300.31 Mathematics profile

Overview

PREREQUISITES

Mathematics profile: Math 526 or 564506 or 565506, TS or SN Level 5.

THE PROGRAM

The Social Science Program is intended to enable students to pursue university studies in the broad areas of social science, law, education, administration and commerce, through the acquisition of scientific learning based on the integration of knowledge and methods acquired in various social science disciplines. Students are permitted to take a maximum of two advanced courses from any one discipline.

PROGRAM PROFILES

Students may choose from one of five profiles. Psychology, mathematics and commerce are linked to specific university prerequisites and are intended to prepare students for those particular fields of study.

OBJECTIVES

The general objectives of the program are to enable students to:

  • identify the main subject-specific and cross-curricular facts, notions and concepts related to the human phenomenon;
  • explain theories, laws, models and schools of thought in relation to their proponents and the realities involved;
  • situate various issues related to citizenship in a context of globalization;
  • demonstrate the qualities associated with a scientific mind and critical thinking, as well as the skills required to apply the qualitative and quantitative methods used in the field of social science;
  • use the work and research methods required to pursue their studies;
  • use appropriate information processing technologies;
  • convey their ideas clearly and correctly in English;
  • read and understand basic social science documents written in French;
  • integrate the learning acquired throughout the program.

THE COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

The Comprehensive Assessment is a requirement that demonstrates students’ abilities to meet the program’s objectives. It includes two activities done in the Integrative Course: a research proposal and a final paper. In the 2,000 word paper, students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of the Social Science concepts and theories involved in their research and show how the disciplines are interconnected.

PROGRAM GRID

Total courses : 29
Total credits : 56 2/3

Semester 1

Physical Education 101 or 102 109-10?-MQ
Humanities – Knowledge 345-101-MQ
College English 603-101-MQ
Quantitative Methods 360-300-RE
Macroeconomics 383-920-LE
*Two introductory level Social Science courses

Semester 2

Physical Education 101 or 102 109-10?-MQ
Humanities – World Views 345-102-MQ
English for Social Science 603-BEK-LE
Complementary recommended:
Computers for Commerce
420-BFM-LE
Differential Calculus 201-103-LE
Western Civilization 330-910-LE
Introduction to Psychology 350-102-RE

Semester 3

Physical Education 109-103-MQ
English 102 or 103 603-10?-MQ
French – General 602-10?-MQ
Integral Calculus 201-203-LE
Social Science Methodology 300-300-RE
**Two advanced level Social Science courses

Semester 4

Humanities – Ethics 345-BEK-LE
English 102 or 103 603-10?-MQ
French – Specific 602-BE?-LE
Complementary Course
Linear Algebra 201-105-LE
Integrative course 300-301-RE
**One advanced level Social Science course

*In the first year students in the Mathematics Profile select TWO introductory level Social Science courses from:
– Introduction to Geography
– In Search of Lost Civilizations
– Political Life
– Introduction to Sociology
– Fundamentals of Business

**In the second year students select THREE advanced level Social Science courses from disciplines opened in your first year, with a maximum of two advanced courses from any one discipline.

COURSES

Ancient Civilizations
332-101-LE IN SEARCH OF ANCIENT EGYPT (IN SEARCH OF LOST CIVILIZATIONS) (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is an introduction to the study of the ancient world before the Classical civilizations of Greece and Rome with the focus being on the civilization of ancient Egypt. The study of ancient Egypt will not only introduce the students to the methodologies used to reconstruct the past but also help deepen their knowledge about ancient Egyptian history, religion and society. As perhaps the world’s best known and most popular ancient civilization, the study of ancient Egypt affords the students the chance to familiarise themselves with this fascination people from a number of Social Science perspectives such as history, archaeology, politics, economics and geography.

332-251-LE IN SEARCH OF THE GREEKS (THE GREEK AND ROMAN WORLD) (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will examine the major religious, cultural, social, and political elements of ancient Greek civilization, as well as the modern legacy of ancient Greek culture. Students will begin by analyzing the changes involved in the evolution of the Greek world from Minoan Crete to the development of the city-state in the period before the Persian Wars. This is followed by a more in-depth study of the civilization and politics of the Classical period, which will allow students to apply the principal theoretical approaches and models of the study of ancient history to an examination of the development and the nature of democracy in ancient Athens. Students will learn how to analyze and interpret archaeological finds and ancient texts within their cultural contexts. They will also learn the basics of how to handle the problems involved in working with archaeological finds and primary source texts, and how to use and evaluate the main concepts and approaches used in the study of ancient history.
(Prerequisite: 332-101-LE)

332-252-LE IN SEARCH OF THE ROMANS (THE ROMAN EMPIRE) (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Students will examine the cultural, social, political and military factors which enabled Rome to expand from a small town into a vast empire that endured well beyond the empire’s military collapse, as well as the aspects of Roman life and thought contributing to that collapse. Students will analyze the changes in the political and social environment of Rome in the evolution from the Monarchy to the Republic to the Empire. Students will analyze and interpret ancient texts and archaeological remains within their cultural contexts, and learn how to handle the problems involved in working with primary sources. Finally, students will learn how to distinguish between primary and secondary historical sources; how to interpret primary sources within their cultural contexts; and how to use and evaluate the main concepts and approaches in the study of ancient history.
(Prerequisite: 332-101-LE)

332-253-LE MYTHS AND ANCIENT SOCIETY (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will comprise an intensive analysis of the interplay between Greek myth and ancient Greek society. Students will analyze the physical, social and intellectual factors that contributed to and reflected the evolution of social and political institutions in early Greece. By applying the perspectives of different social science disciplines to a variety of Greek myths, students will be able to analyze how the Greeks used myths to explore certain fundamental problems of social organization and how these myths reflect the progressive development of social structures in the Greek world. Students will apply anthropological, political, religious, economic and psychological perspectives to these myths, and will compare what they learn from these myths to what archaeology reveals about the realities of ancient Greek life.
(Prerequisite: 332-101-LE)

Biology
101-901-LE HUMAN BIOLOGY (FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE) (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will acquaint themselves with various concepts related to Human Biology: the various components of the cells, the composition and functions of the human nervous system, the concepts and processes that regulate homeostasis, the various laws governing heredity and concepts of human reproduction. Historical background about different scientific discoveries will also be given. Finally, students will acquire the proper biological terminology to describe and understand each of these concepts.
NOTE: This course is required for students in the Psychology profile.

Business
401-101-LE FUNDAMENTALS OF BUSINESS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students are introduced to an overall integrated picture of Canadian business and its operations. Students will learn the fundamentals of business in its contemporary environment and the organizational, national and international trends that affect businesses both large and small. The major topics to be covered include: historical and contemporary foundations of business and economic systems, external environments, business ethics and social responsibility, forms of business ownership, management functions (planning, controlling, organizing and directing), and business activities (marketing, human resources, production, and financial and risk management). Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of current business terms, concepts, principles and practices, and their development; explain why and how businesses are formed; explain the roles of and relationships between business stakeholders; describe the various interrelated management functions and business activities, and explain how they contribute to the achievement of organizational and individual goals; describe and apply the steps in the decision-making/problemsolving process; and relate the understanding of business to other social science disciplines.

401-241-LE PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will build on the skills and knowledge they gained in Fundamentals of Business. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the main methods and principles of the effective management of human, material and capital resources. Students will learn the concepts, theories and methods of management, including planning, organizing, controlling and leading. Students will apply the principles of management theory to typical situations in small and medium-sized businesses, as well as charitable, not-forprofit and other organizations in society. Through a combination of theory and practical applications, they will learn how to analyze management as a process. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the main concepts and principles of management theory; to analyze the functions of management and its role in organizations and in society; and to apply appropriate management practices to real-world situations.
(Prerequisite: 401-101-LE)

401-242-LE PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will build on the knowledge and skills acquired in Fundamentals of Business through a more in-depth study of the principles and methods of financial management. Students will learn to apply the basic finance concepts employed by individuals and organizations to real-life situations. The major topics to be covered include: principles of accounting practices, financial planning and pro-forma financial statements, analysis and interpretation of financial statements, the time value of money as affected by interest rates and inflation, choosing an appropriate source of financing (equity or debt). After successfully completing this course, students will be able to: understand the nature of financing operations and apply finance management theory to real business situations; analyze financial results through the computation of various financial ratios, understand the basic mechanisms of the stock market, and evaluate the most relevant financing methods for a given organization
(Prerequisite: 401-101-LE)

401-243-LE BUSINESS IN THE INFORMATION ERA (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

(3-0-3) 45 hrs / 2 cr. In this course students will apply the skills and knowledge acquired in Fundamentals of Business to a study of how business keeps pace with the fast-changing environment of information technology. Students will apply their theoretical knowledge of business principles and methods to real-life situations in case simulations of computer-based business conduct (such as business management, E-commerce, E-business). Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to analyze the ways in which information technology can be used in various business functions and at different management levels in a global environment.
(Prerequisite: 401-101-LE)

401-244-LE ACCOUNTING FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Students will learn how to apply the basic principles of accounting to practical situations, and will learn how to analyze the issues involved conceptually, in addition to developing the technical ability to record, summarize, report and interpret financial data. The major topics to be covered include: the functions of accounting in the business environment; recording business transactions; the adjusting process; completing the accounting cycle and end-of-period accounting; accounting for a merchandising concern; accounting information systems; and ethical issues in accounting. After successfully completing this course, students will be able to: apply the principles and methods of accounting to the recording of business transactions; complete an accounting cycle and prepare such financial statements as the income statement and the balance sheet; operate computerized and manual accounting systems; and analyze business statements and associated financial problems.
(Prerequisite: 401-101-LE)

401-245-LE LAW IN THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will build on the knowledge and skills they gained in Fundamentals of Business. This course is structured to provide the student with a basic understanding of the nature, function, contribution, and influence of law in the context of the business environment, and the opportunity to develop legal, ethical and analytical skills. Topics for study will include: sources and kinds of law, the legal profession, constitutional applications, judicial and political institutions, legal systems, the courts, the law of persons, property law, contract law, business liability, guaranties for payment, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy, consumer protection and employment and labour law. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to: (1) demonstrate an understanding of the key legal terms, concepts and theories used in the current business environment; (2) apply them to identify situations that have legal implications for business; and (3) demonstrate critical thinking skills by the use of appropriate strategies to analyze legal problems and evaluate solutions.
(Prerequisite: 401-101-LE)

401-246-LE INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will enter a more in-depth study of the principles and methods of marketing. Students will learn how to apply the basic marketing concepts employed by individuals and organizations to real-life situations. The major topics to be covered include: consumer behaviour; elements of the marketing mix (product, price, promotion, distribution); marketing strategy and planning; foundations of the marketing plan; marketing communications; and not-for-profit marketing. After successfully completing this course, students will be able to: understand the nature of marketing and apply marketing theory to real business situations; analyze how marketing decisions are made in the current business environment; describe how consumer behaviour is affected by various factors; relate product strategy to the other variables of the marketing mix and analyze marketing cases.
(Prerequisite: 401-101-LE)

Economics
383-920-LE MACROECONOMICS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will be introduced to the main economic questions that a society must answer, and the main techniques that societies use to answer these questions. Students will learn the principal economic goals of society, why they are important, and how performance in achieving these goals is measured. Students will learn the basic model of how the macroeconomy functions. Students will also learn the ways in which a market economy is vulnerable to a failure to achieve its main macroeconomic goals, and some of the government policy tools that can be used to rectify problems in the economy. Students will also learn where there are potential conflicts or trade-offs in the pursuit of different goals.

383-291-LE INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will build on the skills and techniques learned in Macroeconomics. Students will analyze the history of international trade and the evolution of the main ideas of trade theory. Students will learn how to explain the principle of comparative advantage and apply it to cases of voluntary exchange. Students will apply supply and demand diagrams and the concepts of producers’ surplus and consumers’ surplus to the analysis of the gains and losses from trade, as well as the gains and losses associated with different barriers to trade.
(Prerequisite: 383-920-LE)

383-292-LE ECONOMIC ISSUES (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Students will learn how to apply macro and microeconomic theories to analyse issues related to the market, globalization, national debt, the environment, and business. Students will explore both sides of issues that pertain to the Canadian and international economic environment. Students will also start to combine macroeconomic techniques, such as supply and demand curves, with microeconomic concepts they will learn, such as price controls. Students will have an opportunity to actively apply Mechanism Design Theory and Open Source Theory to design their mid-term evaluation.
(Prerequisite: 383-920-LE)

383-293-LE MICROECONOMICS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will build on the skills and techniques learned in “Macroeconomics.” Students will learn to analyze how the interaction of consumer and producer behaviour determines prices and output. Elasticity measures will be used to analyze how supply and demand change in response to changes in prices and income. Students will apply the supply and demand model to cases of market regulation and control in such areas as agriculture and housing. Students will analyze consumer behaviour using both utility theory and indifference analysis. They will apply marginal analysis to the production behaviour of firms under different competitive conditions. They will also learn how a game theory framework can be used to analyze decision making under conditions of uncertainty. Students will apply the supply and demand model to resource markets in order to explain differences in the prices of resources and in the distribution of income among households
(Prerequisite: 383-920-LE)

Geography
320-101-LE INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will be introduced to the major tools, techniques, and methodological approaches of Geography. Students will learn that Geography is more than maps and place names. Geography is dedicated to the study of the Earth’s surface, of where things are and the interrelation of these features as they affect humans. The course will take a thematic approach to the study of the increasingly complex relationships between people, places and the environment. Throughout the semester, students will study various types of geographic processes and systems, and come to recognize that what happens in places depends more and more on what happens between places. This is demonstrated in such topics as the impact of economic decisions on environmental systems, and the potential changes in political decisions and relationships between states as a result of changes in the climate.

320-264-LE REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Regionalisation is a delineation process used by geographers to better understand the complex realities of the human-environment relationship. Students will apply their knowledge of natural systems and human development learned in Introduction to Geography to a specific region or regions of the world. To understand the present state of a region, students will explore the physical processes that created the region’s landscape and how its landscape influenced human settlement and development.
(Prerequisite: 320-101-LE)

320-265-LE GEOGRAPHY OF TOURISM (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Changes in society - specifically technological advancement, increased holiday time and access to credit - have provided a significant population with the ability to become increasingly mobile. Travelling has enabled people to access the remote, for better and for worse. Students will use their understanding of physical and human geography obtained in Introduction to Geography to better understand tourism. The impacts of tourism can have devastating effects: Students will explore what it means to be an "ugly tourist", examine the impact of cultural baggage, and analyse the environmental impacts of a transient population. Yet tourism can also have beneficial effects: Students will evaluate job creation, regional economic growth and the opportunity to foster humanitarian work.
(Prerequisite: 320-101-LE)

320-266-LE ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will enable students to apply the theoretical components learned in Introduction to Geography to an analysis of the various approaches used to study the global environment. Students will apply their theoretical knowledge of the principles of human and physical geography to an analysis of the problems caused by human interaction with natural systems. The students will work on a term project that will require the application of an appropriate strategy to the study of an environmental issue. Particular attention will be paid to the effects of population growth and technological change on environmental relationships.
(Prerequisite: 320-101-LE)

History
330-910-LE - 330-BEA-03 INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN CIVILIZATION (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will provide students with an understanding of Western Civilization and of how their world has been shaped by historical events. Students will be introduced to the fundamental characteristics of Western Civilization, and will be able to trace the evolution of our civilization in both time and space. Topics to be covered include a discussion of the tools and methods of the historian, and the place of history in the social sciences. Students will be introduced to the major themes of Western Civilization, including democracy, totalitarianism, revolution, imperialism, culture and conflict. Upon completion of the course students will be able to explain the basic concepts used in the study of history, correctly interpret a historical document, explain at least one major event or key figure in relation to the development of Western Civilization, and articulate various viewpoints as they relate to a specific historical event.

330-254-LE THE MIDDLE AGES IN EUROPE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will apply the skills they acquired in Introduction to Western Civilization to an analysis of the rise of Western Europe from approximately 800 to the Age of Discovery. The major topics to be covered include: the triumph of the Catholic Church; the Feudal Era (knighthood, chivalry, the courtly romance, marriage, family, and social status); the evolution of the nation-state; the effects of plague and pestilence; the Renaissance (humanism, secularization, and the re-emergence of the individual); the Reformation; and the expansion into new worlds. In this course students will apply their knowledge of the principles and methods of historical work to the history of the medieval period in order to become more familiar with the methods employed by historians to study the past. This course will also enable students to make meaningful comparisons with the age in which they themselves live. Students will also become more adept at accessing both traditional and electronic sources of information, and with working with both primary and secondary historical sources.
(Prerequisite: 330-910-LE)

330-255-LE THE HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will apply the knowledge and the skills acquired in “Introduction to Western Civilization” to an analysis of America’s rise from its colonial beginnings to becoming the world’s only true superpower. Students will explore the American dimension to such issues as democracy, racism, revolution, capitalism, and imperialism. Students will analyze the factors explaining why America’s influence on the rest of the world has been so important and also so controversial. Students will also learn how to apply the methodologies of historians to practical problems in the study of American history. By applying their knowledge of historical methods to an analysis of maps and documents important to the study of American history, students will better understand how historians study the past and draw conclusions.
(Prerequisite: 330-910-LE)

330-256-LE 20TH CENTURY HISTORY: A HUNDRED YEARS OF CONFLICT (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will build on the skills and knowledge acquired in Introduction to Western Civilization and examine contemporary world history through an analysis of the various political, social, cultural and economic conflicts that characterized the 20th century. Although the course will have a global scope, students will analyze the various factors behind the dominant influence of Europe and North America on contemporary world events, as well as the effects of this dominance. At the conclusion of the course, students will apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to the production of a major term paper analyzing a particular modern conflict.
(Prerequisite: 330-910-LE)

330-257-LE THE HISTORY OF CANADA (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will apply the skills they acquired in Introduction to Western Civilization to an analysis of the history of Canada, beginning with the first contacts between native peoples and Europeans, and continuing through to the present day. The major topics to be covered include: Canada before the Europeans; New France; the Conquest: British North America; the War of 1812; Confederation; the First World War; the Great Depression; the Second World War; Post-Modern Canada. This course will enable students to apply their knowledge of Canadian history in order to explain the unfolding Canadian drama of French and English speakers coping with the demands of geography and climate to create a unique society including indigenous people and immigrants. Attention will be given to the principles and methods of historical work employed in the study of the history of Canada in order that students become more familiar with the methods employed by historians to study the past. This course will also enable students to make meaningful comparisons between aboriginal America and the age in which they themselves live. Students will also become more adept at accessing both traditional and electronic sources of information, and working with both primary and secondary historical sources.
(Prerequisite: 330-910-LE)

330-301-LE HISTORY OF CRIME AND PUNISHMENT (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will apply the skills they acquired in Introduction to Western Civilization to a study of the global history of crime and punishment from ancient to contemporary times. Attention will be drawn to various methods of dealing with criminal activity, retribution and rehabilitation. Students will explore the ingenious, and sometimes bizarre methods employed to create just and orderly societies. In this course, students will apply their knowledge of the principles and methods of historical work to the history of crime and punishment in order to become more familiar with the methods employed by historians to study the past. This course will also enable students to make meaningful comparisons between the perceptions of criminal behaviour and the various methods of retribution in both the past and the present. Students will also become more adept at accessing both traditional and electronic sources of information, and with working with both primary and secondary historical sources.
(Prerequisite: 330-910-LE)
NOTE: Criminology Profile only

Mathematics
201-015-50 SECONDARY V MATHEMATICS: TECHNICAL AND SCIENTIFIC OPTION (4-2-4) 90 HRS / 3 1/3 CR.*

Course content parallels that of secondary math 564506 and 565506. Students will learn to analyze and to solve problems using concepts in algebra and greometry. Topics include algebraic operations in conformity with rules, properties of functions and their graphs, equations and inequalities in one or two variables, exponential and logarithmic functions, geometric vectors and trigonometric functions. *Non-program credits
(Prerequisite: Math 436 or 564406 or 565406, TS or SN Level 4)

201-103-LE DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS (3-2-3) 75 HRS / 2 2⁄3 CR

This course is an introduction to calculus. It is designed to enable students to understand the idea of the derivative (the rate of change of a function) and to learn the principal concepts and methods of differential calculus. Students will also learn how to apply differential calculus to problem-solving in business, economics, and other social science fields.
(Prerequisite: Math 526 or 564506 or 565506, TS or SN Level 5)

201-203-LE INTEGRAL CALCULUS (3-2-3) 75 HRS / 2 2/3 CR

In this course students will build on the skills and knowledge they acquired in “Differential Calculus.” The aim is for students to understand the idea of the definite integral (total variation of a function) and to learn the concepts and methods of integral calculus. Students will learn how to apply integral calculus to problem-solving in business, economics, and other fields in the social sciences. Students will also learn how to (1) formulate a functional model of certain business, economic and other situations using the appropriate terminology and definitions, (2) solve problems based on functional models, and (3) explain and interpret the results using grammatically correct language.
(Prerequisite: 201-103-LE)

201-105-RE LINEAR ALGEBRA (3-2-3) 75 HRS / 2 2⁄3 CR

In this course students will be introduced to linear algebra and vector geometry. Students will acquire basic skills in manipulating vectors and matrices and learn the principal methods for solving linear systems of equations. They will also learn how to (1) formulate a linear model of certain business, economic and other situations using the appropriate terminology and definitions, (2) solve problems based on linear models, and (3) explain and interpret the results using grammatically correct language. Students will learn how linear functions are used in many social science disciplines to quantify relationships among variables. Students will also learn how to apply the concepts and methods of linear algebra to an understanding of the quantitative methods used in business, economics, and management theory.
(Prerequisite: Math 526 or 564506 or 565506 - TS or SN Level 5)

201-301-RE ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE METHODS (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will apply the skills and knowledge they acquired in “Quantitative Methods” to the interpretation of data, statistical inference, and decision-making in the context of the social sciences. Students will also learn how to work with probability concepts. Some simple ideas about chance will be introduced in the context of whether chance can be ruled out as an explanation for a relationship observed in a sample. Students will also learn how to choose and perform the statistical procedure that is appropriate to a given research situation.
(Prerequisite: 360-300-RE)

Methodology
360-300-RE QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (2-2-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

The course is designed to teach students how to apply statistical tools to the interpretation of data in the social sciences. Students learn a number of descriptive and inferential statistical techniques so that they can present, analyze and interpret data using various forms of measurement. This will enable students to understand the relationships between variables. Students also learn how to estimate the parameters of a given population based on the corresponding statistics obtained from a sample.

300-300-RE INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL SCIENCE METHODOLOGY (2-2-2) 60 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to teach students how to apply the scientific approach used in the social sciences to conduct empirical research. By the end of the course, students will be able to: explain the characteristics of the scientific method; identify a research problem; select a research method and technique that correspond to the problem identified; produce a data collection tool based on the research method and technique selected; collect data using the tool produced; analyze the collected data; interpret their findings; and present their results in a formal research report.
(Prerequisite: 360-300-RE)

300-301-RE INTEGRATIVE COURSE IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

For the end-of-program Integrative Course, students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in their Social Science studies. The course fosters creativity, autonomy and responsibility. It also promotes a general understanding of research in the Social Sciences. Under the guidance of the instructor the student will research a topic using three Social Sciences disciplines. Their research will be made up of three different parts. At the beginning of the semester, students will select a topic they are interested in. They will then research this, compile an annotated bibliography and write a literature review. Drawing on their research, the students will then produce an academic poster and present their findings to the college community. Finally, they will write a paper on their research. For this activity, students will use the methods studied in previous methodology courses.
(Prerequisites: 360-300-RE, 300-300-RE)

Political science
385-101-LE POLITICAL LIFE: AN INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The purpose of this level one course is to provide an introduction to the study of political science. Students will become familiar with the nature of politics and the various factors that influence the political process. Students will also examine various concepts and ideologies which underlie the study of politics. This course will use a comparative approach requiring students to critically examine various issues and examples and to use the approaches studied to advance their knowledge and understanding of the political process.

385-261-LE POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will build upon the skills and knowledge acquired in Political Life by applying the concept of political ideology to an analysis of political systems and their development. Students will learn how to analyze the process whereby political systems are built upon ideas concerning the nature and role of the state, the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the relative importance of individual and collective rights. Students will also analyze various approaches to the conduct of politics by examining the fundamental principles that guide and support them. Through a systematic investigation of key ideological developments and their implications, students will be able to apply the knowledge gained to new issues and circumstances. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to interpret political events and ideas though different ideological lenses and thereby appreciate the importance of ideas in political life and in social interactions in general.
(Prerequisite: 385-101-LE)

385-262-LE THE POLITICS OF CANADA AND QUEBEC (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will examine the art and science of politics in Canada, with an emphasis on the province of Quebec. It also examines the political and historical background of the Canadian system of government, the structure of government agencies, and the interaction between government and the society it serves. Also, this course examines the phenomenon of Quebec Nationalism, focusing on the major historical precedents influencing its present role within the Canadian federation today.
(Prerequisite: 385-101-LE)

385-263-LE INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The purpose of this second level course is for students to apply the skills and knowledge gained in Political Life to the study of international relations. Students will learn how to apply the main theories and systems of analysis to the study of international relations. They will explore political concepts arising from the Western tradition of political thought, the evolution of political regimes and institutions, civil society and the international global systems. Students will also learn how to apply their understanding of these political concepts toward a more comprehensive understanding of major conflicts and crises.
(Prerequisite: 385-101-LE)

385-264-LE INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course introduces students to comparative politics. Comparative politics is one of the four major sub-fields of political science that distinguishes itself by its comparative approach to the study of major themes in political science. It attempts to understand politics through the application of theories to cases from around the world. This course provides an overview of topics in comparative politics and is organized around questions that comparative politics scholars ask about the world. Given the vast array of such questions, this course will focus on some main themes which could include: state formation (imperialism, colonization/decolonization), political systems, political culture and ethnic conflict, levels of economic development throughout the world, political violence, crime and terrorism, socio-political movements and a variety of state policies on issues such as gender, religion, health, the environment, resources, trade, etc.
(Prerequisite: 385-101-LE)

385-401-LE CRIMINAL JUSTICE: LAW AND ORDER (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is designed to introduce students to selected issues and debates in the administration of justice and the creation of law, and will focus on the ideas of justice, liberty, equality, law and order, rights and privileges. Drawing primarily on political, but also on criminological, sociological and historical resources, students will be required to analyze the key stages in the criminal justice process, from how crime is defined in relation to law, to how it is dealt with by the police, the courts, and correctional institutions within the different jurisdictions be they municipal, provincial and/or federal. This course will take a critical approach to both the formal principles of justice as they apply to this system, as well as how they are woven into the process at various stages. While the focus of the course is on institutional responses to crime, emphasis will also be placed on debates concerning the discretion, accountability, and authority of various decision-makers in the criminal justice system. In addition, students will explore several alternative approaches to law and justice (e.g. aboriginal and religious approaches) and investigate how the values and principles upon which a society is built will influence the roles that Law plays and the forms that Law and dispute resolution take. Throughout the course, attention will be paid to the differences between theory and practices within the system, and to the links between criminal justice practices and broader social, political and economic processes that shape institutional possibilities. Students will also be encouraged to think critically about the policy implications and limitations of different approaches to crime and justice as applied to different case studies in transnational crime.
(Prerequisite: 385-101-LE)
NOTE: Criminology Profile only

Psychology
350-102-RE INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is an introduction to the discipline of psychology and highlights the contributions it has made to the understanding of human beings. As such, it will introduce students to the main perspectives, schools of thought and the principal methodological approaches to the study of human behaviour and mental processes. It will describe the biological, cognitive, and affective processes that underlie human behaviour and permit us, as humans, to adapt to our environment. At the end of the course a student should be able to interpret various (simple) patterns of human behaviour using the concepts and theories learned in the course.

350-271-LE SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Students will develop a basic understanding of the history, methods, and principal concepts of social psychology. They will also learn about social perception and cognition, how attitudes are formed and changed, how prejudice develops and is expressed as discrimination. In addition, the topics of social influence, pro-social behaviour and the effects of groups on individual performance will be studied. Students will analyze a social problem from the perspective of social psychology and apply this analysis toward solving the social problem. Finally, the students will gain insights into how their own behaviour is influenced by social variables and processes.
(Prerequisite: 350-102-RE)

350-272-LE THE PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN SEXUALITY (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will build on the knowledge and skills acquired in Introduction to Psychology. Students will develop a basic understanding of the history, methods, and principal concepts of the psychology of human sexuality. They will also learn about: (a) how the male and female anatomy affect human sexuality, (b) the male and female patterns of sexual arousal and response, (c) the role of love in the development of sexual relationships, and (d) the role of communication in sexual behaviour. In addition the course will deal with the topics of contraception and sexual victimization. Students will be expected to analyze a topic in sexuality and apply their knowledge towards a practical solution of the problem.
(Prerequisite: 350-102-RE)

350-273-LE THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will present an introduction to sport psychology and review the research methods used in the field. It will also deal with why people participate in sport and who participates in sport, the motivation of participation and what personality styles are linked to various sports. The course will also include such additional issues as arousal, anxiety, stress and aggression in sports, group cohesion, coaching, and psychological interventions to improve performance. Students in the course will be required to take a problem in sports, analyse it and construct a solution by applying the specific knowledge gained in the course.
(Prerequisite: 350-102-RE)

350-274-LE HUMAN RELATIONS AND COMMUNICATION (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will apply the knowledge and skills acquired in Introduction to Psychology to an analysis of the factors which foster or inhibit successful personal interactions and communication. The main topics to be covered include: communication theory, self-concept and self-esteem, perception and stereotyping, conflict resolution, emotions, trust, and the maintenance of healthy relationships. A thorough analysis of the theoretical aspects of the course will enable the students to apply this knowledge in the experiential exercises, journals, and discussions by using the appropriate communication strategies.
(Prerequisite: 350-102-RE)

350-275-LE PSYCHOLOGY OF MENTAL HEALTH (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

While analyzing mental health from a holistic body/mind perspective, students will learn to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy behaviour and recognize the forces that undermine physical and mental health. Various perspectives and personality theories are examined which students will apply to the assessment and diagnosis of behaviour. Students will also learn about psychological disorders and the therapies that help those in need.
(Prerequisite: 350-102-RE)

350-276-LE PSYCHOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Students will analyze human development throughout the life span - from the womb to the tomb! Students will learn how the basic concepts, principles and theories that describe the physical, cognitive and psychosocial changes that occur are woven together. The students will apply these concepts to the challenges at each stage of development. As well, students will learn the methods and ethics of developmental research and look briefly at the way an individual’s genetic make-up affects development.
(Prerequisite: 350-102-RE)

350-301-LE PSYCHOLOGY OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOUR (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will apply the skills they acquired in Introduction to Psychology to a study of the psychology of criminal behaviour. The course is to provide a broad overview the relationship between psychology and criminal behaviour. A variety of topics is to be discussed and critically evaluated, including offender profiling, eyewitness testimony, police interrogations, jury-decision making, treatment of offenders, psychopathy, risk assessment, criminal responsibility, and fitness to stand trial.
(Prerequisite: 350-102-RE)
NOTE: Criminology Profile only

Sociology
387-101-LE INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will introduce sociology as the science which seeks to explain group behaviour, the influences of groups on individuals, and the impact of social interaction and social structures. It will also introduce the basic concepts of the field of sociology and the individuals who contributed to its development as a social science. Students will learn the major sociological perspectives and how to apply them to various sociological topics such as social structure, culture, deviance, groups, sport. This course also introduces the scientific method and the research methods used most often by sociologists today. Through the application of sociological perspectives and concepts, the student will be able to demonstrate the relevance and scope of sociology, and to differentiate sociology from the other social sciences.

387-281-LE SOCIAL ISSUES & SOCIAL PROBLEMS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will build on the skills and knowledge developed in the Introduction to Sociology course. Students will be familiarized with the concept of ‘’social problem’’ and how it can be analyzed sociologically. They will be introduced to a critical analysis of the media and to contemporary debates about the “information society”, questioning the belief that information now circulates freely thanks to information and communication technologies, to the benefit of all. A number of social issues/problems which our society faces or will face in the coming years will then be presented. The theme of social inequality will be emphasized as we look at poverty, class warfare, globalization, immigration, racism, discrimination and criminality. Students will be exposed to various situations dealing with social inequality, social movements and initiatives will be presented, providing possible strategies to reduce or eliminate social problems.
(Prerequisite: 387-101-LE)

387-282-LE MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will apply the skills and knowledge developed in Introduction to Sociology to a crosscultural analysis of marriage and the family. Students will apply a sociological perspective to such topics as marriage, family structure, the evolution of dating, cohabitation, the sandwich generation, single-hood, childbearing patterns, the family life cycle, parenthood, family change. Students will also analyze such family issues or problems as divorce, teenage pregnancy, aging parents, family violence from a sociological perspective as well as present strategies to reduce or eliminate these problems.
(Prerequisite: 387-101-LE)

387-283-LE INSTITUTIONS AND INSTITUTIONAL ISSUES (System failure: the sociology of social institution) (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will apply the skills and knowledge they developed in Introduction to Sociology to such social institutions as education, sports, mass media, and health. Students will analyze the structure and links found between social institutions such as education and sport. Students will apply sociological concepts and a sociological perspective to analyze and explain issues related to these institutions. Students will also present their analysis of various strategies to reduce or eliminate problems. Students will understand the place and importance of social institutions within an information or post-industrial society.
(Prerequisite: 387-101-LE)

387-284-LE POPULAR CULTURE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will build on the skills and knowledge developed in Introduction to Sociology to an analysis of the content and social impact of various forms of popular culture, such as film, toys, music, and television. Socialization will be emphasized as students analyze such factors as racism, sexism, ageism, stereotyping, media violence, and role modeling in various media forms. Students will apply a sociological perspective to the analysis of popular culture as an agent of socialization. Students will analyze various social problems caused by popular culture and present various strategies to reduce the problems based on their sociological analysis.
(Prerequisite: 387-101-LE)

387-285-LE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will apply the skills and knowledge developed in Introduction to Sociology to an analysis of sport as a social phenomenon and apply such factors as culture, social organization, socialization, deviance, social class, majority-minority relations, sex roles, and collective behavior to its understanding. The analysis and application of a sociological perspective will show the student how sport is a reflection of the larger society and its social structure, as well as the social significance of sport and the contribution of sport to the individual and to society. Students will apply sociological concepts and methods to an analysis of a social issue or issues related to sport and on the basis of this analysis present strategies to reduce the sport-related problem.
(Prerequisite: 387-101-LE)

387-286-LE THE YOUTH EXPERIENCE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will build on the skills and knowledge developed in Introduction to Sociology to a sociological analysis of the changing situations that youth have faced from the early 1960s to the present. Students will examine such areas as the family, the workplace, the school, peer groups, suicide, social pressure, and youth gangs. Students will also analyze the social phenomenon of delinquency and how it relates to family, school, peer groups, the mass media, et al. Students will identify youth problems, apply a sociological perspective to analyze the problems, and present various strategies to reduce the youth-related problems.
(Prerequisite: 387-101-LE)

387-301-LE DEVIANCE AND DELINQUENCY (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course, students will build on the skills and knowledge developed in "Introduction to Sociology" to a sociological analysis of deviance and delinquency. This course will focus on bizarre, unexpected, or self-destructive acts committed by youth or young adults. Deviance takes many forms, ranging from interpersonal violence to self-destructive, sexual and property deviance. The social context and the factors related to deviance and delinquency, as well as their consequences, will be explored.
(Prerequisite: 387-101-LE)
NOTE: Criminology Profile only

NOTE: SOME COURSE TITLES MAY DIFFER SLIGHTLY ON STUDENTS' TRANSCRIPTS; PLEASE REFER TO COURSE NUMBERS.