-E01-LE Principles of Financial Management (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Principles of Financial Management is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will build on the knowledge and skills acquired in Introduction to Business and Administration through a more in-depth study of the principles and methods of financial management. Students will learn to apply the basic finance concepts employed by individuals and organizations to real-life situations. After successfully completing this course, students will be able to: understand the nature of financing operations and apply financial management theory to real business situations; analyze financial results through the computation of various financial ratios, understand the basic mechanisms of the stock market, and evaluate the most relevant financing methods for a given organization.   

401-E02-LE Law in the Business Environment (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Law in the Business Environment is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will build on the knowledge and skills they gained in Introduction to Business and Administration. This course is structured to provide the student with a basic understanding of the nature, function, contribution, and influence of law in the context of the business environment, and the opportunity to develop legal, ethical, and analytical skills. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to: (1) demonstrate an understanding of the key legal terms, concepts, and theories used in the current business environment; (2) apply them to identify situations that have legal implications for business; and (3) demonstrate critical thinking skills by the use of appropriate strategies to analyze legal problems and evaluate solutions.  

401-E03-LE Marketing: Speaking to People’s Needs (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Marketing: Speaking to People’s Needs is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will enter a more in-depth study of the principles and methods of marketing. Students will learn how to apply the basic marketing concepts employed by individuals and organizations to real-life situations. After successfully completing this course, students will be able to: understand the nature of marketing and apply marketing theory to real business situations; analyze how marketing decisions are made in the current business environment; describe how consumer behaviour is affected by various factors; relate product strategy to the other variables of the marketing mix and analyze marketing cases.  

401-E04-LE The Business of Sport (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Business of Sport is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. People identify with "their people", their tribe. Tribes need heroes, and today's heroes are our sports figures. As such these figures and their activities undergo immense scrutiny and draw huge fan bases. People will spend their money and devote huge amounts of time to these groups, making them highly valuable businesses. This class will examine the business models that are viable in a sports environment and how they can be profitable, their contribution to society, and their ethical implications of them. 

401-E05-LE Next Level Business (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Next Level Business is a required enrichment level course for students of the Commerce Profile and is an optional enrichment course for other students. This class will take the principals learned in Introduction to Business and Administration in order to take the understanding of students to the next level. Students will revisit the concepts of administration and organizational activities to see real-world applications of theory and analyse the successes and failures of various organizations. From the NGO to the fortune 500, from municipalities to ministries, humans endeavour to administer organizations and corporations to succeed in advancing human society using: Marketing, Operations Management, Human Resources, Finance, and I.T. we will see how various structures are administered and deliver value to clients, key partners and do so in a financially viable fashion that ultimately advances human society.   

401-E06-LE Management: Human Resources and Financial Tools (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Management: Human Resources and Financial Tools is an optional enrichment level course in the Social Science Program. In this course students will build on the skills and knowledge they gained in Introduction to Business and Administration. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the main methods and principles of the effective management of human, material, and capital resources. Students will apply the principles of management theory to typical situations in small and medium-sized businesses, as well as charitable, not-for-profit, and other organizations in society. Through a combination of theory and practical applications, they will learn how to analyze management as a process. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the main concepts and principles of management theory; to analyze the functions of management and its role in organizations and in society; and to apply appropriate management practices to real-world situations. 

University Pre-requisites
101-0U1-LE The Biology of Behaviour (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Social interactions, mental disorders, and our reactions to the external environment – these topics bring about the question of nature versus nurture. Understanding the role of biological systems can help us make sense of the complexity of human behavior. In this course, we will explore the role of the nervous and endocrine systems in the maintenance of internal physiological balance and the manifestation of behaviours. We will further investigate the topic of human behaviour by delving into the reproductive system and inheritance. 

201-0U1-LE Differential Calculus (3-2-3) 75 HRS / 2 2/3 CR

This course is an introduction to calculus. It is designed to enable students to understand the idea of limit and derivative of basic functions and to learn the principal concepts and methods of differential calculus. Students will also learn how to (1) formulate a functional model of certain business, economic, and other current human realities using the appropriate terminology and definitions, (2) solve problems based on functional models using differential calculus with rigorous mathematical reasoning, and (3) explain and interpret the results using appropriate language. Applications include problems involving rates of change, optimization, and demographics.

201-0U2-LE Integral Calculus (2-2-3) 60 HRS / 2 1/3 CR

In this course, students will build on the skills and knowledge they acquired in Differential Calculus. The aim is for students to understand the idea of the definite and indefinite integral and to learn the concepts and methods of integral calculus. Students will also learn how to (1) formulate a functional model of certain business, economic, and other current human realities using the appropriate terminology and definitions, (2) solve problems based on functional models using integral calculus with rigorous mathematical reasoning, and (3) explain and interpret the results using appropriate language. Applications include problems involving separable differential equations and bounded areas (Consumer’s Surplus, Producer’s surplus and equilibrium point, Lorenz curve, and Gini coefficient).

201-0U3-LE Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry (2-2-3) 60 HRS / 2 1/3 CR

In this course, students will be introduced to linear algebra and vector geometry. Students will acquire basic skills in manipulating vectors and matrices and learn the principal methods for solving linear systems of equations (Gaussian Elimination, Inverse Method) and inequalities (simplex method). They will also learn how to (1) formulate a linear model of certain business, economic, and other current human realities using the appropriate terminology and definitions, (2) solve problems based on linear models with rigorous mathematical reasoning, and (3) explain and interpret the results using appropriate language. Applications include Leontief’s method, optimization problems, and Markov processes.  

360-0U1-LE Probability and Statistics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will build on the skills and knowledge they acquired in Quantitative Analysis to the interpretation of data, statistical inference, and decision-making in the context of the social sciences. Students will learn how to choose and perform the statistical procedure that is appropriate to current human reality. Students will also learn how to work with probability concepts. Some simple ideas about chance will be introduced in the context of whether chance can be ruled out as an explanation for a relationship observed in a sample or whether bias may also be present.

NOTE: SOME COURSE TITLES MAY DIFFER SLIGHTLY ON STUDENTS' TRANSCRIPTS; PLEASE REFER TO COURSE NUMBERS.

GRADUATE EXIT PROFILE

 

The Graduate Exit Profile constitutes the local interpretation of the general aims and goals of the Social Science Program. It is defined by sixteen attributes students graduating from the program are expected to possess. The Graduate Profile figures prominently in the formulation of the criteria according to which the Program evaluates students’ Comprehensive Assessment. The essential attributes of the Graduate Exit Profile are: 

 

Academic Knowledge  Scientific Research 
Goal: Integrate and apply skills and knowledge acquired in the Social Science Program to study human phenomena from a trans-disciplinary approach. 

 

  • Recognize, compare, and integrate different fields of knowledge in the social sciences. 
  • Differentiate between and apply various theoretical and methodological frameworks particular to the disciplines of the social sciences.  
  • Explain the main concepts, theories, laws, models, and schools of thought (past and present) in the disciplines of the social sciences.  
Goal: Use research skills to access information from multiple sources; use critical thinking skills to evaluate and synthesize information in the form of conclusions, ideas, and opinions. 

 

  • Use technology as a research tool in qualitative and quantitative data interpretation. 
  • Use scientific methods in the social sciences to examine human phenomena at different scales from multiple disciplines.  
  • Use identified critical thinking skills independently and reflectively to master the basic rules of rational thought, critical discourse, and coherent argumentation.  
  • Demonstrate technological and media literacy. Show an understanding of the role of academic and non-academic sources in understanding the world. 
Communication  Citizenship 
Goal: Express ideas clearly and creatively in diverse ways through speech, writing and technologies. 

 

  • Read and comprehend material in diverse social science disciplines in English and French. 
  • Convey ideas, information, and concepts responsibly and coherently in both oral and written English and French.  
  • Articulate and defend an academic argument orally and in writing. 
  • Develop appropriate use of technologies to communicate orally and in writing.  
  • Apply proper academic formatting and value academic integrity.  
Goal: Recognize one’s role in world community issues with respect for diverse cultures and differing perspectives.  

 

  • Engage in respectful and collaborative activities with peers exploring diverse world views.  
  • Compare and contrast different points of view and perspectives. 
  • Evaluate important contemporary issues with special emphasis on the Quebec context and on the realities and perspectives of the First Nations and Inuit. 
  • Use effective life skills to improve and maintain mental and physical well-being.  

 

THE COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

 

The Comprehensive Assessment will serve to evaluate each graduating student’s attainment of the goals outlined in the Graduate Exit Profile and will be completed within the 300-400-LE Integrative Course). Within the scope of the Integrative Course, students will carry out a major original project, such as an academic research project or equivalent major assignment. This project will integrate the perspectives of three social science disciplines and will involve publicly sharing the results. Students will also critically reflect on the effects of their social science training on their role as students and citizens. The research project and associated reflections will serve as the basis of their Comprehensive Assessment, the purpose of which is to ensure that students have integrated the knowledge and skills required of the Social Science Program. 

 

The following Learning Outcomes of the Social Science Exit Profile will be assessed by the Comprehensive Assessment: 

 

  • Differentiate between and apply various theoretical and methodological frameworks particular to the disciplines of the social sciences. 
  • Explain the main concepts, theories, laws, models, and schools of thought (past and present) in the disciplines of the social sciences. 
  • Use technology as a research tool in qualitative and quantitative data interpretation. 
  • Use scientific methods in the social sciences to examine human phenomena at different scales from multiple disciplines. 
  • Evaluate important contemporary issues with special emphasis on the Quebec context and on the realities and perspectives of the First Nations and Inuit. 
  • Use effective life skills to improve and maintain mental and physical well-being. 

Psychology and Society Profile (300.A1)

Also known as Sciences humaines – Profil psychologie et relations humaines

💭 THIS PROGRAM IS FOR YOU IF…

  • You like to discuss, debate, and express your opinions 
  • You are interested in current events
  • You are interested in human realities and the challenges facing humanity
  • You want to think about solutions for the challenges facing humanity
  • You want to go to university
  • You like different perspectives and want to learn more about the disciplines of ancient civilizations, history, geography, economics, political science, psychology, and sociology
  • You would like to do a cross-cultural project

Program Description

 

The Social Science Program is an exciting pre-university program that provides students with a balanced education involving general and scientific learning in a variety of disciplines, thereby making it possible for them to understand and analyze human realities. This training will equip students with the necessary knowledge, regardless of profile, to pursue university studies in 100s of different programs (certain prerequisite courses may be required).  

 

Students may choose from one of five profiles: Criminology, Psychology and Society, Commerce, Global Studies, and Sports and Leisure.

 

The Psychology and Society, Commerce, Global Studies with Math, and Sports and Leisure with Math Profiles are all linked to specific university prerequisites and are intended to prepare students for those particular fields of study.

Profile Description

 

This profile focuses on the role of the individual in society and requires the completion of specific university prerequisites for various psychology programs. All students will take two enrichment psychology courses, including the Psychology of Mental Health and one of their choice. This will allow them to explore the discipline of Psychology. They will also take the enrichment Sociology Course – Social Issues: From Private Troubles to Collective Responses – which will provide important society-level context for their studies in psychology. Additionally, students will complete The Biology of Behaviour and Probability and Statistics, both of which often serve as university prerequisites for many psychology programs. 

 

Students have the option to take one introductory-level course in Ancient Civilizations, Political Science, or Geography which will serve as a pre-requisite for the optional enrichment-level course in semester 4. 

Untitled (1800 × 600 px)

Overview

PREREQUISITES

Secondary 4 Cultural, Social and Technical Mathematics Option
OR
Mathematics 416

Overview

OBJECTIVES

 

By the end of the Social Science program, students will be able to: 

  • Explain human realities by using the main facts, concepts, theories, models, and approaches specific to the social science disciplines; 
  • Examine various issues related to citizenship in today’s world; 
  • Use academic work tools and methods as well as the technology needed to successfully pursue their studies; 
  • Demonstrate scientific intellect and intellectual curiosity, and think critically; 
  • Experiment with social science research methods; 
  • Convey their ideas in a clear and organized manner in the language of instruction and use information resources in their second language in the context of their social science studies; 
  • Demonstrate that the subject-specific and methodological learning required to study human realities has been integrated. 

PROGRAM GRID ➡️ Certificate Holders

Total courses: 30
Total credits: 58

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge  300-100-LE
Introduction to History 330-010-LE
Introduction to Psychology  350-010-LE
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics 383-010-LE 
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application 345-101-MQ
Introduction to College English  603-101-MQ

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods  300-010-LE
The Biology of Behaviour  101-0U1-LE
Introduction to Sociology  387-010-LE
Introduction option of choice *
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
Humanities – World Views 345-102-MQ
English for Social Science  603-BEK-LE
French – General   602-MQ

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis 360-010-LE
Thematic Issue (choice) 300-E01-LE to 
300-E07-LE
Psychology of Mental Health 350-E01-LE
Social Issues: From Private Troubles to Collective Responses 387-E06-LE
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle  109-103-MQ
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ 
French – Specific  602-BE 
Complementary Course  

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE
Probability and Statistics  603-10?-MQ
Enrichment option in Psychology  350-E02-LE to 350-E10-LE
Enrichment option of choice**
Humanities – Ethical Issues 345-BE
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or 603-103-MQ 
Complementary Course   

PROGRAM GRID ➡️ Non-Certificate Holders

Total courses: 30
Total credits: 58

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge  300-100-LE
Introduction to History 330-010-LE
Introduction to Psychology  350-010-LE
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics 383-010-LE 
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application 345-101-MQ
Introduction to College English  603-101-MQ

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods  300-010-LE
The Biology of Behaviour  101-0U1-LE
Introduction to Sociology  387-010-LE
Introduction option of choice *
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
Humanities – World Views 345-102-MQ
English for Social Science  603-BEK-LE
Oeuvres narratives et écriture 602-UF0-MQ

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis 360-010-LE
Thematic Issue (choice) 300-E01-LE to 
300-E07-LE
Psychology of Mental Health 350-E01-LE
Social Issues: From Private Troubles to Collective Responses 387-E06-LE
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle  109-103-MQ
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ 
Poésie, théâtre et écriture 602-UF1-MQ
Complementary Course  

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE
Probability and Statistics  603-10?-MQ
Enrichment option in Psychology  350-E02-LE to 350-E10-LE
Enrichment option of choice**
Humanities – Ethical Issues 345-BE
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or 603-103-MQ 
Comparaison d’oeuvres littéraires  602-UF2-MQ

* In the first year, students in the Psychology and Society Profile select ONE Social Science introduction level option from Geography, Business Administration, Ancient Civilizations, and Political Science.

 

**In the second year, students select ONE enrichment level Social Science course from disciplines opened in the first year with a maximum of two second-level courses from any one discipline.

COURSES

Methodology and Integration Courses
300-100-LE Academic Skills and Knowledge (2-1-2) 45 HRS / 1 1/2 CR

This course is designed to teach students the fundamental academic skills of researching, reading, and writing in the social sciences. Students are taught how to search for, comprehend and synthesize academic sources in the context of social science research. Throughout this process, they will recognize the various disciplinary perspectives that compose the social sciences and their respective perspectives on a diversity of topics. As they progress through the course, students will gain skills related to searching academic databases, critical evaluation of information, teamwork, academic writing, and oral communication. 

300-010-LE Qualitative Methods (2-2-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to teach students how to distinguish between scientific and non-scientific knowledge, to learn about basic ethics in social science research, to work in teams, to apply a scientific approach to knowledge in the social sciences, and to understand the limits of social science research. They will be introduced to a variety of qualitative approaches used in the social sciences. Using qualitative tools, they will collect, analyze, and interpret data. Students will put into practice qualitative approaches to social science research and will produce a research report that documents their methods and results.  

360-010-LE Quantitative Analysis (2-2-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to teach students to use statistical tools to process and describe data related to the field of social sciences. Students are taught a number of statistical and data collection techniques to understand the possibilities and limitations of quantitative analysis. Learning these statistical techniques will help students to describe and interpret human realities. 

300-400-LE Integrative Course (1-3-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to demonstrate an integration of what students have learned in the social sciences. Within the scope of the course, students will carry out a major original project, such as an academic research paper or equivalent major assignment. This project will integrate the perspectives of three social science disciplines and will involve sharing results with others. Students will also critically reflect on the effects of their social science training on their role as student and citizen. 

Thematic Issue Courses
300-E01-LE The Environment (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores issues in the environment demonstrating both the topical importance of the environment, as well as the interconnectedness of disciplines across the social sciences. This course is designed to equip students with a critical perspective on the roles of individuals and communities in shaping the environment, leading to an appreciation of the way they perceive the world and their place in it. 

300-E02-LE Indigenous Realities (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores the realities of Indigenous peoples in North America and around the world through a variety of academic perspectives. Each discipline may offer a perspective in tandem with one or more other disciplines, demonstrating their interconnectedness across the social sciences. This course will investigate the lived experiences of Indigenous peoples, as well as the impacts of colonialism in its myriad forms. 

300-E03-LE Media and Technology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Using a variety of academic perspectives, this course explores issues related to media in society as well as the broader topic of technology. Students will analyze the role and power of technologies and media in society, building on multiple disciplines in the social sciences. This course is designed to equip students with media literacy skills and a critical perspective on science and communication, leading to a reflection on their own position as citizens, consumers, and producers of culture. 

300-E04-LE Globalization (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course explores issues of Globalization though a variety of academic perspectives in the social sciences. The consequences of an increasingly interconnected world on society and the environment are less and less in dispute. Each discipline can offer a perspective in tandem with one or more disciplines to analyze the different aspects of globalization. 

300-E05-LE Justice and Injustice (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course explores issues of Justice through a variety of academic perspectives in the social sciences. This course strives to go beyond personal understandings of justice and injustice to develop the student’s critical view of the theme. This will be achieved through the examination of relevant concepts and facts as they are defined and contextualized within selected social science disciplines pertinent to this course.  Using a variety of approaches and theories, students will apply a multidisciplinary approach in order to question, analyze and critically evaluate the different factors that contribute to the understanding of issues of Justice and Injustice. 

300-E06-LE Identity and Culture (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores issues dealing with identity and culture through a variety of academic perspectives. Each discipline can offer a perspective in tandem with at least one or more other disciplines to analyze diverse identities and cultures and explore the concepts, approaches, and theories relevant to the theme. 

300-E07-LE Money Matters (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores the idea of money as a medium of exchange, a store of value, and a source of information amongst others. Each discipline can offer a different perspective contributing to the analysis of issues pertaining to money thereby demonstrating the interconnectedness of the social sciences. 

Geography
320-010-LE Introduction to Geography (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Geography is, in the broadest sense, an education for life and for living. Learning through geography helps us all to be more socially and environmentally sensitive, informed, and responsible citizens. Geography is an all-encompassing discipline that seeks to understand the world —its human and physical phenomena —through an understanding of place and location. Geographers seek to understand where things are found, why they are present in those places and how they diffuse through space. Also, Geography studies why places and the people who live in them develop and change in particular ways. In this course students will develop their geographic perspective to be able to understand the world around them, to interpret occurrences in geographic space and to recognise viable solutions.  

320-E01-LE Globe-Trotter: The Geography of Travel and Tourism (2-1-3) 90 HRS /2 CR

The study of Geography, by its very nature, covers a wide range of contemporary issues. Travel and tourism have enabled people to access the remote, for better and for worse. This course will build on knowledge obtained in Introduction to Geography to analyze how the environment both influences, and is influenced by, economic, political, and cultural aspects of travel and tourism.  

320-E02-LE Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure is a required enrichment level course in the Sports and Leisure Profile and is an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course will be dedicated to the observation of human phenomena through the lens of geography-specific to the theme of sports and leisure. Given the nature of the competency (0PRA) students will learn to examine and analyze cultural landscapes in an applied context.   

320-E03-LE What on Earth (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

What on Earth is a required enrichment level course in the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment level course to other students. This course will be dedicated to the study of human realities through the lens of geography. It will take a regional approach and examine how human societies and physical environments are deeply connected and constantly changing. Given the nature of the competency (0PRA), students will observe and analyze the diversity of human and natural realities in an applied context.  

320-E04-LE The Global Casino: An Approach to Environmental Issues (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Money and economics underlie environmental issues and environmental issues involve winners and losers. Building on their skills obtained in Introduction to Geography students will apply their theoretical knowledge of the principles of human and physical geography to an analysis of the problems caused by human interaction with natural systems and the hopes for solutions.  

History
330-010-LE Introduction to History (3-1-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

Introduction to History allows students to develop historical knowledge by focusing on the fundamental events and actors of world history with a particular emphasis on the 15th century until today. It introduces students to the study of history as a social science. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to apply the basic concepts used in the study of history, understand the importance of historical documents, analyze at least one global phenomenon from a historical perspective and identify various viewpoints as they relate to a specific historical event. 

330-E01-LE The Contemporary World (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Contemporary World is a required enrichment level course for students of the Global Studies Profile (no math option) and an optional enrichment course for other students. It builds upon the concepts and events examined in Introduction to History. It will examine the historical context of contemporary issues with a particular emphasis on significant global events.  

330-E02-LE History of the United States (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of the United States is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. It serves as an overview of the developments and forces which have determined the course of the United States. Students will build on the knowledge and skills they gained in Introduction to History to do an analysis of America’s rise from its colonial beginnings to becoming a superpower. The students will explore the American dimension of such issues as democracy, racism, revolution, and capitalism.

330-E03-LE History of Canada (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of Canada is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. Students will examine themes in Canadian history from pre-contact Indigenous societies to the present. They will examine emerging scholarship that situates Canada in a world-historical context, as befits a country with a long history of immigration, with an emphasis on the complex dynamics affecting the interactions of multiple cultures (Indigenous, European, and later African, Asian, and other).   

330-E04-LE The Middle Ages in Europe (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Middle Ages in Europe is an optional enrichment level course in the Social Science Program. The course examines major historical developments in the Western world from Late Antiquity to the period of early attempts at global imperial expansion and settlement in 1500. Students will explore several concepts and events that echo those found in contemporary history (e.g., secularism and religion, the nation-state, and pandemic outbreaks).  

330-E05-LE History of Sports (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of Sports is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. It examines the development of sports from the Middle Ages to the present. It will focus on important events that influence the development of sports. Students will become aware of how issues of race, class, gender, and politics played an important role in how sports developed over time.   

330-E06-LE Society and Environment in History (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Society and Environment in History is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. The course examines the environmental impacts of human society from the origins of agriculture to the contemporary period. It explores historical debates over the causes of ecological disasters, societal collapses, as well as environmental successes. Themes can be explored from local, regional, national, and global perspectives. 

330-E07-LE Indigeneity and Settler-Colonialism (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Indigeneity and Settler-Colonialism is a second-level non-compulsory course in the Social Science Program. The course explores multiple instances of settler-colonialism selected from the late fifteenth century to the contemporary era. Students will examine its effects on Indigenous peoples, with an emphasis on the Indigenous perspectives of those encounters. North America and at least one other region (e.g., South America, Oceania, Polynesia, or elsewhere) will be examined. 

330-E08-LE Archives on Trial (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Archives on Trial is a required enrichment level course for students of the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. It examines legal culture, both formal and informal, through historical archives. It will examine the historical context of criminological issues through the lens of primary source material, with a particular emphasis on case studies.  

330-E09-LE Film as History (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Film as History is a second-level non-compulsory course in the Social Science Program. The course provides cinematic portrayals of history and examines them as historical arguments, given that visual literacy skills have become as essential as traditional literacy skills in understanding historical knowledge and perspectives. The course would examine a central theme (e.g., empire, gender, social classes, Cold War cinema, historical mythologies) with attention to films as an influence on historical perspectives and as cultural artifacts. 

Ancient Civilizations
332-010-LE Introduction to Ancient Civilizations (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course focuses on two major fields of study: archaeology and history. In this class, students will first learn the methods used by archaeologists and historians to reconstruct the past. These methods will then be used to explore three major developments in our human past: 1. The appearance of Homo sapiens roughly 200,000 years ago; 2. The Neolithic Revolution roughly 10,000 years ago and the origins of agriculture; 3. The rise of civilizations in Mesopotamia (c.c. 4000 BCE), Egypt (c.c. 3200 BCE), and Greece (c.c. 1500 BCE). Within each of these broad subject areas, case studies will be used to demonstrate how archaeologists and historians reconstruct the past. Students will also use these methods to research a case study independently from any ancient culture of their choice. 

332-E01-LE Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World is a required enrichment level course for students of the Sports and Leisure Profile and is an optional enrichment course for other students. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of select aspects of sport, entertainment, and/or leisure in the ancient world. Employing different types of ancient evidence, this course will focus on exploring and analysing social, cultural, political, economic, military, and/or religious aspects of sport, entertainment, and/or leisure in select societies and cultures of the ancient world. Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of ancient sport, entertainment, and/or leisure on the modern world.  

332-E02-LE In Search of the Greeks (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In Search of the Greeks is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of ancient Greek civilization. This course will explore the development of ancient Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Employing different types of ancient evidence, participants in the present course will explore and analyse the major religious, cultural, social, economic, military, and/or political elements of ancient Greek civilization. Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of the ancient Greek civilization on the modern world.    

332-E03-LE In Search of the Romans (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In Search of the Romans is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of ancient Roman civilization. Employing different types of ancient evidence, participants in the present course will examine and analyse the major religious, cultural, social, economic, military, and/or political factors which enabled Rome to expand from a small town into a vast empire governing diverse peoples, spanning the period from the foundation of the city of Rome (753 BCE) to the Crisis of the Third Century (235-284 CE). Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of the ancient Roman civilization on the modern world. 

Psychology
350-010-LE Introduction to Psychology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is an introduction to the discipline of psychology and highlights the contributions it has made to the understanding of human beings. As such, it will introduce students to the main perspectives, schools of thought, and the principal methodological approaches to the study of human behaviour and mental processes.  It is a required course in all social science profiles and serves as a prerequisite for all enrichment level Psychology courses. 

350-E01-LE Psychology of Mental Health (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Psychology of Mental Health is a required enrichment level psychology course for students of the Psychology and Society Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. While analyzing mental health from a holistic body/mind perspective, students will learn to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy behaviours and recognize the forces that undermine physical and mental health. Students will also learn about psychological disorders and the therapies that help those in need.  

350-E02-LE Psychology and Crime (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology and Crime is a required enrichment-level psychology course for students of the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. The course is designed to provide a broad overview of the psychological study of crime and criminal behaviour. A number of topics related to the various aspects of crime and the judicial process will be investigated.  

350-E03-LE Psychology of Sport, Exercise, and Leisure (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Psychology of Sport, Exercise, and Leisure is a required enrichment level course for students of the Sports and Leisure Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students This course will present an introduction to the psychology of sport, exercise, and leisure. Students will learn about concepts, theories, and models pertaining to sport and exercise behaviour. It will examine psychological interventions to improve sport performance and exercise adherence and address a variety of sport, leisure, and exercise psychology topics.  

350-E04-LE Psychology of Human Sexuality (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Human Sexuality is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will analyze the biological, psychological, and sociocultural key dimensions of human sexuality while exploring its emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physical nature. The course will also examine myths, taboos, and misguided beliefs about this central aspect of human identity.  

350-E05-LE Human Relations and Communication (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Human Relations and Communication is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will learn about the factors which foster or inhibit successful personal interactions and communication. Students will have the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge in various experiential exercises.  

350-E06-LE Cognitive Psychology (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Cognitive Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will be introduced to cognitive processes, such as attention, memory, language, decision-making, and thinking. Students will gain insight into the fundamental role of cognition in the human realities studied.

350-E07-LE Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Industrial and Organizational Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. This course will present an introduction to the psychological study of human behaviour in organizations and the workplace. Topics will center around analyzing principles of individual, group, and organizational behaviour, and the application of this knowledge to issues at work.   

350-E08-LE Psychology of Music (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Music is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. This course will present an introduction to the psychological study of music. It will address the questions of what music is, how we perceive it, and how it impacts us as human beings. 

350-E09-LE Social Psychology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Social Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will develop a basic understanding of the history, methods, and principal concepts of social psychology. The students will gain insights into how behaviour is influenced by social variables and processes.  

350-E10-LE Psychology of Development (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Development is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will analyze human development throughout the lifespan - from the womb to the tomb. Students will learn how the basic concepts, principles and theories that describe the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial changes that occur are woven together.

Economics
383-010-LE Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will be introduced to the main economic questions that a society must answer and to the main techniques that societies use to answer these questions. Students will learn the principal economic goals of society, why they are important, and how performance in achieving these goals is measured. This course also familiarises students with the basic model of how the macroeconomy functions; this model will be presented in a general form and then in more detail with extensive use of graphs.  Students will also learn the ways in which a market economy is vulnerable to failure in achieving its main macroeconomic goals, and some of the government policy tools that can be used to rectify problems in the economy, such as monetary or fiscal policies.  

383-E01-LE Microeconomics: Behaviors of Decision Takers (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Microeconomics: Behaviours of Decision Takers is a required enrichment level course in the Commerce Profile. It provides students with an opportunity to expand their knowledge in the Economics discipline and build on the knowledge and skills gained in Introduction to Economics, focusing more on the role consumers and firms play in the Economy. Students will analyze how individuals' behavior in decision-making can influence the allocation of resources and prices in markets, with the use of concepts such as Elasticity, Utility theory, Diminishing marginal utility, Opportunity costs, and Extensions of the Supply and Demand model.   

383-E02-LE Advanced Global Economics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Advanced Global Economics is a required enrichment level course for students of the Global Studies Profile (no math option) and an optional enrichment course for other students. Students will build on the skills and techniques learned in Introduction to Economics. Students will analyze the history of international trade and the evolution of the main ideas of trade theory. Students will learn how to explain the principle of comparative advantage and apply it to cases of voluntary exchange. Students will apply supply and demand diagrams and the concepts of producers’ surplus and consumers’ surplus to the analysis of the gains and losses from trade, as well as the gains and losses associated with different barriers to trade. 

383-E03-LE The Economics of Crime (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will provide an overview of core issues related to the economics of crime. Economic principles can explain every part of the criminal justice system and many of the motivations behind criminal acts. Laws create incentives for people to act in certain ways. Within an economic framework, the course will consider the ways in which social programs and other social conditions such as education, poverty, family structure, and even environmental factors affect crime.   

383-E04-LE Economic Issues (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Economic Issues is an enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will learn how to apply economic theories to analyse issues related to the market, globalization, national debt, the environment, and business.      

Students will explore both sides of issues that pertain to the Canadian and international economic environment. This course will cover topics such as extensions of supply and demand curves, Producers and Consumers' Behaviors facing Uncertainties, Fiscal Policies, Budget Deficit and National Debt, Growth and Inequalities, Globalization, Environmental Economics, and Global warming.    

Political Science
385-010-LE Introduction to Political Science (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The purpose of Introduction to Political Science is to introduce students to the study of political science. Through the lens of this social science discipline, students are to become familiar with the pillars of political decision-making in their communities. Politics being an intrinsic element of life in society in the 21st century, this course equips students to appreciate the basic workings of political power struggles.   

To that effect, students will develop a political science vocabulary covering the basic terminology of power, authority, and legitimacy. They will also get acquainted with the major schools of thoughts and will develop an understanding for the dynamic of political institutions and be able to identify the great variety of political actors that exist.   

This study will be paired up with a critical vision of political events that ultimately demands from students to identify in current events who are the holders of power, describe how they yield that power, and what ends they serve.  

385-E01-LE Criminal Justice (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Criminal Justice is a required enrichment level course in the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course will focus on the Canadian criminal justice system and its key components: the police, court, and correction institutions. In doing so, students will study the foundations of criminal law and of the Canadian constitution, the effects of the federal distribution of power on the system, and the importance of courts in a democratic regime. Comparison with elements of other countries’ criminal justice systems will be drawn out to assist students in their studies. The course will also explore contemporary issues and analyze classic court cases that form the backbone of the Canadian criminal justice system.  

385-E02-LE World Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

World Politics is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. The course will familiarize students with the central theories, concepts, and debates in the field of world politics, and highlight the key actors and events that influenced the development and relationships that characterize the world system today. The course will apply theories in the study of world politics to study a series of topics relevant to world politics. The course will give importance to discussions on current events that will help shed light on the global networks of power and the political dynamics between international state actors and transnational non-state actors that transcend political borders. Ultimately, the course encourages students to generate critical and informed views on the most pressing issues within the world system and enables them to identify political priorities for collective action based on their expanded knowledge and understanding of global politics. 

385-E03-LE Comparative Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Comparative Politics is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. In this course, students will analyze the fundamental concepts of state, government, regime, society, and the economy as well as the ideals of freedom and equality. These concepts will be examined with some historical background and explored with a comparative approach spanning over several countries. The analysis of contemporary issues like democratization, wealth inequality, religious fundamentalism, political culture, and political violence will be necessary to the understanding and critical assessment of these fundamental concepts. 

385-E04-LE Global Development (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Global Development is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. In this course, students will explore the idea that societies and countries have different levels of political, economic, and human development on a global scale. Through the study of a variety of development issues, students will further their understanding of the unequal power relations between the West and the rest of the world, challenge the notion of a single development path, and acknowledge the diversity of cultural perspectives and priorities. 

385-E05-LE Identity Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Identity Politics is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course will explore the meaning and examine the role that identity plays in politics and political outcomes and draw on current relevant examples and issues at the national and global level to understand how and why identities are so central in motivating individuals’ political behavior and the state’s response to it. Students will analyze how different identity categories such as those based on race, class, religion, ethnicity, indigeneity, partisanship, national affiliation, sexual and gender identity, etc., influence the dynamics and organization of political systems, and the formation of public policy, political attitudes, values, and opinions. Through the study of contemporary issues, students will evaluate how identities are experienced politically in particular contexts and how they come to shape the way individuals choose to participate in politics, how they mobilize to challenge or safeguard dominant ideas about Justice, and how states engage, or not, with the political claims of both privileged and oppressed identity groups. 

385-E06-LE War, Conflict, and Violence (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

War, Conflict, and Violence is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course will explore the origins, development, and consequences of armed conflicts and violent upheavals. Students will become familiar with the typology of revolutions, rebellions, terrorism, coups, guerilla warfare, class struggle, civil war, war, ethnic conflict, and genocide. Through the study of specific incarnations of political violence and current or long-standing conflicts, students will further their understanding of the means by which those who rule the world maintain their power, how people have fought for freedom and equality, and how conflicts result in a broad array of human casualties such as victims of sexual violence, internally displaced people, refugees, lost generations, etc. 

385-E07-LE Sexuality, Gender, and Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sexuality, Gender, and Politics is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course examines sex, gender, and politics with a particular emphasis on questions of power, oppression, representation, and bodily autonomy. We will consider the ways sexuality and gender are informed by— and challenge—key political ideas such as freedoms, rights, and justice. An intersectional feminist approach will guide much of the course’s analysis. We will study conceptual and practical problems through the investigation of contemporary issues and policy questions related to, among others, sexual and gender-based violence, access to sexual and reproductive healthcare, sex work, discrimination against LGBTQIA2S+ communities, barriers to education and the workplace, etc., and profile people and movements involved in the advancement of gender and sexual equality and justice. 

385-E08-LE Environmental Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Environmental Politics is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will examine the actors and dynamics associated with environmentalism understood as a broad political ideology and social movement with a variety of perspectives about the causes of environmental problems and the best way to deal with these problems. Through the study of the numerous environmental problems the world faces, students will further their understanding of humanity’s complicated relationship with nature, the limits of economic growth, and the roles that political actors can play in protecting the natural environment and ensuring that it can sustain all forms of life. 

385-E09-LE Law, Power, and the State (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Law, Power, and the State is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course will primarily investigate state-made laws in a Canadian context. The origin of laws, civil and common law traditions, constitutional, civil, corporate, and criminal law, as well as domestic and international laws, will be analyzed. Institutions pertinent to the development of laws and adjudication over legal matters will be examined. The course will also provide a critical assessment of state law with the exploration of other competing norms from cultural, religious, or aboriginal institutions. 

Sociology
387-010-LE Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course introduces students to sociology, one of the founding disciplines of the social sciences. While going over the original contributions of sociology’s classic and contemporary authors, students progressively acquire a conceptual “toolbox” that will prove useful throughout their studies in the Social Science Program. As they discover the main notions and concepts in the discipline, students learn to see public issues as diverse as mental health, inequalities, and crime, in a new light.  

Why are things the way they are? Who gains, and who doesn’t? Is change possible? As it explores inconvenient facts and perspectives, this course fosters students’ intellectual curiosity and gives them various tools and reasons to engage in Quebec society. 

387-E01-LE Sociology of Deviance and Crime (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sociology of Deviance and Crime is a required enrichment level course in the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course situates the study of crime in the larger sociological approach to deviance and social regulation.  From this perspective, it examines the ways in which the cultural categories of crime and its punishment are products of concrete societies and contexts.  Analyzing classical and contemporary theories, students gain sociological insight into the origins of deviance and crime, including such issues as marginalization, discrimination, and social inequality.  

387-E02-LE Sociology of Health and Wellbeing (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sociology of Health and Wellbeing is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. Approaching health in the broad sense, this course proposes to examine health from a sociological perspective, revealing the normative and institutional frameworks through which societies define health/illness, clean/unclean, life/death, etc.  Students gain insight into the ways in which these structures shape attitudes, actions, and interactions.  The course also equips students to think critically about the individualization of mental, physical, and spiritual health, revealing the importance of material and social factors.  

387-E03-LE The Great Transformation of Societies (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Great Transformation of Societies is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. This course looks at the dizzying social changes brought upon traditional societies by the maelstrom of capitalism and modernity over the last few centuries. By the end of this course, students should be able to think critically about how industrialization, state-building, and competitive markets have undermined previous social structures and are fundamentally altering humankind's social relations.  

387-E04-LE Critical Study of Media and Public Opinion (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Critical Study of Media and Public Opinion is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. This course explores the role of mass media, social media, and the culture industry in communicating ideological messages and symbols to the population while fulfilling the functions of entertainment and information. By the end of this course, students should be able to think critically about how the inequalities of wealth and power that surround cultural production shape public opinion and legitimize values, beliefs, and codes of behavior.    

387-E05-LE Marginalized Voices and Identities (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Marginalized Voices and Identities is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. This course explores the complex phenomenon of social inequalities as they pertain to gender, social class, ethnicity, and more. Students learn about the dynamics of power, privilege, and marginalization in contemporary societies. The concept of social identity is explored in relation to people’s position in society’s structure of power (political, economic, and symbolic). The intersections of various inequalities lead the students to reflect on notions such as positionality, normativity, institutionalization, and social change, among others. 

387-E06-LE Social Issues: From Private Troubles to Collective Responses (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Social Issues: From Private Troubles to Collective Responses is a required enrichment level course in the Psychology and Society Profile and an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course aims to solidify students’ sociological outlook on a variety of contemporary social issues and debates. In light of some of sociology’s major contributions, students learn to analyze social issues critically, focusing on their social construction, the impacts of social inequalities, and the ways in which societies and institutions respond. Finally, through fieldwork, field trips, or immersion projects, students learn to apply some of sociology’s observation techniques in order to gain a more concrete understanding of social problems.  

Business Administration
401-100-LE Introduction to Business and Administration (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The course will provide students with a general understanding of all types of administrative duties and develop a broad vocabulary related to the field. Although the focus will be on businesses, the class will also address the distinctive needs of public, not-for-profit and other non-governmental organizations.  Attention will also be placed on the importance of clear, concise, and professional business report presentations, namely through the required term project.  

Students will be introduced to the overall internal operations of businesses, and they will come to appreciate that many, if not all, business functions (production, marketing, human resource, finance, and information technologies) are also a daily concern for not-for-profit organizations, even though the terminology may be different.   

401-E01-LE Principles of Financial Management (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Principles of Financial Management is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will build on the knowledge and skills acquired in Introduction to Business and Administration through a more in-depth study of the principles and methods of financial management. Students will learn to apply the basic finance concepts employed by individuals and organizations to real-life situations. After successfully completing this course, students will be able to: understand the nature of financing operations and apply financial management theory to real business situations; analyze financial results through the computation of various financial ratios, understand the basic mechanisms of the stock market, and evaluate the most relevant financing methods for a given organization.   

401-E02-LE Law in the Business Environment (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Law in the Business Environment is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will build on the knowledge and skills they gained in Introduction to Business and Administration. This course is structured to provide the student with a basic understanding of the nature, function, contribution, and influence of law in the context of the business environment, and the opportunity to develop legal, ethical, and analytical skills. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to: (1) demonstrate an understanding of the key legal terms, concepts, and theories used in the current business environment; (2) apply them to identify situations that have legal implications for business; and (3) demonstrate critical thinking skills by the use of appropriate strategies to analyze legal problems and evaluate solutions.  

401-E03-LE Marketing: Speaking to People’s Needs (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Marketing: Speaking to People’s Needs is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will enter a more in-depth study of the principles and methods of marketing. Students will learn how to apply the basic marketing concepts employed by individuals and organizations to real-life situations. After successfully completing this course, students will be able to: understand the nature of marketing and apply marketing theory to real business situations; analyze how marketing decisions are made in the current business environment; describe how consumer behaviour is affected by various factors; relate product strategy to the other variables of the marketing mix and analyze marketing cases.  

401-E04-LE The Business of Sport (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Business of Sport is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. People identify with "their people", their tribe. Tribes need heroes, and today's heroes are our sports figures. As such these figures and their activities undergo immense scrutiny and draw huge fan bases. People will spend their money and devote huge amounts of time to these groups, making them highly valuable businesses. This class will examine the business models that are viable in a sports environment and how they can be profitable, their contribution to society, and their ethical implications of them. 

401-E05-LE Next Level Business (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Next Level Business is a required enrichment level course for students of the Commerce Profile and is an optional enrichment course for other students. This class will take the principals learned in Introduction to Business and Administration in order to take the understanding of students to the next level. Students will revisit the concepts of administration and organizational activities to see real-world applications of theory and analyse the successes and failures of various organizations. From the NGO to the fortune 500, from municipalities to ministries, humans endeavour to administer organizations and corporations to succeed in advancing human society using: Marketing, Operations Management, Human Resources, Finance, and I.T. we will see how various structures are administered and deliver value to clients, key partners and do so in a financially viable fashion that ultimately advances human society.   

401-E06-LE Management: Human Resources and Financial Tools (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Management: Human Resources and Financial Tools is an optional enrichment level course in the Social Science Program. In this course students will build on the skills and knowledge they gained in Introduction to Business and Administration. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the main methods and principles of the effective management of human, material, and capital resources. Students will apply the principles of management theory to typical situations in small and medium-sized businesses, as well as charitable, not-for-profit, and other organizations in society. Through a combination of theory and practical applications, they will learn how to analyze management as a process. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the main concepts and principles of management theory; to analyze the functions of management and its role in organizations and in society; and to apply appropriate management practices to real-world situations. 

University Pre-requisites
101-0U1-LE The Biology of Behaviour (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Social interactions, mental disorders, and our reactions to the external environment – these topics bring about the question of nature versus nurture. Understanding the role of biological systems can help us make sense of the complexity of human behavior. In this course, we will explore the role of the nervous and endocrine systems in the maintenance of internal physiological balance and the manifestation of behaviours. We will further investigate the topic of human behaviour by delving into the reproductive system and inheritance. 

201-0U1-LE Differential Calculus (3-2-3) 75 HRS / 2 2/3 CR

This course is an introduction to calculus. It is designed to enable students to understand the idea of limit and derivative of basic functions and to learn the principal concepts and methods of differential calculus. Students will also learn how to (1) formulate a functional model of certain business, economic, and other current human realities using the appropriate terminology and definitions, (2) solve problems based on functional models using differential calculus with rigorous mathematical reasoning, and (3) explain and interpret the results using appropriate language. Applications include problems involving rates of change, optimization, and demographics.

201-0U2-LE Integral Calculus (2-2-3) 60 HRS / 2 1/3 CR

In this course, students will build on the skills and knowledge they acquired in Differential Calculus. The aim is for students to understand the idea of the definite and indefinite integral and to learn the concepts and methods of integral calculus. Students will also learn how to (1) formulate a functional model of certain business, economic, and other current human realities using the appropriate terminology and definitions, (2) solve problems based on functional models using integral calculus with rigorous mathematical reasoning, and (3) explain and interpret the results using appropriate language. Applications include problems involving separable differential equations and bounded areas (Consumer’s Surplus, Producer’s surplus and equilibrium point, Lorenz curve, and Gini coefficient).

201-0U3-LE Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry (2-2-3) 60 HRS / 2 1/3 CR

In this course, students will be introduced to linear algebra and vector geometry. Students will acquire basic skills in manipulating vectors and matrices and learn the principal methods for solving linear systems of equations (Gaussian Elimination, Inverse Method) and inequalities (simplex method). They will also learn how to (1) formulate a linear model of certain business, economic, and other current human realities using the appropriate terminology and definitions, (2) solve problems based on linear models with rigorous mathematical reasoning, and (3) explain and interpret the results using appropriate language. Applications include Leontief’s method, optimization problems, and Markov processes.  

360-0U1-LE Probability and Statistics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will build on the skills and knowledge they acquired in Quantitative Analysis to the interpretation of data, statistical inference, and decision-making in the context of the social sciences. Students will learn how to choose and perform the statistical procedure that is appropriate to current human reality. Students will also learn how to work with probability concepts. Some simple ideas about chance will be introduced in the context of whether chance can be ruled out as an explanation for a relationship observed in a sample or whether bias may also be present.

NOTE: SOME COURSE TITLES MAY DIFFER SLIGHTLY ON STUDENTS' TRANSCRIPTS; PLEASE REFER TO COURSE NUMBERS.

GRADUATE EXIT PROFILE

 

The Graduate Exit Profile constitutes the local interpretation of the general aims and goals of the Social Science Program. It is defined by sixteen attributes students graduating from the program are expected to possess. The Graduate Profile figures prominently in the formulation of the criteria according to which the Program evaluates students’ Comprehensive Assessment. The essential attributes of the Graduate Exit Profile are: 

 

Academic Knowledge  Scientific Research 
Goal: Integrate and apply skills and knowledge acquired in the Social Science Program to study human phenomena from a trans-disciplinary approach. 

 

  • Recognize, compare, and integrate different fields of knowledge in the social sciences. 
  • Differentiate between and apply various theoretical and methodological frameworks particular to the disciplines of the social sciences.  
  • Explain the main concepts, theories, laws, models, and schools of thought (past and present) in the disciplines of the social sciences.  
Goal: Use research skills to access information from multiple sources; use critical thinking skills to evaluate and synthesize information in the form of conclusions, ideas, and opinions. 

 

  • Use technology as a research tool in qualitative and quantitative data interpretation. 
  • Use scientific methods in the social sciences to examine human phenomena at different scales from multiple disciplines.  
  • Use identified critical thinking skills independently and reflectively to master the basic rules of rational thought, critical discourse, and coherent argumentation.  
  • Demonstrate technological and media literacy. Show an understanding of the role of academic and non-academic sources in understanding the world. 
Communication  Citizenship 
Goal: Express ideas clearly and creatively in diverse ways through speech, writing and technologies. 

 

  • Read and comprehend material in diverse social science disciplines in English and French. 
  • Convey ideas, information, and concepts responsibly and coherently in both oral and written English and French.  
  • Articulate and defend an academic argument orally and in writing. 
  • Develop appropriate use of technologies to communicate orally and in writing.  
  • Apply proper academic formatting and value academic integrity.  
Goal: Recognize one’s role in world community issues with respect for diverse cultures and differing perspectives.  

 

  • Engage in respectful and collaborative activities with peers exploring diverse world views.  
  • Compare and contrast different points of view and perspectives. 
  • Evaluate important contemporary issues with special emphasis on the Quebec context and on the realities and perspectives of the First Nations and Inuit. 
  • Use effective life skills to improve and maintain mental and physical well-being.  

 

THE COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

 

The Comprehensive Assessment will serve to evaluate each graduating student’s attainment of the goals outlined in the Graduate Exit Profile and will be completed within the 300-400-LE Integrative Course). Within the scope of the Integrative Course, students will carry out a major original project, such as an academic research project or equivalent major assignment. This project will integrate the perspectives of three social science disciplines and will involve publicly sharing the results. Students will also critically reflect on the effects of their social science training on their role as students and citizens. The research project and associated reflections will serve as the basis of their Comprehensive Assessment, the purpose of which is to ensure that students have integrated the knowledge and skills required of the Social Science Program. 

 

The following Learning Outcomes of the Social Science Exit Profile will be assessed by the Comprehensive Assessment: 

 

  • Differentiate between and apply various theoretical and methodological frameworks particular to the disciplines of the social sciences. 
  • Explain the main concepts, theories, laws, models, and schools of thought (past and present) in the disciplines of the social sciences. 
  • Use technology as a research tool in qualitative and quantitative data interpretation. 
  • Use scientific methods in the social sciences to examine human phenomena at different scales from multiple disciplines. 
  • Evaluate important contemporary issues with special emphasis on the Quebec context and on the realities and perspectives of the First Nations and Inuit. 
  • Use effective life skills to improve and maintain mental and physical well-being. 

Sports and Leisure Profile (300.A1)

Also known as Sciences humaines – Profil sports et loisirs

💭 THIS PROGRAM IS FOR YOU IF…

  • You like to discuss, debate, and express your opinions 
  • You are interested in current events
  • You are interested in human realities and the challenges facing humanity
  • You want to think about solutions for the challenges facing humanity
  • You want to go to university
  • You like different perspectives and want to learn more about the disciplines of ancient civilizations, history, geography, economics, political science, psychology, and sociology
  • You would like to do a cross-cultural project

Program Description

 

The Social Science Program is an exciting pre-university program that provides students with a balanced education involving general and scientific learning in a variety of disciplines, thereby making it possible for them to understand and analyze human realities. This training will equip students with the necessary knowledge, regardless of profile, to pursue university studies in 100s of different programs (certain prerequisite courses may be required).  

 

Students may choose from one of five profiles: Criminology, Psychology and Society, Commerce, Global Studies, and Sports and Leisure.

 

The Psychology and Society, Commerce, Global Studies with Math, and Sports and Leisure with Math Profiles are all linked to specific university prerequisites and are intended to prepare students for those particular fields of study.

Profile Description

 

This profile allows students to explore significant social and academic issues related to sports and leisure in society and will support professional and academic aspirations and ensure a rigorous Social Science approach to the study of sports and related leisure activities from the ancient to the contemporary world. Three required enrichment courses include: Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World, Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure, and The Psychology of Sport, Exercise, and Leisure 

 

Students have the option to take one introductory-level course in Political Science, Business Administration, or Sociology which will serve as a pre-requisite for optional enrichment-level courses in semesters 3 and 4.  

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Overview

PREREQUISITES

Without Math
Secondary 4 Cultural, Social and Technical Mathematics Option
OR
Mathematics 416
With Math
Secondary 5 Technical and Scientific Mathematics Option
OR
Secondary 5 Science Mathematics Option
OR
Mathematics 526

OBJECTIVES

 

By the end of the Social Science program, students will be able to: 

  • Explain human realities by using the main facts, concepts, theories, models, and approaches specific to the social science disciplines; 
  • Examine various issues related to citizenship in today’s world; 
  • Use academic work tools and methods as well as the technology needed to successfully pursue their studies; 
  • Demonstrate scientific intellect and intellectual curiosity, and think critically; 
  • Experiment with social science research methods; 
  • Convey their ideas in a clear and organized manner in the language of instruction and use information resources in their second language in the context of their social science studies; 
  • Demonstrate that the subject-specific and methodological learning required to study human realities has been integrated. 

PROGRAM GRID ➡️ Certificate Holders

Total courses: 29
Total credits: 58

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge 300-100-LE
Introduction to Geography 320-010-LE
Introduction to Ancient Civilizations  332-010-LE
Introduction to Psychology  350-010-LE 
Physical Education 101 or 102  109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ 
Introduction to College English  603-101-MQ
French – General  602-MQ
Complementary Course   

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods  300-010-LE
Introduction to History  330-010-LE
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics 383-010-LE
Introduction option of choice*  
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
English for Social Science  603-BEK-LE 
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application 345-101-MQ 

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis  360-010-LE 
Thematic Issue (choice)  300-E01-LE to 300-E07-LE
Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure 320-E02-LE
Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World  332-E01-LE
Enrichment option of choice**
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle    109-103-MQ
Literary Genres or Literary Themes  
603-102-MQ or 
603-103-MQ 
Humanities – World Views    345-102-MQ 

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE
Psychology of Sport, Exercise and Leisure  350-E03-LE
Enrichment option of choice**
Humanities – Ethical Issues  345-BE
Literary Genres or Literary Themes  603-102-MQ or 
603-103-MQ
French – Specific    602-BE
Complementary Course  

PROGRAM GRID ➡️ Non-Certificate Holders

Total courses: 29
Total credits: 58

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge 300-100-LE
Introduction to Geography 320-010-LE
Introduction to Ancient Civilizations  332-010-LE
Introduction to Psychology  350-010-LE 
Physical Education 101 or 102  109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ 
Introduction to College English  603-101-MQ
Oeuvres narratives et écriture 602-UF0MQ
Complementary Course   

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods  300-010-LE
Introduction to History  330-010-LE
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics 383-010-LE
Introduction option of choice*  
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
English for Social Science  603-BEK-LE 
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application 345-101-MQ 

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis  360-010-LE 
Thematic Issue (choice)  300-E01-LE to 300-E07-LE
Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure 320-E02-LE
Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World  332-E01-LE
Enrichment option of choice*
Poésie, théâtre et écriture 602-UF1-MQ
Literary Genres or Literary Themes  
603-102-MQ or 
603-103-MQ 
Humanities – World Views    345-102-MQ 

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE
Psychology of Sport, Exercise and Leisure  350-E03-LE
Enrichment option of choice**
Humanities – Ethical Issues  345-BE
Literary Genres or Literary Themes  603-102-MQ or 
603-103-MQ
Comparaison d’oeuvres littéraires 602-UF2-MQ
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle  109-103-MQ

PROGRAM GRID WITH MATH ➡️ Certificate Holders

Total courses: 30
Total credits: 57 1/3

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge 300-100-LE
Introduction to Geography 320-010-LE
Introduction to Ancient Civilizations  332-010-LE
Differential Calculus    201-0U1-LE
Physical Education 101 or 102  109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ 
Introduction to College English  603-101-MQ
French – General  602-MQ

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods  300-010-LE
Introduction to History  330-010-LE
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics 383-010-LE
Introduction to Psychology 350-010-LE 
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
English for Social Science  603-BEK-LE 
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application 345-101-MQ 

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis  360-010-LE 
Thematic Issue (choice)  300-E01-LE to 300-E07-LE
Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure 320-E02-LE
Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World  332-E01-LE
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle    109-103-MQ
Literary Genres or Literary Themes   603-102-MQ or 
603-103-MQ 
Humanities – World Views  345-102-MQ 
Complementary Course 

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE
Psychology of Sport, Exercise and Leisure  350-E03-LE
Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry 201-0U3-LE
Humanities – Ethical Issues  345-BE
Literary Genres or Literary Themes  603-102-MQ or 
603-103-MQ
French – Specific    602-BE
Complementary Course  

PROGRAM GRID WITH MATH ➡️ Non-Certificate Holders

Total courses: 30
Total credits: 57 1/3

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge 300-100-LE
Introduction to Geography 320-010-LE
Introduction to Ancient Civilizations  332-010-LE
Differential Calculus    201-0U1-LE
Physical Education 101 or 102  109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ 
Introduction to College English  603-101-MQ
Oeuvres narratives et écriture 602-UF0-MQ

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods  300-010-LE
Introduction to History  330-010-LE
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics 383-010-LE
Introduction to Psychology 350-010-LE 
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
English for Social Science  603-BEK-LE 
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application 345-101-MQ 

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis  360-010-LE 
Thematic Issue (choice)  300-E01-LE to 300-E07-LE
Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure 320-E02-LE
Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World  332-E01-LE
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle    109-103-MQ
Literary Genres or Literary Themes   603-102-MQ or 
603-103-MQ 
Humanities – World Views  345-102-MQ 
 Poésie, théâtre et écriture  602-UF1-MQ

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE
Psychology of Sport, Exercise and Leisure  350-E03-LE
Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry 201-0U3-LE
Humanities – Ethical Issues  345-BE
Literary Genres or Literary Themes  603-102-MQ or 
603-103-MQ
Comparaison d’oeuvres littéraires 602-UF2-MQ
Complementary Course  

*In the first year, students in the Sports and Leisure Profile select ONE Social Science introduction level option from Business Administration, Sociology, and Political Science.

 

*In the second year, students select TWO enrichment-level Social Science courses from disciplines opened in the first year with a maximum of two second-level courses from any one discipline.

COURSES

Methodology and Integration Courses
300-100-LE Academic Skills and Knowledge (2-1-2) 45 HRS / 1 1/2 CR

This course is designed to teach students the fundamental academic skills of researching, reading, and writing in the social sciences. Students are taught how to search for, comprehend and synthesize academic sources in the context of social science research. Throughout this process, they will recognize the various disciplinary perspectives that compose the social sciences and their respective perspectives on a diversity of topics. As they progress through the course, students will gain skills related to searching academic databases, critical evaluation of information, teamwork, academic writing, and oral communication. 

300-010-LE Qualitative Methods (2-2-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to teach students how to distinguish between scientific and non-scientific knowledge, to learn about basic ethics in social science research, to work in teams, to apply a scientific approach to knowledge in the social sciences, and to understand the limits of social science research. They will be introduced to a variety of qualitative approaches used in the social sciences. Using qualitative tools, they will collect, analyze, and interpret data. Students will put into practice qualitative approaches to social science research and will produce a research report that documents their methods and results.  

360-010-LE Quantitative Analysis (2-2-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to teach students to use statistical tools to process and describe data related to the field of social sciences. Students are taught a number of statistical and data collection techniques to understand the possibilities and limitations of quantitative analysis. Learning these statistical techniques will help students to describe and interpret human realities. 

300-400-LE Integrative Course (1-3-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to demonstrate an integration of what students have learned in the social sciences. Within the scope of the course, students will carry out a major original project, such as an academic research paper or equivalent major assignment. This project will integrate the perspectives of three social science disciplines and will involve sharing results with others. Students will also critically reflect on the effects of their social science training on their role as student and citizen. 

Thematic Issue Courses
300-E01-LE The Environment (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores issues in the environment demonstrating both the topical importance of the environment, as well as the interconnectedness of disciplines across the social sciences. This course is designed to equip students with a critical perspective on the roles of individuals and communities in shaping the environment, leading to an appreciation of the way they perceive the world and their place in it. 

300-E02-LE Indigenous Realities (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores the realities of Indigenous peoples in North America and around the world through a variety of academic perspectives. Each discipline may offer a perspective in tandem with one or more other disciplines, demonstrating their interconnectedness across the social sciences. This course will investigate the lived experiences of Indigenous peoples, as well as the impacts of colonialism in its myriad forms. 

300-E03-LE Media and Technology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Using a variety of academic perspectives, this course explores issues related to media in society as well as the broader topic of technology. Students will analyze the role and power of technologies and media in society, building on multiple disciplines in the social sciences. This course is designed to equip students with media literacy skills and a critical perspective on science and communication, leading to a reflection on their own position as citizens, consumers, and producers of culture. 

300-E04-LE Globalization (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course explores issues of Globalization though a variety of academic perspectives in the social sciences. The consequences of an increasingly interconnected world on society and the environment are less and less in dispute. Each discipline can offer a perspective in tandem with one or more disciplines to analyze the different aspects of globalization. 

300-E05-LE Justice and Injustice (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course explores issues of Justice through a variety of academic perspectives in the social sciences. This course strives to go beyond personal understandings of justice and injustice to develop the student’s critical view of the theme. This will be achieved through the examination of relevant concepts and facts as they are defined and contextualized within selected social science disciplines pertinent to this course.  Using a variety of approaches and theories, students will apply a multidisciplinary approach in order to question, analyze and critically evaluate the different factors that contribute to the understanding of issues of Justice and Injustice. 

300-E06-LE Identity and Culture (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores issues dealing with identity and culture through a variety of academic perspectives. Each discipline can offer a perspective in tandem with at least one or more other disciplines to analyze diverse identities and cultures and explore the concepts, approaches, and theories relevant to the theme. 

300-E07-LE Money Matters (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores the idea of money as a medium of exchange, a store of value, and a source of information amongst others. Each discipline can offer a different perspective contributing to the analysis of issues pertaining to money thereby demonstrating the interconnectedness of the social sciences. 

Geography
320-010-LE Introduction to Geography (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Geography is, in the broadest sense, an education for life and for living. Learning through geography helps us all to be more socially and environmentally sensitive, informed, and responsible citizens. Geography is an all-encompassing discipline that seeks to understand the world —its human and physical phenomena —through an understanding of place and location. Geographers seek to understand where things are found, why they are present in those places and how they diffuse through space. Also, Geography studies why places and the people who live in them develop and change in particular ways. In this course students will develop their geographic perspective to be able to understand the world around them, to interpret occurrences in geographic space and to recognise viable solutions.  

320-E01-LE Globe-Trotter: The Geography of Travel and Tourism (2-1-3) 90 HRS /2 CR

The study of Geography, by its very nature, covers a wide range of contemporary issues. Travel and tourism have enabled people to access the remote, for better and for worse. This course will build on knowledge obtained in Introduction to Geography to analyze how the environment both influences, and is influenced by, economic, political, and cultural aspects of travel and tourism.  

320-E02-LE Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure is a required enrichment level course in the Sports and Leisure Profile and is an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course will be dedicated to the observation of human phenomena through the lens of geography-specific to the theme of sports and leisure. Given the nature of the competency (0PRA) students will learn to examine and analyze cultural landscapes in an applied context.   

320-E03-LE What on Earth (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

What on Earth is a required enrichment level course in the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment level course to other students. This course will be dedicated to the study of human realities through the lens of geography. It will take a regional approach and examine how human societies and physical environments are deeply connected and constantly changing. Given the nature of the competency (0PRA), students will observe and analyze the diversity of human and natural realities in an applied context.  

320-E04-LE The Global Casino: An Approach to Environmental Issues (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Money and economics underlie environmental issues and environmental issues involve winners and losers. Building on their skills obtained in Introduction to Geography students will apply their theoretical knowledge of the principles of human and physical geography to an analysis of the problems caused by human interaction with natural systems and the hopes for solutions.  

History
330-010-LE Introduction to History (3-1-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

Introduction to History allows students to develop historical knowledge by focusing on the fundamental events and actors of world history with a particular emphasis on the 15th century until today. It introduces students to the study of history as a social science. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to apply the basic concepts used in the study of history, understand the importance of historical documents, analyze at least one global phenomenon from a historical perspective and identify various viewpoints as they relate to a specific historical event. 

330-E01-LE The Contemporary World (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Contemporary World is a required enrichment level course for students of the Global Studies Profile (no math option) and an optional enrichment course for other students. It builds upon the concepts and events examined in Introduction to History. It will examine the historical context of contemporary issues with a particular emphasis on significant global events.  

330-E02-LE History of the United States (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of the United States is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. It serves as an overview of the developments and forces which have determined the course of the United States. Students will build on the knowledge and skills they gained in Introduction to History to do an analysis of America’s rise from its colonial beginnings to becoming a superpower. The students will explore the American dimension of such issues as democracy, racism, revolution, and capitalism.

330-E03-LE History of Canada (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of Canada is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. Students will examine themes in Canadian history from pre-contact Indigenous societies to the present. They will examine emerging scholarship that situates Canada in a world-historical context, as befits a country with a long history of immigration, with an emphasis on the complex dynamics affecting the interactions of multiple cultures (Indigenous, European, and later African, Asian, and other).   

330-E04-LE The Middle Ages in Europe (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Middle Ages in Europe is an optional enrichment level course in the Social Science Program. The course examines major historical developments in the Western world from Late Antiquity to the period of early attempts at global imperial expansion and settlement in 1500. Students will explore several concepts and events that echo those found in contemporary history (e.g., secularism and religion, the nation-state, and pandemic outbreaks).  

330-E05-LE History of Sports (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of Sports is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. It examines the development of sports from the Middle Ages to the present. It will focus on important events that influence the development of sports. Students will become aware of how issues of race, class, gender, and politics played an important role in how sports developed over time.   

330-E06-LE Society and Environment in History (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Society and Environment in History is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. The course examines the environmental impacts of human society from the origins of agriculture to the contemporary period. It explores historical debates over the causes of ecological disasters, societal collapses, as well as environmental successes. Themes can be explored from local, regional, national, and global perspectives. 

330-E07-LE Indigeneity and Settler-Colonialism (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Indigeneity and Settler-Colonialism is a second-level non-compulsory course in the Social Science Program. The course explores multiple instances of settler-colonialism selected from the late fifteenth century to the contemporary era. Students will examine its effects on Indigenous peoples, with an emphasis on the Indigenous perspectives of those encounters. North America and at least one other region (e.g., South America, Oceania, Polynesia, or elsewhere) will be examined. 

330-E08-LE Archives on Trial (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Archives on Trial is a required enrichment level course for students of the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. It examines legal culture, both formal and informal, through historical archives. It will examine the historical context of criminological issues through the lens of primary source material, with a particular emphasis on case studies.  

330-E09-LE Film as History (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Film as History is a second-level non-compulsory course in the Social Science Program. The course provides cinematic portrayals of history and examines them as historical arguments, given that visual literacy skills have become as essential as traditional literacy skills in understanding historical knowledge and perspectives. The course would examine a central theme (e.g., empire, gender, social classes, Cold War cinema, historical mythologies) with attention to films as an influence on historical perspectives and as cultural artifacts. 

Ancient Civilizations
332-010-LE Introduction to Ancient Civilizations (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course focuses on two major fields of study: archaeology and history. In this class, students will first learn the methods used by archaeologists and historians to reconstruct the past. These methods will then be used to explore three major developments in our human past: 1. The appearance of Homo sapiens roughly 200,000 years ago; 2. The Neolithic Revolution roughly 10,000 years ago and the origins of agriculture; 3. The rise of civilizations in Mesopotamia (c.c. 4000 BCE), Egypt (c.c. 3200 BCE), and Greece (c.c. 1500 BCE). Within each of these broad subject areas, case studies will be used to demonstrate how archaeologists and historians reconstruct the past. Students will also use these methods to research a case study independently from any ancient culture of their choice. 

332-E01-LE Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World is a required enrichment level course for students of the Sports and Leisure Profile and is an optional enrichment course for other students. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of select aspects of sport, entertainment, and/or leisure in the ancient world. Employing different types of ancient evidence, this course will focus on exploring and analysing social, cultural, political, economic, military, and/or religious aspects of sport, entertainment, and/or leisure in select societies and cultures of the ancient world. Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of ancient sport, entertainment, and/or leisure on the modern world.  

332-E02-LE In Search of the Greeks (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In Search of the Greeks is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of ancient Greek civilization. This course will explore the development of ancient Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Employing different types of ancient evidence, participants in the present course will explore and analyse the major religious, cultural, social, economic, military, and/or political elements of ancient Greek civilization. Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of the ancient Greek civilization on the modern world.    

332-E03-LE In Search of the Romans (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In Search of the Romans is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of ancient Roman civilization. Employing different types of ancient evidence, participants in the present course will examine and analyse the major religious, cultural, social, economic, military, and/or political factors which enabled Rome to expand from a small town into a vast empire governing diverse peoples, spanning the period from the foundation of the city of Rome (753 BCE) to the Crisis of the Third Century (235-284 CE). Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of the ancient Roman civilization on the modern world. 

Psychology
350-010-LE Introduction to Psychology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is an introduction to the discipline of psychology and highlights the contributions it has made to the understanding of human beings. As such, it will introduce students to the main perspectives, schools of thought, and the principal methodological approaches to the study of human behaviour and mental processes.  It is a required course in all social science profiles and serves as a prerequisite for all enrichment level Psychology courses. 

350-E01-LE Psychology of Mental Health (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Psychology of Mental Health is a required enrichment level psychology course for students of the Psychology and Society Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. While analyzing mental health from a holistic body/mind perspective, students will learn to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy behaviours and recognize the forces that undermine physical and mental health. Students will also learn about psychological disorders and the therapies that help those in need.  

350-E02-LE Psychology and Crime (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology and Crime is a required enrichment-level psychology course for students of the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. The course is designed to provide a broad overview of the psychological study of crime and criminal behaviour. A number of topics related to the various aspects of crime and the judicial process will be investigated.  

350-E03-LE Psychology of Sport, Exercise, and Leisure (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Psychology of Sport, Exercise, and Leisure is a required enrichment level course for students of the Sports and Leisure Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students This course will present an introduction to the psychology of sport, exercise, and leisure. Students will learn about concepts, theories, and models pertaining to sport and exercise behaviour. It will examine psychological interventions to improve sport performance and exercise adherence and address a variety of sport, leisure, and exercise psychology topics.  

350-E04-LE Psychology of Human Sexuality (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Human Sexuality is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will analyze the biological, psychological, and sociocultural key dimensions of human sexuality while exploring its emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physical nature. The course will also examine myths, taboos, and misguided beliefs about this central aspect of human identity.  

350-E05-LE Human Relations and Communication (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Human Relations and Communication is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will learn about the factors which foster or inhibit successful personal interactions and communication. Students will have the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge in various experiential exercises.  

350-E06-LE Cognitive Psychology (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Cognitive Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will be introduced to cognitive processes, such as attention, memory, language, decision-making, and thinking. Students will gain insight into the fundamental role of cognition in the human realities studied.

350-E07-LE Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Industrial and Organizational Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. This course will present an introduction to the psychological study of human behaviour in organizations and the workplace. Topics will center around analyzing principles of individual, group, and organizational behaviour, and the application of this knowledge to issues at work.   

350-E08-LE Psychology of Music (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Music is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. This course will present an introduction to the psychological study of music. It will address the questions of what music is, how we perceive it, and how it impacts us as human beings. 

350-E09-LE Social Psychology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Social Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will develop a basic understanding of the history, methods, and principal concepts of social psychology. The students will gain insights into how behaviour is influenced by social variables and processes.  

350-E10-LE Psychology of Development (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Development is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will analyze human development throughout the lifespan - from the womb to the tomb. Students will learn how the basic concepts, principles and theories that describe the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial changes that occur are woven together.

Economics
383-010-LE Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will be introduced to the main economic questions that a society must answer and to the main techniques that societies use to answer these questions. Students will learn the principal economic goals of society, why they are important, and how performance in achieving these goals is measured. This course also familiarises students with the basic model of how the macroeconomy functions; this model will be presented in a general form and then in more detail with extensive use of graphs.  Students will also learn the ways in which a market economy is vulnerable to failure in achieving its main macroeconomic goals, and some of the government policy tools that can be used to rectify problems in the economy, such as monetary or fiscal policies.  

383-E01-LE Microeconomics: Behaviors of Decision Takers (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Microeconomics: Behaviours of Decision Takers is a required enrichment level course in the Commerce Profile. It provides students with an opportunity to expand their knowledge in the Economics discipline and build on the knowledge and skills gained in Introduction to Economics, focusing more on the role consumers and firms play in the Economy. Students will analyze how individuals' behavior in decision-making can influence the allocation of resources and prices in markets, with the use of concepts such as Elasticity, Utility theory, Diminishing marginal utility, Opportunity costs, and Extensions of the Supply and Demand model.   

383-E02-LE Advanced Global Economics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Advanced Global Economics is a required enrichment level course for students of the Global Studies Profile (no math option) and an optional enrichment course for other students. Students will build on the skills and techniques learned in Introduction to Economics. Students will analyze the history of international trade and the evolution of the main ideas of trade theory. Students will learn how to explain the principle of comparative advantage and apply it to cases of voluntary exchange. Students will apply supply and demand diagrams and the concepts of producers’ surplus and consumers’ surplus to the analysis of the gains and losses from trade, as well as the gains and losses associated with different barriers to trade. 

383-E03-LE The Economics of Crime (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will provide an overview of core issues related to the economics of crime. Economic principles can explain every part of the criminal justice system and many of the motivations behind criminal acts. Laws create incentives for people to act in certain ways. Within an economic framework, the course will consider the ways in which social programs and other social conditions such as education, poverty, family structure, and even environmental factors affect crime.   

383-E04-LE Economic Issues (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Economic Issues is an enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will learn how to apply economic theories to analyse issues related to the market, globalization, national debt, the environment, and business.      

Students will explore both sides of issues that pertain to the Canadian and international economic environment. This course will cover topics such as extensions of supply and demand curves, Producers and Consumers' Behaviors facing Uncertainties, Fiscal Policies, Budget Deficit and National Debt, Growth and Inequalities, Globalization, Environmental Economics, and Global warming.    

Political Science
385-010-LE Introduction to Political Science (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The purpose of Introduction to Political Science is to introduce students to the study of political science. Through the lens of this social science discipline, students are to become familiar with the pillars of political decision-making in their communities. Politics being an intrinsic element of life in society in the 21st century, this course equips students to appreciate the basic workings of political power struggles.   

To that effect, students will develop a political science vocabulary covering the basic terminology of power, authority, and legitimacy. They will also get acquainted with the major schools of thoughts and will develop an understanding for the dynamic of political institutions and be able to identify the great variety of political actors that exist.   

This study will be paired up with a critical vision of political events that ultimately demands from students to identify in current events who are the holders of power, describe how they yield that power, and what ends they serve.  

385-E01-LE Criminal Justice (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Criminal Justice is a required enrichment level course in the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course will focus on the Canadian criminal justice system and its key components: the police, court, and correction institutions. In doing so, students will study the foundations of criminal law and of the Canadian constitution, the effects of the federal distribution of power on the system, and the importance of courts in a democratic regime. Comparison with elements of other countries’ criminal justice systems will be drawn out to assist students in their studies. The course will also explore contemporary issues and analyze classic court cases that form the backbone of the Canadian criminal justice system.  

385-E02-LE World Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

World Politics is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. The course will familiarize students with the central theories, concepts, and debates in the field of world politics, and highlight the key actors and events that influenced the development and relationships that characterize the world system today. The course will apply theories in the study of world politics to study a series of topics relevant to world politics. The course will give importance to discussions on current events that will help shed light on the global networks of power and the political dynamics between international state actors and transnational non-state actors that transcend political borders. Ultimately, the course encourages students to generate critical and informed views on the most pressing issues within the world system and enables them to identify political priorities for collective action based on their expanded knowledge and understanding of global politics. 

385-E03-LE Comparative Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Comparative Politics is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. In this course, students will analyze the fundamental concepts of state, government, regime, society, and the economy as well as the ideals of freedom and equality. These concepts will be examined with some historical background and explored with a comparative approach spanning over several countries. The analysis of contemporary issues like democratization, wealth inequality, religious fundamentalism, political culture, and political violence will be necessary to the understanding and critical assessment of these fundamental concepts. 

385-E04-LE Global Development (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Global Development is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. In this course, students will explore the idea that societies and countries have different levels of political, economic, and human development on a global scale. Through the study of a variety of development issues, students will further their understanding of the unequal power relations between the West and the rest of the world, challenge the notion of a single development path, and acknowledge the diversity of cultural perspectives and priorities. 

385-E05-LE Identity Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Identity Politics is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course will explore the meaning and examine the role that identity plays in politics and political outcomes and draw on current relevant examples and issues at the national and global level to understand how and why identities are so central in motivating individuals’ political behavior and the state’s response to it. Students will analyze how different identity categories such as those based on race, class, religion, ethnicity, indigeneity, partisanship, national affiliation, sexual and gender identity, etc., influence the dynamics and organization of political systems, and the formation of public policy, political attitudes, values, and opinions. Through the study of contemporary issues, students will evaluate how identities are experienced politically in particular contexts and how they come to shape the way individuals choose to participate in politics, how they mobilize to challenge or safeguard dominant ideas about Justice, and how states engage, or not, with the political claims of both privileged and oppressed identity groups. 

385-E06-LE War, Conflict, and Violence (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

War, Conflict, and Violence is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course will explore the origins, development, and consequences of armed conflicts and violent upheavals. Students will become familiar with the typology of revolutions, rebellions, terrorism, coups, guerilla warfare, class struggle, civil war, war, ethnic conflict, and genocide. Through the study of specific incarnations of political violence and current or long-standing conflicts, students will further their understanding of the means by which those who rule the world maintain their power, how people have fought for freedom and equality, and how conflicts result in a broad array of human casualties such as victims of sexual violence, internally displaced people, refugees, lost generations, etc. 

385-E07-LE Sexuality, Gender, and Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sexuality, Gender, and Politics is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course examines sex, gender, and politics with a particular emphasis on questions of power, oppression, representation, and bodily autonomy. We will consider the ways sexuality and gender are informed by— and challenge—key political ideas such as freedoms, rights, and justice. An intersectional feminist approach will guide much of the course’s analysis. We will study conceptual and practical problems through the investigation of contemporary issues and policy questions related to, among others, sexual and gender-based violence, access to sexual and reproductive healthcare, sex work, discrimination against LGBTQIA2S+ communities, barriers to education and the workplace, etc., and profile people and movements involved in the advancement of gender and sexual equality and justice. 

385-E08-LE Environmental Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Environmental Politics is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will examine the actors and dynamics associated with environmentalism understood as a broad political ideology and social movement with a variety of perspectives about the causes of environmental problems and the best way to deal with these problems. Through the study of the numerous environmental problems the world faces, students will further their understanding of humanity’s complicated relationship with nature, the limits of economic growth, and the roles that political actors can play in protecting the natural environment and ensuring that it can sustain all forms of life. 

385-E09-LE Law, Power, and the State (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Law, Power, and the State is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course will primarily investigate state-made laws in a Canadian context. The origin of laws, civil and common law traditions, constitutional, civil, corporate, and criminal law, as well as domestic and international laws, will be analyzed. Institutions pertinent to the development of laws and adjudication over legal matters will be examined. The course will also provide a critical assessment of state law with the exploration of other competing norms from cultural, religious, or aboriginal institutions. 

Sociology
387-010-LE Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course introduces students to sociology, one of the founding disciplines of the social sciences. While going over the original contributions of sociology’s classic and contemporary authors, students progressively acquire a conceptual “toolbox” that will prove useful throughout their studies in the Social Science Program. As they discover the main notions and concepts in the discipline, students learn to see public issues as diverse as mental health, inequalities, and crime, in a new light.  

Why are things the way they are? Who gains, and who doesn’t? Is change possible? As it explores inconvenient facts and perspectives, this course fosters students’ intellectual curiosity and gives them various tools and reasons to engage in Quebec society. 

387-E01-LE Sociology of Deviance and Crime (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sociology of Deviance and Crime is a required enrichment level course in the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course situates the study of crime in the larger sociological approach to deviance and social regulation.  From this perspective, it examines the ways in which the cultural categories of crime and its punishment are products of concrete societies and contexts.  Analyzing classical and contemporary theories, students gain sociological insight into the origins of deviance and crime, including such issues as marginalization, discrimination, and social inequality.  

387-E02-LE Sociology of Health and Wellbeing (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sociology of Health and Wellbeing is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. Approaching health in the broad sense, this course proposes to examine health from a sociological perspective, revealing the normative and institutional frameworks through which societies define health/illness, clean/unclean, life/death, etc.  Students gain insight into the ways in which these structures shape attitudes, actions, and interactions.  The course also equips students to think critically about the individualization of mental, physical, and spiritual health, revealing the importance of material and social factors.  

387-E03-LE The Great Transformation of Societies (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Great Transformation of Societies is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. This course looks at the dizzying social changes brought upon traditional societies by the maelstrom of capitalism and modernity over the last few centuries. By the end of this course, students should be able to think critically about how industrialization, state-building, and competitive markets have undermined previous social structures and are fundamentally altering humankind's social relations.  

387-E04-LE Critical Study of Media and Public Opinion (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Critical Study of Media and Public Opinion is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. This course explores the role of mass media, social media, and the culture industry in communicating ideological messages and symbols to the population while fulfilling the functions of entertainment and information. By the end of this course, students should be able to think critically about how the inequalities of wealth and power that surround cultural production shape public opinion and legitimize values, beliefs, and codes of behavior.    

387-E05-LE Marginalized Voices and Identities (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Marginalized Voices and Identities is an optional enrichment level in the Social Science Program. This course explores the complex phenomenon of social inequalities as they pertain to gender, social class, ethnicity, and more. Students learn about the dynamics of power, privilege, and marginalization in contemporary societies. The concept of social identity is explored in relation to people’s position in society’s structure of power (political, economic, and symbolic). The intersections of various inequalities lead the students to reflect on notions such as positionality, normativity, institutionalization, and social change, among others. 

387-E06-LE Social Issues: From Private Troubles to Collective Responses (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Social Issues: From Private Troubles to Collective Responses is a required enrichment level course in the Psychology and Society Profile and an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course aims to solidify students’ sociological outlook on a variety of contemporary social issues and debates. In light of some of sociology’s major contributions, students learn to analyze social issues critically, focusing on their social construction, the impacts of social inequalities, and the ways in which societies and institutions respond. Finally, through fieldwork, field trips, or immersion projects, students learn to apply some of sociology’s observation techniques in order to gain a more concrete understanding of social problems.  

Business Administration
401-100-LE Introduction to Business and Administration (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The course will provide students with a general understanding of all types of administrative duties and develop a broad vocabulary related to the field. Although the focus will be on businesses, the class will also address the distinctive needs of public, not-for-profit and other non-governmental organizations.  Attention will also be placed on the importance of clear, concise, and professional business report presentations, namely through the required term project.  

Students will be introduced to the overall internal operations of businesses, and they will come to appreciate that many, if not all, business functions (production, marketing, human resource, finance, and information technologies) are also a daily concern for not-for-profit organizations, even though the terminology may be different.   

401-E01-LE Principles of Financial Management (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Principles of Financial Management is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will build on the knowledge and skills acquired in Introduction to Business and Administration through a more in-depth study of the principles and methods of financial management. Students will learn to apply the basic finance concepts employed by individuals and organizations to real-life situations. After successfully completing this course, students will be able to: understand the nature of financing operations and apply financial management theory to real business situations; analyze financial results through the computation of various financial ratios, understand the basic mechanisms of the stock market, and evaluate the most relevant financing methods for a given organization.   

401-E02-LE Law in the Business Environment (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Law in the Business Environment is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will build on the knowledge and skills they gained in Introduction to Business and Administration. This course is structured to provide the student with a basic understanding of the nature, function, contribution, and influence of law in the context of the business environment, and the opportunity to develop legal, ethical, and analytical skills. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to: (1) demonstrate an understanding of the key legal terms, concepts, and theories used in the current business environment; (2) apply them to identify situations that have legal implications for business; and (3) demonstrate critical thinking skills by the use of appropriate strategies to analyze legal problems and evaluate solutions.  

401-E03-LE Marketing: Speaking to People’s Needs (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Marketing: Speaking to People’s Needs is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will enter a more in-depth study of the principles and methods of marketing. Students will learn how to apply the basic marketing concepts employed by individuals and organizations to real-life situations. After successfully completing this course, students will be able to: understand the nature of marketing and apply marketing theory to real business situations; analyze how marketing decisions are made in the current business environment; describe how consumer behaviour is affected by various factors; relate product strategy to the other variables of the marketing mix and analyze marketing cases.  

401-E04-LE The Business of Sport (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Business of Sport is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. People identify with "their people", their tribe. Tribes need heroes, and today's heroes are our sports figures. As such these figures and their activities undergo immense scrutiny and draw huge fan bases. People will spend their money and devote huge amounts of time to these groups, making them highly valuable businesses. This class will examine the business models that are viable in a sports environment and how they can be profitable, their contribution to society, and their ethical implications of them. 

401-E05-LE Next Level Business (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Next Level Business is a required enrichment level course for students of the Commerce Profile and is an optional enrichment course for other students. This class will take the principals learned in Introduction to Business and Administration in order to take the understanding of students to the next level. Students will revisit the concepts of administration and organizational activities to see real-world applications of theory and analyse the successes and failures of various organizations. From the NGO to the fortune 500, from municipalities to ministries, humans endeavour to administer organizations and corporations to succeed in advancing human society using: Marketing, Operations Management, Human Resources, Finance, and I.T. we will see how various structures are administered and deliver value to clients, key partners and do so in a financially viable fashion that ultimately advances human society.   

401-E06-LE Management: Human Resources and Financial Tools (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Management: Human Resources and Financial Tools is an optional enrichment level course in the Social Science Program. In this course students will build on the skills and knowledge they gained in Introduction to Business and Administration. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the main methods and principles of the effective management of human, material, and capital resources. Students will apply the principles of management theory to typical situations in small and medium-sized businesses, as well as charitable, not-for-profit, and other organizations in society. Through a combination of theory and practical applications, they will learn how to analyze management as a process. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the main concepts and principles of management theory; to analyze the functions of management and its role in organizations and in society; and to apply appropriate management practices to real-world situations. 

University Pre-requisites
101-0U1-LE The Biology of Behaviour (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Social interactions, mental disorders, and our reactions to the external environment – these topics bring about the question of nature versus nurture. Understanding the role of biological systems can help us make sense of the complexity of human behavior. In this course, we will explore the role of the nervous and endocrine systems in the maintenance of internal physiological balance and the manifestation of behaviours. We will further investigate the topic of human behaviour by delving into the reproductive system and inheritance. 

201-0U1-LE Differential Calculus (3-2-3) 75 HRS / 2 2/3 CR

This course is an introduction to calculus. It is designed to enable students to understand the idea of limit and derivative of basic functions and to learn the principal concepts and methods of differential calculus. Students will also learn how to (1) formulate a functional model of certain business, economic, and other current human realities using the appropriate terminology and definitions, (2) solve problems based on functional models using differential calculus with rigorous mathematical reasoning, and (3) explain and interpret the results using appropriate language. Applications include problems involving rates of change, optimization, and demographics.

201-0U2-LE Integral Calculus (2-2-3) 60 HRS / 2 1/3 CR

In this course, students will build on the skills and knowledge they acquired in Differential Calculus. The aim is for students to understand the idea of the definite and indefinite integral and to learn the concepts and methods of integral calculus. Students will also learn how to (1) formulate a functional model of certain business, economic, and other current human realities using the appropriate terminology and definitions, (2) solve problems based on functional models using integral calculus with rigorous mathematical reasoning, and (3) explain and interpret the results using appropriate language. Applications include problems involving separable differential equations and bounded areas (Consumer’s Surplus, Producer’s surplus and equilibrium point, Lorenz curve, and Gini coefficient).

201-0U3-LE Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry (2-2-3) 60 HRS / 2 1/3 CR

In this course, students will be introduced to linear algebra and vector geometry. Students will acquire basic skills in manipulating vectors and matrices and learn the principal methods for solving linear systems of equations (Gaussian Elimination, Inverse Method) and inequalities (simplex method). They will also learn how to (1) formulate a linear model of certain business, economic, and other current human realities using the appropriate terminology and definitions, (2) solve problems based on linear models with rigorous mathematical reasoning, and (3) explain and interpret the results using appropriate language. Applications include Leontief’s method, optimization problems, and Markov processes.  

360-0U1-LE Probability and Statistics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will build on the skills and knowledge they acquired in Quantitative Analysis to the interpretation of data, statistical inference, and decision-making in the context of the social sciences. Students will learn how to choose and perform the statistical procedure that is appropriate to current human reality. Students will also learn how to work with probability concepts. Some simple ideas about chance will be introduced in the context of whether chance can be ruled out as an explanation for a relationship observed in a sample or whether bias may also be present.

NOTE: SOME COURSE TITLES MAY DIFFER SLIGHTLY ON STUDENTS' TRANSCRIPTS; PLEASE REFER TO COURSE NUMBERS.

GRADUATE EXIT PROFILE

 

The Graduate Exit Profile constitutes the local interpretation of the general aims and goals of the Social Science Program. It is defined by sixteen attributes students graduating from the program are expected to possess. The Graduate Profile figures prominently in the formulation of the criteria according to which the Program evaluates students’ Comprehensive Assessment. The essential attributes of the Graduate Exit Profile are: 

 

Academic Knowledge  Scientific Research 
Goal: Integrate and apply skills and knowledge acquired in the Social Science Program to study human phenomena from a trans-disciplinary approach. 

 

  • Recognize, compare, and integrate different fields of knowledge in the social sciences. 
  • Differentiate between and apply various theoretical and methodological frameworks particular to the disciplines of the social sciences.  
  • Explain the main concepts, theories, laws, models, and schools of thought (past and present) in the disciplines of the social sciences.  
Goal: Use research skills to access information from multiple sources; use critical thinking skills to evaluate and synthesize information in the form of conclusions, ideas, and opinions. 

 

  • Use technology as a research tool in qualitative and quantitative data interpretation. 
  • Use scientific methods in the social sciences to examine human phenomena at different scales from multiple disciplines.  
  • Use identified critical thinking skills independently and reflectively to master the basic rules of rational thought, critical discourse, and coherent argumentation.  
  • Demonstrate technological and media literacy. Show an understanding of the role of academic and non-academic sources in understanding the world. 
Communication  Citizenship 
Goal: Express ideas clearly and creatively in diverse ways through speech, writing and technologies. 

 

  • Read and comprehend material in diverse social science disciplines in English and French. 
  • Convey ideas, information, and concepts responsibly and coherently in both oral and written English and French.  
  • Articulate and defend an academic argument orally and in writing. 
  • Develop appropriate use of technologies to communicate orally and in writing.  
  • Apply proper academic formatting and value academic integrity.  
Goal: Recognize one’s role in world community issues with respect for diverse cultures and differing perspectives.  

 

  • Engage in respectful and collaborative activities with peers exploring diverse world views.  
  • Compare and contrast different points of view and perspectives. 
  • Evaluate important contemporary issues with special emphasis on the Quebec context and on the realities and perspectives of the First Nations and Inuit. 
  • Use effective life skills to improve and maintain mental and physical well-being.  

 

THE COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

 

The Comprehensive Assessment will serve to evaluate each graduating student’s attainment of the goals outlined in the Graduate Exit Profile and will be completed within the 300-400-LE Integrative Course). Within the scope of the Integrative Course, students will carry out a major original project, such as an academic research project or equivalent major assignment. This project will integrate the perspectives of three social science disciplines and will involve publicly sharing the results. Students will also critically reflect on the effects of their social science training on their role as students and citizens. The research project and associated reflections will serve as the basis of their Comprehensive Assessment, the purpose of which is to ensure that students have integrated the knowledge and skills required of the Social Science Program. 

 

The following Learning Outcomes of the Social Science Exit Profile will be assessed by the Comprehensive Assessment: 

 

  • Differentiate between and apply various theoretical and methodological frameworks particular to the disciplines of the social sciences. 
  • Explain the main concepts, theories, laws, models, and schools of thought (past and present) in the disciplines of the social sciences. 
  • Use technology as a research tool in qualitative and quantitative data interpretation. 
  • Use scientific methods in the social sciences to examine human phenomena at different scales from multiple disciplines. 
  • Evaluate important contemporary issues with special emphasis on the Quebec context and on the realities and perspectives of the First Nations and Inuit. 
  • Use effective life skills to improve and maintain mental and physical well-being. 

Commerce Profile (300.A1)

Also known as Sciences humaines – Profil monde des affaires

💭 THIS PROGRAM IS FOR YOU IF…

  • You like to discuss, debate, and express your opinions 
  • You are interested in current events
  • You are interested in human realities and the challenges facing humanity
  • You want to think about solutions for the challenges facing humanity
  • You want to go to university
  • You like different perspectives and want to learn more about the disciplines of ancient civilizations, history, geography, economics, political science, psychology, and sociology
  • You would like to do a cross-cultural project

Program Description

 

The Social Science Program is an exciting pre-university program that provides students with a balanced education involving general and scientific learning in a variety of disciplines, thereby making it possible for them to understand and analyze human realities. This training will equip students with the necessary knowledge, regardless of profile, to pursue university studies in 100s of different programs (certain prerequisite courses may be required).  

 

Students may choose from one of five profiles: Criminology, Psychology and Society, Commerce, Global Studies, and Sports and Leisure.

 

The Psychology and Society, Commerce, Global Studies with Math, and Sports and Leisure with Math Profiles are all linked to specific university prerequisites and are intended to prepare students for those particular fields of study.

Profile Description

 

This profile enables students to explore their interests and engage with problems related to the world of administration. The profile is organized to offer appropriate social science perspectives, while also providing university prerequisites for university-level business programs. Required courses include Microeconomics and Next Level Business, along with Differential Calculus and Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry.  

 

Students have the option to take one introductory-level course in Ancient Civilizations, Political Science, Geography, or Sociology which will serve as a pre-requisite for the optional enrichment-level course in semester 4. 

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Overview

PREREQUISITES

Secondary 5 Technical and Scientific Mathematics Option
OR
Secondary 5 Science Mathematics Option
OR
Mathematics 526

 

OBJECTIVES

 

By the end of the Social Science program, students will be able to: 

  • Explain human realities by using the main facts, concepts, theories, models, and approaches specific to the social science disciplines; 
  • Examine various issues related to citizenship in today’s world; 
  • Use academic work tools and methods as well as the technology needed to successfully pursue their studies; 
  • Demonstrate scientific intellect and intellectual curiosity, and think critically; 
  • Experiment with social science research methods; 
  • Convey their ideas in a clear and organized manner in the language of instruction and use information resources in their second language in the context of their social science studies; 
  • Demonstrate that the subject-specific and methodological learning required to study human realities has been integrated. 

PROGRAM GRID WITH 2 MATH ➡️ Certificate Holders

Total courses: 29
Total credits: 57 1/3

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge  300-100-LE  
Differential Calculus    201-0U1-LE  
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics  383-010-LE  
Introduction to Business and Administration 401-100-LE
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
Introduction to College English   603-101-MQ
Complementary Course  203-NYA-05

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods  300-010-LE  
Introduction to History    330-010-LE 
Introduction to Psychology    350-010-LE  
Introduction option of choice*   
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application  345-101-MQ 
French – General   602-MQ
English for Social Science   603-BEK-LE

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis 360-010-LE
Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry  201-0U3-LE 
Microeconomics: Behaviours of Decision Takers  383-E01-LE 
Thematic Issue (choice) 300-E01-LE to 300-E07-LE 
Humanities – World Views    345-102-MQ
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ 
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ 

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE 
Next Level Business 401-E05-LE
Enrichment option of choice**
Humanities – Ethical Issues 345-BE
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ
French – Specific   602-BE 
Complementary Course   
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle  109-103-MQ

PROGRAM GRID WITH 2 MATH ➡️ Non-Certificate Holders

Total courses: 29
Total credits: 57 1/3

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge  300-100-LE  
Differential Calculus    201-0U1-LE  
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics  383-010-LE  
Introduction to Business and Administration 401-100-LE
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
Introduction to College English   603-101-MQ
Oeuvres narratives et écriture  602-UF0-MQ

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods  300-010-LE  
Introduction to History    330-010-LE 
Introduction to Psychology    350-010-LE  
Introduction option of choice*   
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application  345-101-MQ 
Poésie, théâtre et écriture 602-UF1-MQ
English for Social Science   603-BEK-LE

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis 360-010-LE
Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry  201-0U3-LE 
Microeconomics: Behaviours of Decision Takers  383-E01-LE 
Thematic Issue (choice) 300-E01-LE to 300-E07-LE 
Humanities – World Views    345-102-MQ
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ 
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ 

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE 
Next Level Business 401-E05-LE
Enrichment option of choice**
Humanities – Ethical Issues 345-BE
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ
Comparaison d’oeuvres littéraires 602-UF2-MQ
Complementary Course   
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle  109-103-MQ

PROGRAM GRID WITH 3 MATH ➡️ Certificate Holders

Total courses: 28
Total credits: 57 2/3

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge  300-100-LE  
Differential Calculus    201-0U1-LE  
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics  383-010-LE  
Introduction to Business and Administration 401-100-LE
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
Introduction to College English   603-101-MQ
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application 345-101-MQ 

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods  300-010-LE  
Integral Calculus 201-0U2-LE
Introduction to History    330-010-LE 
Introduction to Psychology    350-010-LE  
Introduction option of choice*  
French – General   602-MQ
English for Social Science   603-BEK-LE

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis 360-010-LE
Microeconomics: Behaviours of Decision Takers  383-E01-LE 
Thematic Issue (choice) 300-E01-LE to 300-E07-LE 
French – Specific 602-BE
Humanities – World Views    345-102-MQ
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ 
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ 
Complementary Course   

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE 
Next Level Business 401-E05-LE
Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry 201-0U3-LE
Humanities – Ethical Issues 345-BE
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ
Complementary Course 
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle   109-103-MQ

PROGRAM GRID WITH 3 MATH ➡️ Non-Certificate Holders

Total courses: 28
Total credits: 57 2/3

Semester 1

Academic Skills and Knowledge  300-100-LE  
Differential Calculus    201-0U1-LE  
Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics  383-010-LE  
Introduction to Business and Administration 401-100-LE
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ
Introduction to College English   603-101-MQ
Humanities – Knowledge and its Application 345-101-MQ 

Semester 2

Qualitative Methods  300-010-LE  
Integral Calculus 201-0U2-LE
Introduction to History    330-010-LE 
Introduction to Psychology    350-010-LE  
Introduction option of choice*  
Oeuvres narratives et écriture 602-UF0-MQ
English for Social Science   603-BEK-LE

Semester 3

Quantitative Analysis 360-010-LE
Microeconomics: Behaviours of Decision Takers  383-E01-LE 
Thematic Issue (choice) 300-E01-LE to 300-E07-LE 
Poésie, théâtre et écriture 602-UF1-MQ
Humanities – World Views    345-102-MQ
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ 
Physical Education 101 or 102   109-101-MQ or 
109-102-MQ 
Complementary Course   

Semester 4

Integrative Course  300-400-LE 
Next Level Business 401-E05-LE
Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry 201-0U3-LE
Humanities – Ethical Issues 345-BE
Literary Genres or Literary Themes    603-102-MQ or  
603-103-MQ
Comparaison d’oeuvres littéraires   602-UF2-MQ
Physical Activity and a Healthy Lifestyle   109-103-MQ

*In the first year, students in the Commerce Profile select ONE Social Science introduction level option from Geography, Sociology, Ancient Civilizations, and Political Science.

 

**In the second year, students select ONE enrichment level Social Science course from disciplines opened in the first year with a maximum of two second-level courses from any one discipline.

COURSES

Methodology and Integration Courses
300-100-LE Academic Skills and Knowledge (2-1-2) 45 HRS / 1 1/2 CR

This course is designed to teach students the fundamental academic skills of researching, reading, and writing in the social sciences. Students are taught how to search for, comprehend and synthesize academic sources in the context of social science research. Throughout this process, they will recognize the various disciplinary perspectives that compose the social sciences and their respective perspectives on a diversity of topics. As they progress through the course, students will gain skills related to searching academic databases, critical evaluation of information, teamwork, academic writing, and oral communication. 

300-010-LE Qualitative Methods (2-2-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to teach students how to distinguish between scientific and non-scientific knowledge, to learn about basic ethics in social science research, to work in teams, to apply a scientific approach to knowledge in the social sciences, and to understand the limits of social science research. They will be introduced to a variety of qualitative approaches used in the social sciences. Using qualitative tools, they will collect, analyze, and interpret data. Students will put into practice qualitative approaches to social science research and will produce a research report that documents their methods and results.  

360-010-LE Quantitative Analysis (2-2-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to teach students to use statistical tools to process and describe data related to the field of social sciences. Students are taught a number of statistical and data collection techniques to understand the possibilities and limitations of quantitative analysis. Learning these statistical techniques will help students to describe and interpret human realities. 

300-400-LE Integrative Course (1-3-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to demonstrate an integration of what students have learned in the social sciences. Within the scope of the course, students will carry out a major original project, such as an academic research paper or equivalent major assignment. This project will integrate the perspectives of three social science disciplines and will involve sharing results with others. Students will also critically reflect on the effects of their social science training on their role as student and citizen. 

Thematic Issue Courses
300-E01-LE The Environment (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores issues in the environment demonstrating both the topical importance of the environment, as well as the interconnectedness of disciplines across the social sciences. This course is designed to equip students with a critical perspective on the roles of individuals and communities in shaping the environment, leading to an appreciation of the way they perceive the world and their place in it. 

300-E02-LE Indigenous Realities (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores the realities of Indigenous peoples in North America and around the world through a variety of academic perspectives. Each discipline may offer a perspective in tandem with one or more other disciplines, demonstrating their interconnectedness across the social sciences. This course will investigate the lived experiences of Indigenous peoples, as well as the impacts of colonialism in its myriad forms. 

300-E03-LE Media and Technology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Using a variety of academic perspectives, this course explores issues related to media in society as well as the broader topic of technology. Students will analyze the role and power of technologies and media in society, building on multiple disciplines in the social sciences. This course is designed to equip students with media literacy skills and a critical perspective on science and communication, leading to a reflection on their own position as citizens, consumers, and producers of culture. 

300-E04-LE Globalization (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course explores issues of Globalization though a variety of academic perspectives in the social sciences. The consequences of an increasingly interconnected world on society and the environment are less and less in dispute. Each discipline can offer a perspective in tandem with one or more disciplines to analyze the different aspects of globalization. 

300-E05-LE Justice and Injustice (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course explores issues of Justice through a variety of academic perspectives in the social sciences. This course strives to go beyond personal understandings of justice and injustice to develop the student’s critical view of the theme. This will be achieved through the examination of relevant concepts and facts as they are defined and contextualized within selected social science disciplines pertinent to this course.  Using a variety of approaches and theories, students will apply a multidisciplinary approach in order to question, analyze and critically evaluate the different factors that contribute to the understanding of issues of Justice and Injustice. 

300-E06-LE Identity and Culture (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores issues dealing with identity and culture through a variety of academic perspectives. Each discipline can offer a perspective in tandem with at least one or more other disciplines to analyze diverse identities and cultures and explore the concepts, approaches, and theories relevant to the theme. 

300-E07-LE Money Matters (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This is a multi-disciplinary course in the social sciences that explores the idea of money as a medium of exchange, a store of value, and a source of information amongst others. Each discipline can offer a different perspective contributing to the analysis of issues pertaining to money thereby demonstrating the interconnectedness of the social sciences. 

Geography
320-010-LE Introduction to Geography (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Geography is, in the broadest sense, an education for life and for living. Learning through geography helps us all to be more socially and environmentally sensitive, informed, and responsible citizens. Geography is an all-encompassing discipline that seeks to understand the world —its human and physical phenomena —through an understanding of place and location. Geographers seek to understand where things are found, why they are present in those places and how they diffuse through space. Also, Geography studies why places and the people who live in them develop and change in particular ways. In this course students will develop their geographic perspective to be able to understand the world around them, to interpret occurrences in geographic space and to recognise viable solutions.  

320-E01-LE Globe-Trotter: The Geography of Travel and Tourism (2-1-3) 90 HRS /2 CR

The study of Geography, by its very nature, covers a wide range of contemporary issues. Travel and tourism have enabled people to access the remote, for better and for worse. This course will build on knowledge obtained in Introduction to Geography to analyze how the environment both influences, and is influenced by, economic, political, and cultural aspects of travel and tourism.  

320-E02-LE Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Cultural Landscapes of Sports and Leisure is a required enrichment level course in the Sports and Leisure Profile and is an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course will be dedicated to the observation of human phenomena through the lens of geography-specific to the theme of sports and leisure. Given the nature of the competency (0PRA) students will learn to examine and analyze cultural landscapes in an applied context.   

320-E03-LE What on Earth (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

What on Earth is a required enrichment level course in the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment level course to other students. This course will be dedicated to the study of human realities through the lens of geography. It will take a regional approach and examine how human societies and physical environments are deeply connected and constantly changing. Given the nature of the competency (0PRA), students will observe and analyze the diversity of human and natural realities in an applied context.  

320-E04-LE The Global Casino: An Approach to Environmental Issues (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Money and economics underlie environmental issues and environmental issues involve winners and losers. Building on their skills obtained in Introduction to Geography students will apply their theoretical knowledge of the principles of human and physical geography to an analysis of the problems caused by human interaction with natural systems and the hopes for solutions.  

History
330-010-LE Introduction to History (3-1-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

Introduction to History allows students to develop historical knowledge by focusing on the fundamental events and actors of world history with a particular emphasis on the 15th century until today. It introduces students to the study of history as a social science. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to apply the basic concepts used in the study of history, understand the importance of historical documents, analyze at least one global phenomenon from a historical perspective and identify various viewpoints as they relate to a specific historical event. 

330-E01-LE The Contemporary World (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Contemporary World is a required enrichment level course for students of the Global Studies Profile (no math option) and an optional enrichment course for other students. It builds upon the concepts and events examined in Introduction to History. It will examine the historical context of contemporary issues with a particular emphasis on significant global events.  

330-E02-LE History of the United States (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of the United States is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. It serves as an overview of the developments and forces which have determined the course of the United States. Students will build on the knowledge and skills they gained in Introduction to History to do an analysis of America’s rise from its colonial beginnings to becoming a superpower. The students will explore the American dimension of such issues as democracy, racism, revolution, and capitalism.

330-E03-LE History of Canada (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of Canada is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. Students will examine themes in Canadian history from pre-contact Indigenous societies to the present. They will examine emerging scholarship that situates Canada in a world-historical context, as befits a country with a long history of immigration, with an emphasis on the complex dynamics affecting the interactions of multiple cultures (Indigenous, European, and later African, Asian, and other).   

330-E04-LE The Middle Ages in Europe (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Middle Ages in Europe is an optional enrichment level course in the Social Science Program. The course examines major historical developments in the Western world from Late Antiquity to the period of early attempts at global imperial expansion and settlement in 1500. Students will explore several concepts and events that echo those found in contemporary history (e.g., secularism and religion, the nation-state, and pandemic outbreaks).  

330-E05-LE History of Sports (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

History of Sports is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. It examines the development of sports from the Middle Ages to the present. It will focus on important events that influence the development of sports. Students will become aware of how issues of race, class, gender, and politics played an important role in how sports developed over time.   

330-E06-LE Society and Environment in History (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Society and Environment in History is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. The course examines the environmental impacts of human society from the origins of agriculture to the contemporary period. It explores historical debates over the causes of ecological disasters, societal collapses, as well as environmental successes. Themes can be explored from local, regional, national, and global perspectives. 

330-E07-LE Indigeneity and Settler-Colonialism (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Indigeneity and Settler-Colonialism is a second-level non-compulsory course in the Social Science Program. The course explores multiple instances of settler-colonialism selected from the late fifteenth century to the contemporary era. Students will examine its effects on Indigenous peoples, with an emphasis on the Indigenous perspectives of those encounters. North America and at least one other region (e.g., South America, Oceania, Polynesia, or elsewhere) will be examined. 

330-E08-LE Archives on Trial (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Archives on Trial is a required enrichment level course for students of the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. It examines legal culture, both formal and informal, through historical archives. It will examine the historical context of criminological issues through the lens of primary source material, with a particular emphasis on case studies.  

330-E09-LE Film as History (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Film as History is a second-level non-compulsory course in the Social Science Program. The course provides cinematic portrayals of history and examines them as historical arguments, given that visual literacy skills have become as essential as traditional literacy skills in understanding historical knowledge and perspectives. The course would examine a central theme (e.g., empire, gender, social classes, Cold War cinema, historical mythologies) with attention to films as an influence on historical perspectives and as cultural artifacts. 

Ancient Civilizations
332-010-LE Introduction to Ancient Civilizations (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course focuses on two major fields of study: archaeology and history. In this class, students will first learn the methods used by archaeologists and historians to reconstruct the past. These methods will then be used to explore three major developments in our human past: 1. The appearance of Homo sapiens roughly 200,000 years ago; 2. The Neolithic Revolution roughly 10,000 years ago and the origins of agriculture; 3. The rise of civilizations in Mesopotamia (c.c. 4000 BCE), Egypt (c.c. 3200 BCE), and Greece (c.c. 1500 BCE). Within each of these broad subject areas, case studies will be used to demonstrate how archaeologists and historians reconstruct the past. Students will also use these methods to research a case study independently from any ancient culture of their choice. 

332-E01-LE Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Sport, Entertainment, and Leisure in the Ancient World is a required enrichment level course for students of the Sports and Leisure Profile and is an optional enrichment course for other students. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of select aspects of sport, entertainment, and/or leisure in the ancient world. Employing different types of ancient evidence, this course will focus on exploring and analysing social, cultural, political, economic, military, and/or religious aspects of sport, entertainment, and/or leisure in select societies and cultures of the ancient world. Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of ancient sport, entertainment, and/or leisure on the modern world.  

332-E02-LE In Search of the Greeks (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In Search of the Greeks is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of ancient Greek civilization. This course will explore the development of ancient Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Employing different types of ancient evidence, participants in the present course will explore and analyse the major religious, cultural, social, economic, military, and/or political elements of ancient Greek civilization. Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of the ancient Greek civilization on the modern world.    

332-E03-LE In Search of the Romans (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In Search of the Romans is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge they learned in their introductory Ancient Civilizations course and apply them to a more intensive study of ancient Roman civilization. Employing different types of ancient evidence, participants in the present course will examine and analyse the major religious, cultural, social, economic, military, and/or political factors which enabled Rome to expand from a small town into a vast empire governing diverse peoples, spanning the period from the foundation of the city of Rome (753 BCE) to the Crisis of the Third Century (235-284 CE). Throughout the course, students will become aware of the influence of the ancient Roman civilization on the modern world. 

Psychology
350-010-LE Introduction to Psychology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is an introduction to the discipline of psychology and highlights the contributions it has made to the understanding of human beings. As such, it will introduce students to the main perspectives, schools of thought, and the principal methodological approaches to the study of human behaviour and mental processes.  It is a required course in all social science profiles and serves as a prerequisite for all enrichment level Psychology courses. 

350-E01-LE Psychology of Mental Health (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Psychology of Mental Health is a required enrichment level psychology course for students of the Psychology and Society Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. While analyzing mental health from a holistic body/mind perspective, students will learn to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy behaviours and recognize the forces that undermine physical and mental health. Students will also learn about psychological disorders and the therapies that help those in need.  

350-E02-LE Psychology and Crime (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology and Crime is a required enrichment-level psychology course for students of the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students. The course is designed to provide a broad overview of the psychological study of crime and criminal behaviour. A number of topics related to the various aspects of crime and the judicial process will be investigated.  

350-E03-LE Psychology of Sport, Exercise, and Leisure (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Psychology of Sport, Exercise, and Leisure is a required enrichment level course for students of the Sports and Leisure Profile and an optional enrichment course for other students This course will present an introduction to the psychology of sport, exercise, and leisure. Students will learn about concepts, theories, and models pertaining to sport and exercise behaviour. It will examine psychological interventions to improve sport performance and exercise adherence and address a variety of sport, leisure, and exercise psychology topics.  

350-E04-LE Psychology of Human Sexuality (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Human Sexuality is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will analyze the biological, psychological, and sociocultural key dimensions of human sexuality while exploring its emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physical nature. The course will also examine myths, taboos, and misguided beliefs about this central aspect of human identity.  

350-E05-LE Human Relations and Communication (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Human Relations and Communication is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will learn about the factors which foster or inhibit successful personal interactions and communication. Students will have the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge in various experiential exercises.  

350-E06-LE Cognitive Psychology (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Cognitive Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will be introduced to cognitive processes, such as attention, memory, language, decision-making, and thinking. Students will gain insight into the fundamental role of cognition in the human realities studied.

350-E07-LE Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Industrial and Organizational Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. This course will present an introduction to the psychological study of human behaviour in organizations and the workplace. Topics will center around analyzing principles of individual, group, and organizational behaviour, and the application of this knowledge to issues at work.   

350-E08-LE Psychology of Music (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Music is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. This course will present an introduction to the psychological study of music. It will address the questions of what music is, how we perceive it, and how it impacts us as human beings. 

350-E09-LE Social Psychology (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Social Psychology is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will develop a basic understanding of the history, methods, and principal concepts of social psychology. The students will gain insights into how behaviour is influenced by social variables and processes.  

350-E10-LE Psychology of Development (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology of Development is an optional enrichment course in the Social Science Program. Students will analyze human development throughout the lifespan - from the womb to the tomb. Students will learn how the basic concepts, principles and theories that describe the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial changes that occur are woven together.

Economics
383-010-LE Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will be introduced to the main economic questions that a society must answer and to the main techniques that societies use to answer these questions. Students will learn the principal economic goals of society, why they are important, and how performance in achieving these goals is measured. This course also familiarises students with the basic model of how the macroeconomy functions; this model will be presented in a general form and then in more detail with extensive use of graphs.  Students will also learn the ways in which a market economy is vulnerable to failure in achieving its main macroeconomic goals, and some of the government policy tools that can be used to rectify problems in the economy, such as monetary or fiscal policies.  

383-E01-LE Microeconomics: Behaviors of Decision Takers (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Microeconomics: Behaviours of Decision Takers is a required enrichment level course in the Commerce Profile. It provides students with an opportunity to expand their knowledge in the Economics discipline and build on the knowledge and skills gained in Introduction to Economics, focusing more on the role consumers and firms play in the Economy. Students will analyze how individuals' behavior in decision-making can influence the allocation of resources and prices in markets, with the use of concepts such as Elasticity, Utility theory, Diminishing marginal utility, Opportunity costs, and Extensions of the Supply and Demand model.   

383-E02-LE Advanced Global Economics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Advanced Global Economics is a required enrichment level course for students of the Global Studies Profile (no math option) and an optional enrichment course for other students. Students will build on the skills and techniques learned in Introduction to Economics. Students will analyze the history of international trade and the evolution of the main ideas of trade theory. Students will learn how to explain the principle of comparative advantage and apply it to cases of voluntary exchange. Students will apply supply and demand diagrams and the concepts of producers’ surplus and consumers’ surplus to the analysis of the gains and losses from trade, as well as the gains and losses associated with different barriers to trade. 

383-E03-LE The Economics of Crime (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will provide an overview of core issues related to the economics of crime. Economic principles can explain every part of the criminal justice system and many of the motivations behind criminal acts. Laws create incentives for people to act in certain ways. Within an economic framework, the course will consider the ways in which social programs and other social conditions such as education, poverty, family structure, and even environmental factors affect crime.   

383-E04-LE Economic Issues (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Economic Issues is an enrichment course in the Social Science Program. In this course, students will learn how to apply economic theories to analyse issues related to the market, globalization, national debt, the environment, and business.      

Students will explore both sides of issues that pertain to the Canadian and international economic environment. This course will cover topics such as extensions of supply and demand curves, Producers and Consumers' Behaviors facing Uncertainties, Fiscal Policies, Budget Deficit and National Debt, Growth and Inequalities, Globalization, Environmental Economics, and Global warming.    

Political Science
385-010-LE Introduction to Political Science (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The purpose of Introduction to Political Science is to introduce students to the study of political science. Through the lens of this social science discipline, students are to become familiar with the pillars of political decision-making in their communities. Politics being an intrinsic element of life in society in the 21st century, this course equips students to appreciate the basic workings of political power struggles.   

To that effect, students will develop a political science vocabulary covering the basic terminology of power, authority, and legitimacy. They will also get acquainted with the major schools of thoughts and will develop an understanding for the dynamic of political institutions and be able to identify the great variety of political actors that exist.   

This study will be paired up with a critical vision of political events that ultimately demands from students to identify in current events who are the holders of power, describe how they yield that power, and what ends they serve.  

385-E01-LE Criminal Justice (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Criminal Justice is a required enrichment level course in the Criminology Profile and an optional enrichment level course for other students. This course will focus on the Canadian criminal justice system and its key components: the police, court, and correction institutions. In doing so, students will study the foundations of criminal law and of the Canadian constitution, the effects of the federal distribution of power on the system, and the importance of courts in a democratic regime. Comparison with elements of other countries’ criminal justice systems will be drawn out to assist students in their studies. The course will also explore contemporary issues and analyze classic court cases that form the backbone of the Canadian criminal justice system.  

385-E02-LE World Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

World Politics is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. The course will familiarize students with the central theories, concepts, and debates in the field of world politics, and highlight the key actors and events that influenced the development and relationships that characterize the world system today. The course will apply theories in the study of world politics to study a series of topics relevant to world politics. The course will give importance to discussions on current events that will help shed light on the global networks of power and the political dynamics between international state actors and transnational non-state actors that transcend political borders. Ultimately, the course encourages students to generate critical and informed views on the most pressing issues within the world system and enables them to identify political priorities for collective action based on their expanded knowledge and understanding of global politics. 

385-E03-LE Comparative Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Comparative Politics is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. In this course, students will analyze the fundamental concepts of state, government, regime, society, and the economy as well as the ideals of freedom and equality. These concepts will be examined with some historical background and explored with a comparative approach spanning over several countries. The analysis of contemporary issues like democratization, wealth inequality, religious fundamentalism, political culture, and political violence will be necessary to the understanding and critical assessment of these fundamental concepts. 

385-E04-LE Global Development (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Global Development is a required option for students of the Global Studies Profile and is an optional enrichment-level course for other students. In this course, students will explore the idea that societies and countries have different levels of political, economic, and human development on a global scale. Through the study of a variety of development issues, students will further their understanding of the unequal power relations between the West and the rest of the world, challenge the notion of a single development path, and acknowledge the diversity of cultural perspectives and priorities. 

385-E05-LE Identity Politics (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Identity Politics is an optional enrichment-level course in the Social Science Program. This course will explore the meaning and examine the role that identity plays in politics and political outcomes and draw on current relevant examples and issues at the national and global level to understand how and why identities are so central in motivating individuals’ political behavior and the state’s response to it. Students will analyze how different identity categories such as those based on race, class, religion, ethnicity, indigeneity, partisanship, national affiliation, sexual and gender identity, etc., influence the dynamics and organization of political systems, and the formation of public policy, political attitudes, values, and opinions. Through the study of contemporary issues, students will evaluate how identities are experienced politically in particular contexts and how they come to shape the way individuals choose to participate in politics, how they mobilize to challenge or safeguard dominant ideas about Justice, and how states engage, or not, with the political claims of both privileged and oppressed identity groups. 

385-E06-LE War, Conflict