Academics

Humanities


Students generally begin the Humanities program with a course in category 101, Knowledge, followed by a course in category 102, World Views. An attempt at both categories – with a pass in at least category 101 – is required before proceeding on to the “Block B” program-specific category. Students must complete one course from each category in order to receive a DEC.


COLLEGIAL OBJECTIVES

Central to all Humanities courses at Champlain is practice in and development of more refined reflection, critical thinking and communication. Through interdisciplinary study of questions and issues important to human beings, students in Humanities will develop insights obtainable only through an interdisciplinary approach and will come to appreciate the inter-relationships in all their learning experiences. Students in Humanities will learn to reflect on, understand and become more involved in various dimensions of human experience and thereby to examine and better understand their own assumptions and values.

CATEGORY 101: KNOWLEDGE

MINISTERIAL OBJECTIVES

To apply a logical analytical process to how knowledge is organized and used, specifically:

  1. to recognize the basic elements of a field of knowledge;
  2. to define the modes of organization and utilization of a field of knowledge;
  3. to situate a field of knowledge within its historical context;
  4. to organize the main components into coherent patterns;
  5. to produce a synthesis of the main components.

NOTE: NOT ALL COURSES WILL BE OFFERED EACH TERM.

345-101-MQ BEAUTY WILL SAVE THE WORLD (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

Dostoyevsky once wrote “Beauty will save the world”. Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, another great Russian novelist, said the statement was “a prophecy”. If we believe these men, and if we have any intention of “saving the world”, it is imperative that we study beauty. In this class we agree with Dostoyevsky and Solzhenitsyn and launch a thousand ships in search of beauty. We steer our gaze toward the world and search for beauty in our relationships with self and others, in the everyday, in the natural world and in the arts: cinema, music, theatre, literature, architecture, painting and sculpture. And finally, we wonder about beauty beyond being.

345-101-MQ BEING HUMAN: AN EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVE (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

Are human beings natural born killers destined for self-destruction? Is who we are and what we do predetermined by our genetic make-up or is how we were raised determine our future? One way to seek answers to these questions we all ask ourselves about what we do and why we do it, is to look back millions of years and trace the evolution of humans, which is, in essence, the study of how we got this way in the first place. By understanding where we came from as a species and how this species (Homo sapiens) has developed since our emergence over 150,000 years ago, we may hope to better understand just who we are and why we behave the way we do.

345-101-MQ SPORT, SPECTACLE AND ENTERTAINMENT IN CLASSICAL ANTIQUITY (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

The students in this course will focus on an interdisciplinary exploration of social, cultural, political and religious effects of entertainment in ancient Greece and Rome (from the 6th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D.). Together we will attempt to elucidate how the ancient Greeks and Romans conceived of entertainment; how different forms of entertainment in the ancient world were organised and functioned; and what role entertainment played in these ancient societies. We will also attempt to understand how entertainment served to create a sense of social and cultural unity, as well as how it served to delineate ethnic and national identities; how entertainment could be used as propaganda; and most importantly, why so many forms of entertainment in the ancient world were so intrinsically tied to religion and religious activities, and why this is no longer the case in our world today.

345-101-MQ THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ANARCHISM (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

The well-known anarchist Gustav Landauer said that “the State is not something that can be destroyed by a revolution, but it is a condition, a certain relationship between human beings, a mode of human behaviour; we destroy it by contracting other relationships, by behaving differently." With the Occupy Movement and various protests against globalization, the early 21st century has seen a renewed interest in anarchist forms of political action, as well as a resurgence of the old stereotypes of anarchists as simply chaotic, destructive and violent. In this course, students will analyze the rich history of anarchism and the diverse forms that anarchist theory and practice have taken; they will also apply an anarchist way of understanding social problems to such contemporary issues as education, homelessness and the economy. By working with anarchist organizational tools like affinity groups and consensus, students will also develop their understanding of the ways in which anarchism links theory and practice so that anarchist methods prefigure their desired outcomes.

345-101-MQ VAMPIRES, WITCHES AND ZOMBIES... OH MY! (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

This course analyzes the origins and mythology of popular culture's most iconic symbols of everlasting life, power and intrigue and their influence on belief systems and their attendant rituals and practices. An exploration of human consciousness linked to magic, science and religion will help facilitate students understanding of how we make sense of the world around us. Students will be acquainted with the origins, influence and survival tactics thought necessary to successfully navigate within a world filled with imaginary and real threats and how inevitably these mythological creatures have become representative of contemporary issues. Various sources will be drawn upon including but not limited to anthropology, Greek, African & Native mythology, sociology and psychology.

345-101-MQ INTRODUCTION TO CROSSCULTURAL STUDIES (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

This course explores contact and communication which takes place between two or more persons from different cultures. We focus on theories of cultural difference and how people respond when faced with intercultural/cross cultural situations and circumstances. We will explore the history of Cross Cultural Relations from the spread of Islam to Colonialism and the European-Native American encounter; Theoretical notions such as Marginal Man, Heterophily, Ingroups and Outgroups, Cultural Relativism, stereotypes and the Authoritarian Personality; Verbal Communication, Non-verbal Communication and finally the impact of media images such as the Disney version of Aladdin.

345-101-MQ ONE WORLD, MANY CULTURES (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

This course provides a general introduction to international studies. It will focus on critical analysis and comparison of readings by writers from a number of cultures in the non-western world. Through these readings, students will learn how these cultures understand the life cycle, economy, gender, politics and spiritual experience. In doing so, they will develop perspectives which enable them to understand and appreciate the importance of culture in knowledge and life experience.

345-101-MQ THE DISCOVERY OF LANGUAGE (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

In this course students will examine the ways in which language in general, and certain Indo-European languages in particular, affect the ways in which knowledge is organized and used. Topics to be discussed include: the origins of language, the transition from oral cultures to literacy, the development of early writing systems, the evolution of the Indo-European languages, and (briefly) such philosophers of language as Vico, Herder, Saussure and Wittgenstein. Students will do exercises with Egyptian hieroglyphics, Greek, Latin, Anglo-Saxon, Middle English and Old French, as well as some modern languages.

345-101-MQ IT'S (NOT!) ONLY A MOVIE (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

When invited to think critically about cinema, many people will say “But it’s only a movie!” Movies are popular entertainment but they are also a modern art form with a history and an aesthetic language. In this course, we will examine this history. We will address the evolution of visual technologies, the development of cinema as a business and a mode of artistic expression. Students will be acquainted with important film movements, genres, and filmmakers. They will begin to develop the vocabulary and skills necessary to be an appreciative yet critical viewer of film and other media.

345-101-MQ FLESH AND BLOOD: THE BODY IN WESTERN CULTURE (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

In this course students will explore a number of historical and contemporary understandings of the body, and of physical differences of all sorts. The course aims to enrich students' personal and cultural perspectives on bodies and their recognition of the meanings and privileges that have been attached to particular bodies. It will examine historical approaches to the body, medical culture in the 19th Century, and finally contemporary understandings and questions about human bodies. Course materials will include both texts and visual images drawn from a variety of fields, ranging from science, to philosophy, literature and film.

345-101-MQ THE F WORD: FEMINISM IN THEORY AND PRACTICE (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

This course serves as an introduction the history of feminism as both a body of knowledge and a sphere of social struggle. Students will ask questions about what feminism looks like, who it is for, and what it offers us while examining contemporary feminist issues and interventions.

345-101-MQ ANTHROPOLOGY MATTERS! (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

The purpose of this course is to examine the importance of anthropology in the study of language, culture and mind and its relevancy to contemporary issues. Case studies, via qualitative methodologies, are used to help develop an understanding of human culture. The purpose of this course is to examine the importance of anthropology in the study of language, culture and mind and its relevancy to contemporary issues. Case studies, via qualitative methodologies, are used to help develop an understanding of human culture.

345-101-MQ A SENSE OF PLACE: THE LINK BETWEEN WHERE WE LIVE AND WHO WE ARE (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

Blending both the practical and theoretical, this course will help students understand the diversity of people around them, and in the process, to better understand themselves. Students will examine different socio-cultural patterns (the “melting pot”, multicultural mosaic, etc.) as well as individual experiences (the immigrant experience, ethnic communities, displaced peoples and migra- GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES HUMANITIES 35 GENERAL EDUCATION tions, the traveler in unfamiliar places, “back to the roots” movement, adopting new identities, etc.). Cultural identities at the community, national, and global levels will be examined.

345-101-MQ FOOD FOR THOUGHT (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

In the early 19th century, the French gastronome Brillant-Savarin said "tell me what you eat and I will tell you who you are". Today, it would be more accurate to say tell me what you eat and I will tell you who you are, where you stand on political issues, what values you hold, how healthy you are, what cultural group you belong to, how your economy functions, who your major trade partners are, the state of the environment and what you believe your role is in affecting social change. This course begins with a snapshot of the history of food production and then explores the human food habits and customs of different traditional and contemporary cultures. Recent food movements will be examined in order to discover new linkages between what we eat and who we are. This course also addresses key issues about how food is produced, processed, shipped, marketed, distributed and sold, and the global forces and institutions that play a role in these. Most importantly, students will be asked to look at their own food habits in order to asses the impact that these have on the local community, the country and the world.

345-101-MQ READING THE SCRIPTURES (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

In this course students will explore the form and content of the Hebrew Scriptures (the “Old Testament”), as well as the most common methods used to understand and interpret these texts. Students will examine the historical contexts within which the different parts of the Scriptures emerged, and how these contexts have influenced the nature of the texts. Similarly, students will consider the socio-historical contexts of both traditional and more modern modes of interpretation, and both Jewish and Christian readings of the Scriptures, in order to see how the context of the reader can affect the way she/he reads the texts. Students will also explore the extent to which such religious texts still resonate in the modern world. Students will apply a variety of interpretative strategies to selected texts, and will analyze the strengths and weaknesses of these strategies. Examples will include textual, historical, archaeological, literary and philosophical approaches.

345-101-MQ UNDERSTANDING SEXUALITY (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

Sex is a basic human activity whose physical and physiological aspects are relatively simple and straightforward, but sexuality — the psychological, social, cultural and moral values and meanings attached to sex — are anything but. In this course students will examine the ways in which sex is understood and conceptualized, as well the contextual factors affecting the historical development of these ideas. The emphasis will be placed on identifying conflicting and changing sexual values concerning marriage, premarital and extramarital sex, reproduction, gender roles, sexual orientation and deviant or subversive sexualities. Students will also analyze the historical development of sexuality and sexology from their ancient roots to the 20 th and 21 st centuries, as expressed by diverse voices, both male and female, both gay and straight.

345-101-MQ RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

This course explores the influence of cultural values and norms on the organization of the production, distribution or marketing, and the consumption of goods and services at both the local and global levels of the world economy. It also examines the social and environmental impact of the globalization of the consumer and studies material objects and technologies and their role in the production of everyday social life and culture. It also examines how popular culture has shaped our understanding of the ‘self’ and the consequences of stereotyping enforcing the need to adapt to ever growing unrealistic expectations and demands of physical beauty within society.

345-101-MQ MYTH & EPISTEMOLOGY (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

The focus of this course will be on knowledge (epistemology) and myths. In particular, this course will examine myths from around the world with the goal of offering insights into the human condition, moral and ethical questions, questions about reality, human concepts of the supernatural, and human relationships. A secondary goal of this course would be to examine whether there any recurring patterns or comparative features in myths from different cultures. If yes, what is their significance? In addition, we will explore how versions of myth cohere and contradict, and how different societies adapt myth to express their own meaning. This course will place a particular emphasis on Hellenic myths.

345-101-MQ EXPLOITATION: FROM MONEY TO MEDIA (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

Most of us agree that exploitation—taking advantage of someone or something’s vulnerabilities for gain—is wrong. It is much harder, however, to agree on where exactly healthy opportunity ends and where exploitation begins. This course considers the ways that the media turn people’s personal dramas into entertainment and make a profit all the while. We will explore the production circumstances and audiences of various media throughout history, from news to movies to reality TV, to better understand the dynamics of money and power at play.

345-101-MQ THAT'S A FACT (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

Facts seem to be increasingly out of style. Yet the reality remains that the everyday person wants and needs facts to function, to be happy and to seek their best future. Thus this course will tackle such unpopular topics as how to tell Truth from truth and how to know what you know. We will spend some time on the history of ideas in Western society, examining philosophies and methods developed over the course of centuries to understand and critique truth. We will then examine how these rules are still relevant in the context of some contemporary issues.

345-101-MQ IDENTITY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

The students taking this course will explore expressions of different individual, social, cultural, religious and ethnic identities that can be encountered through the material and literary evidence of the ancient world, in particular with respect to ancient Greece and Rome. Together, we will explore what these identities can teach us about ancient societies and the individuals who contributed to them, as well as what we can learn about our own identities and our own society upon reflection on the ancient world.

345-101-MQ WHAT DO MUSEUMS KNOW? (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

More than just imposing buildings and impressive collections, museums are a way of thinking about the world. Museums shape knowledge as much as they store it. This course charts a range of ways of thinking about the world of museums, from hoarders to collectors. It will study the impact of museums on our view of the past, and the implications for the future.

345-101-MQ HUMAN-ANIMAL STUDIES (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

How much do we really know about animals, and how far does our own identity as human beings depend on non-humans? This course introduces Human-Animal Studies, a rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field of knowledge that researches the manifold interactions of humans and animals within communities, families, religions, politics, the law, ethics, and artistic forms. Animals have long been integral to human society for companionship, food, transportation, and entertainment. How do these interactions dictate our relations to wild and domestic animals, and how do humans duplicate these relations through systemic inequalities based on gender or ethnicity? Human-Animal Studies gives us the tools to think through everything from zoos, factory farming, fur coats, and hunting to sports, spiritual symbolism, and the family dog.

345-101-MQ THE MEANING OF MARXISM (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

The Canadian socialist Bill Livant once famously quipped, “When a liberal sees a beggar, he says the system isn’t working; when a Marxist does, he says it is.” This suggestion that capitalism is an inherently unstable system that serves to make the rich richer and the poor poorer is usually scorned by the system’s supporters as proof that Marxists are “economically illiterate,” but the continuing economic crisis may suggest that the Marxist understanding of political economy continues to be relevant. This course introduces students to political economy as a field of study, and to Marxism as an analytical framework for understanding such concepts as class and the state. Students will analyze the basic philosophical, economic and political components of Marxist theory, and apply them to contemporary situations in Canadian society. Students will also explore the main criticisms of, and alternatives to, Marxism in order to critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of Marxism as a way of understanding the political economy of capitalism.

345-101-MQ WESTERN PHILOSOPHY & THE STUDY OF KNOWLEDGE (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to epistemology (i.e. study of knowledge) from the perspective of Western philosophy. This will entail delving into what such questions as: What is knowledge? What conditions must be met in order to possess knowledge? What does it take to know something, rather than merely believe it? What are our best sources of knowledge? What is reality? How do we know? We will study answers to these questions by turning our attention to ancient and contemporary philosophers. The works that we will be studying will not only elucidate the various line of inquiries but also the debate between those inquiries as articulated by various philosophers - often across the span of centuries. As such we will come to see important elements of continuity and change throughout the centuries. More importantly we will see how these philosophical inquiries form an intelligible whole. An additional aim is to introduce students to the history of ideas and their development in Western philosophical thought.

345-101-MQ JOURNEYS OF EXPLORATION (3-1-3) 60 HRS / 2 1⁄3 CR

Since human societies have existed, we have felt compelled to venture outside of them. Whether for reasons of faith, knowledge, expansion, trade, or curiosity, the motives for seeking out new lands and societies are many-faceted, and are revealing of the beliefs and attitudes inherent in these actions. This course will trace the history and impact of exploration from pre-history to the present around the globe, from early voyages across land and water to modern explorations of deep sea and space.

CATEGORY 102: WORLD VIEWS

MINISTERIAL OBJECTIVES

To apply a critical thought process to world views, specifically:

  1. to describe world views;
  2. to explain the major ideas, values and implications of a world view;
  3. to organize the ideas, values and experiences of a world view into coherent patterns;
  4. to compare world views;
  5. to convey the ideas, attitudes, and experiences of the societies, or groups studied.

NOTE: NOT ALL COURSES WILL BE OFFERED EACH TERM.

345-102-MQ A CULTURAL ANALYSIS OF QUILT-MAKING (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Taking as a starting point the warmth, both physical and emotional, and the narrative symbolism represented by the quilt, this class will explore the world views of the many different cultures that have or had some form of quilting as an element of their material culture. As quilts were traditionally primarily made by women, this is an ideal forum to unpick some of the interpretations of the quilting bee as a site for feminist freedom and expression. Case studies will be conducted to examine themes such as the commodification of culture and quilting for activism. Students will also have the chance to gain a practical experience of the social and cultural power of quilting by interacting with the Quilt of Belonging project based in Canada.

345-102-MQ ZEN AND THE ART OF MOTORCYCLE STUDIES (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course examines the cultural phenomenon of motorcycling and its use in music, literature, film, advertising and art world wide. The study of motorcycles as a form of cultural icon also serves as a basis for discussing gender, class, identity and community.

345-102-MQ I SING THE BODY ELECTRIC: SEXUALITY IN WESTERN WORLD VIEWS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course studies the concept of a "world view" and the specific world views of different cultures in Western history by examining different cultural models of the role and place of sexuality in the lives of human beings. We will examine the relationship between the nature of a society, and what its members think such things as sex, sexuality and sexual orientation are or can be, as well as what they think these things say about themselves. This course does this by looking at four different periods: the ancient world, the early modern world, the late modern world, and the 20th century. This course will explore a multiplicity of voices, both male and female, gay and straight.

345-102-MQ FROM POLIS TO SLUM: LIVING IN CITIES (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Understanding the history of cities, their patterns, health, growth, and decline, is essential to understanding a world view which we inhabit and which shapes our daily lives, determining how we live and will continue to live on this planet. Students will engage case studies of historical and contemporary cities along with first-hand explorations of the local urban environment, using both textual evidence and first-hand observation to explore what defines contemporary urban life at the local and global scales.

345-102-MQ CHINESE WORLD VIEW AND CULTURE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The course has two components: The first being that North Americans and Europeans, see China through a unique perspective and that Westerners’ cultural programming colors to a large extent how we see China and our perspective of “things” Chinese. Questions to be addressed include: what are the most persistent images of China in the West? How have these images developed and changed over time? Students will study written records left by western visitors to China, including Marco Polo and the Jesuit missionary Matteo Ricci, and analyze films/videos that feature various stereotypes of China and Chinese people. The second component looks to answer questions such as: How do Chinese people reason their way through the world? In what ways are these patterns different from Western patterns? In what ways are they similar? Students draw on research from psychology, philosophy and linguistics in the search for understanding.

345-102-MQ ENVISIONING POWER (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is focused on how to we as individuals see power in the world around us. Students will practice seeing the landscape through different frames and perspectives, seeking out signs of structure, of control, and of exclusion. In doing this, we will also imagine how we are seen by institutions of power – through systems of surveillance, policing, and incarceration; through systems of private property; and through the construction of the national citizen. Students will consider how both the way that we see power in the world and the way that we are seen by those with power is linked to the kinds of bodies we inhabit, our personal experiences, and our material conditions.

345-102-MQ THE POWER OF SEX (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

We are all conscious, on some level, of the power of sex. This course will focus on the social nature of sex and by extension, sexuality and gender and their relationship with some main aspects of power. In the first part of the course we look at how we learn about sex from a number of sources such as the media, religion, the family and the state. We will then examine just how people make sense of these often competing messages to form their own sexualities and the implications of this. We will also focus on the relationship between gender and sexuality and the role of power and dominance in sexual relationships manifesting itself in some cases as sexual terrorism. This course will finally attempt to make sense of the market, or commercial power of sex by looking at the pornography industry, sexual tourism, prostitution, the sexualization of children and tweens, and the sex in the advertising industry.

345-102-MQ THE VIEW FROM THE AVANT-GARDE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Surrealism! Futurism! DADA! Pop Art! Each of these different movements have a connection to the turbulent history and culture of the 20th century. Modernity and Modernism are terms used to describe the massive changes to the world brought about by the political, social and violent conflicts of that age. This course will study the impact of real life on the big ideas and events of modernity and how these issues still affect us today.

345-102-MQ ANOTHER WORLD IS POSSIBLE! ALTERNATIVES TO CAPITALISM (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Capitalism informs how we live, how relate to each other, how we understand the world, how we dream. In this course we will analyze the values, assumptions, understandings and implications of living under capitalism before turning towards an examination of a number movements that seek to create alternatives to capitalism including socialism, Marxism, anarchism, feminism, environmentalism and sustainability, and anti-oppression frameworks.

345-102-MQ COLD WAR WORLD VIEW (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The changes to the world during and after the Second World War were wide-ranging and permanent. The conflicts, fears and politics of war-time along with the industries and products of the post war era changed the visual, cultural and philosophical landscape forever. This course will investigate the ideas, the events, and the lived experiences that defined this era with particular attention to how it still defines our lives today.

345-102-MQ ISLAMIC WORLD VIEWS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The importance of understanding Islam, both as the second largest religion in the world and as a rapidly growing religious community within Quebec and Canada, becomes clearer every day. At the same time, the challenges posed by Islam of understanding the religion on an intellectual level, and of integrating the community on a social level, can be particularly difficult because, unlike most contemporary Western ideas of religion, Islam traditionally views the political and social order as the critical focus of religious life, treating religion, politics, and culture as indivisible. Islamic theology, law, way of life, and the community formed by the faithful are meant to be held together in a coherent cultural statement that stems from the Qur’an and related traditions, and that lays heavy stress on law and norms of behavior to make its religious statements. Of course, it is this very difference that makes it both important and rewarding to compare the religious worldviews of the West and of Islam. It is also important to understand that Islam is a large and complex religious system, and that within this system different ways of reading its foundational texts have produced different ways of expressing of the basis Islamic world view, even though many Westerners think that all Muslims are the same.

345-102-MQ ANARCHIST WORLDVIEWS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

With the Occupy Movement and various protests against globalization, the early 21st century has seen a renewed interest in anarchist forms of political action, as well as a resurgence of the old stereotypes of anarchists as simply chaotic, destructive and violent. Students will analyze the rich history of anarchism and the diverse worldviews that have developed within the anarchist tradition, and the different forms that anarchist theory and practice have taken. By working with anarchist organizational tools like affinity groups and consensus, students will also develop their understanding of the ways in which anarchism links theory and practice so that anarchist methods prefigure their desired outcomes.

345-102-MQ IT'S ALL GREEK TO ME (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will learn about how the ancient Greeks viewed their world through the critical examination of ancient Greek art, religion, philosophy, literature, and mythology. Students will examine the origins and evolution of each of these important aspects of ancient Greek society and will analyze and compare what kind of influences the ancient Greek worldviews have left on our modern, Western worldviews.

345-102-MQ COMING OUT: GAY AND LESBIAN WORLD VIEWS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course examines the historical and the contemporary experiences of gays and lesbians in western culture in order to see how dissenting individuals and groups form their own world views, sometimes in concert with the mainstream, and sometimes in opposition to it. People who are attracted to members of their own sex have always existed, but they have usually been marginalized and suppressed, often to the point of invisibility. This invisibility forced them to conform and assimilate, or, as time went on, to form sub-cultures of their own. As these new communities have grown larger and stronger, gays and lesbians have developed a perspective that challenges the mainstream world view, not just about homosexuality, but on a wide range of social, political and religious issues.

345-102-MQ DOES ART MATTER? (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Students will address current issues in the arts in this course, such as:

  • What is art? Does everyone have a right to artistic expression?
  • Beliefs and action through art
  • Taste: aesthetics and culture
  • Self-identity: Cultural appropriation and cultural definition
  • Should art be for sale?
  • Art and crime: destruction and looting
  • Art for all: art collecting, art dissemination, and art loss

345-102-MQ WORK-WORK-WORK (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In one way or another, most students at Champlain-Lennoxville are pursuing a course of studies in order to secure gainful employment in the future. The purpose of this course is to take a step back and reflect on the meaning of work, an activity that will occupy an increasingly significant portion of their waking lives as they move into the future. To borrow a few words from the contemporary philosopher Alain de Botton, this course begins by asking “what our society holds to be the purpose of work.” It then turns to a number of other societies, both ancient and modern and western and non-western, in order to consider how their understanding of the nature of work differs from our own. One of the goals of this course is to give students the tools necessary to reflect on the significance of work in their own lives.

345-102-MQ THE GREEK HERO (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will analyze the concept of a "world view," and the specific worldviews of different cultures in Western history, by examining different cultural models of the ideal person, or "hero." Today we hear about many different kinds of heroes: sports heroes, war heroes, the hero who saves children from burning buildings, the hero of a novel. But what do they all have in common? What do different kinds of heroes tell us about different people's understanding of the world and humanity's place within it? How and why have our ideas about heroism changed over time? It goes without saying that there is a relationship between the nature of a society and the kind of qualities it looks for in its heroes. Because many elements of the original Greek ideas of heroism have continued to be fundamental and pervasive in later models of the hero in Western thought, this course returns to the Greek roots of the idea and traces how the inter-relationships between heroes and their societies have developed in the West since ancient Greece, using cross-cultural comparisons to illuminate the similarities without blurring the differences. Students will also be asked to distinguish between different concepts of the hero, and to reflect critically on their own heroes, and the heroes of their society.

345-102-MQ CROSS CULTURAL CONCEPTS OF CHILDHOOD (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course involves the study of childhood as a symbolic construction of social reality. Students will be given the unique opportunity to examine this social phenomenon as it developed throughout the 20 th Century in Western society. What is childhood? How does childhood shape our understanding of the world? Does childhood inhibit children and adolescents from understanding the complexities of adulthood? Is there a right or wrong way of experiencing childhood? Cross cultural comparisons from various parts of the world including but not limited to Eastern and African perspectives of childhood will be critically examined. This course draws upon various academic disciplines such as psychology, cultural and social anthropology, sociology and social geography, to name but a few, as the idea of childhood is deconstructed in order to better understand the rationale and reasoning behind Western views regarding childhood. Cultural relativity will be encouraged while examining opposing ideas and forms of childhood.

345-102-MQ VOICES OF THE DISPOSSESSED (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In the world today, approximately 12 million people have fled their countries because of a well-founded fear of persecution. These people are called refugees. Another 25 million have fled their homes for similar reasons but because they have not crossed their country’s borders, they are called internally displaced people. Conflict, political or economic oppression and environmental crisis are all reasons for flight in different situations. Whatever the cause, all of these people suffer extraordinary loss while trying to sustain hope beyond hope that their lies can be changed. Through examination of the causes of displacement, the experience of displaced people, and the humanitarian efforts to respond to their needs and help them rebuild their lives, students will develop a better understanding of the world view of the dispossessed and of forced migration as a feature of the 21st century world.

345-102-MQ VALUING CULTURE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

How do we place a value on culture? Which cultures do we privilege? We assess and evaluate cultural output in a variety of ways, including informal systems of taste and aesthetics, popular arts criticism, government policy, and institutions like the art market and museums. This course looks at the cultural attitudes and priorities embedded in our value systems, considering how Western world views impact the kinds of art and culture we take seriously and how we engage with non-Western cultures. In this course, students encounter philosophical aesthetics and popular criticism across the spectrum of high culture and popular culture, such as movies, theatre, pop music, sports, literature, and comics.

345-102-MQ MEDIA MATTER: MEDIA AND FAN CULTURES (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

From Trekkers to Ringers, Potterheads to Twihards, supporters of Manchester United to the Vancouver Canucks, fans often get a bad rap. This course will acquaint students with the inner worlds of these groups and many others, considering the ways that popular media can provide us with a sense of identity. It will explore how we “make meaning” in our everyday lives from the narratives of books, movies, television shows, sporting activities, celebrities, music, historical events and personalities, and many other sources.

345-102-MQ ATHEISM (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The belief that there is no god –has been around as long as religious belief itself. Many atheists have criticized the institutions that often go along with faith, claiming that these institutions are destructive and immoral. In this course, we will examine critically a variety of ideas that are associated with (or claimed by) atheists, including secularism, rationalism, humanism and agnosticism. We will examine the arguments for and against religion and consider atheism as a belief system with its own articles of faith, its own canonical texts and its own mission.

345-102-MQ WHO’S YOUR DADDY? THE CULTURE OF FATHERHOOD (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Drawing from various cultural contexts this course will examine the nature and function of fatherhood, both from a biological perspective and as a social and cultural identity. Existing concepts and ideas of fatherhood will be compared and contrasted with the changing nature and function of both male and female roles within Western societies. We will explore how the rise of women’s rights and equality within patriarchal societies as North America and Western Europe has inevitably opened new opportunities for men to take on certain duties and attributes traditionally associated with women. Throughout this course students are encouraged to challenge their pre-existing ideas of what constitutes both fatherhood and motherhood. This course draws upon various academic disciplines such as psychology, cultural and social anthropology, sociology and social geography, and anthrozoology to name but a few, in order to deconstruct and redefine the idea of fatherhood in the 21st Century.

345-102-MQ AS THE ROMANS DID (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

"When in Rome, do as the Romans do." The old cliché reflects the importance of the ancient city that was for centuries the political and military capital of the Western world, and for even longer an artistic and cultural centre of European civilization. In this course will examine the origins and evolution of the world view that animated and sustained the ancient Romans as they expanded from a small town into a vast empire governing diverse peoples with a social and cultural cohesion that endured well beyond the empire's military collapse. Students will explore the various ways in which this world view was expressed in the cultural, social, religious and political lives of the Romans. Students will also compare the Roman world view to those of other ancient peoples, and identify the continuing influence of the Romans in contemporary world views.

345-102-MQ EXISTENTIALISM (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Angst. Anguish. Nothingness. Despair. Isolation. Ennui. The Irrational. The Past. The Other. The Gaze. The Authentic. Radical Freedom. Creativity. Style. From Kierkegaard to Sartre to Monty Python, Existentialists illuminate and face up to the absurdities of human life. What does it mean to be human? Does my life have meaning or purpose? How can I live morally when it is clear that the world is so often a place of despair, inequality, and confusion? This class introduces and surveys the major philosophers, literary artists, and filmmakers who adhere to the Existentialist worldview. As we shall see, Existentialists disdain the neat and set answers to life offered by religion, science, reason, mass culture, and our current preoccupation with technology, comfort, and security. Instead, they insist that the only meaning to be found in life is that which starts from a real encounter with one's self. An authentic life is thus only possible when lived with a passion and sincerity that accepts the freedom and responsibility inherent in the sometimes unbearable lightness of being.

345-102-MQ SPORT, SELF AND SOCIETY (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In 1954 the first post-war German national soccer team defeated the heavily favoured Hungarians to win the World Cup, a victory still referred to by Germans as the ‘Miracle of Bern.’ In 1972, at the height of the Cold War, Paul Henderson scored a last minute goal for Team Canada propelling them to victory over the Soviet Union in the Summit Series. Canadians still refer to this as the ‘Goal Heard Around the World.’ Later, in 1980, as the Cold War raged on, Team USA pulled off what is referred to as the ‘Miracle on Ice’, defeating the Soviet hockey team at the Lake Placid Olympics to win gold. In 1995 a post-Apartheid South African team defeated the heavily favoured New Zealand All Black to win the Rugby World Cup, a victory used by former prisoner turned President Nelson Mandela to promote reconciliation between white and black South Africans. Love them or hate them there is no denying that sports play an important part in our society. In this course we will look at sport from the perspective of the fan to see how cheering for a team, national or local, plays a part in the building of identities – personal, group and national.

PROGRAM-SPECIFIC (BLOCK B) ETHICAL ISSUES

MINISTERIAL OBJECTIVES

Introduction: These courses have been designed to further the competencies developed in the general education courses; they require students to apply these competencies in a new context. Students will develop a critical and autonomous approach to ethical values in general and to values conveyed more specifically by their professional area or field of knowledge. These courses will also provide the occasion for students to consolidate personal and social ethical values

NOTE: NOT ALL COURSES WILL BE OFFERED EACH TERM.

SOCIAL SCIENCE, SPECIAL CARE COUNSELLING

345-BEK-LE HUMAN RIGHTS PERSPECTIVE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Human rights conflicts and questions permeate almost all national and international issues today. Students in this course will examine first and foremost the philosophical, historical and ideological factors which form the bases for currently held concepts of human rights. Second, they will investigate situations in the world and in Canada today which have evoked criticism from human rights advocates in order to clarify some specific problems related to definition and defense of human rights. Students will be asked to explain the ethical dimensions of these situations and to propose and justify solutions or courses of action.

345-BEK-LE VIOLENCE AND NONVIOLENCE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In the 17th century, English political philosopher Thomas Hobbes wrote “Covenants, without the sword, are but words.” In our 21st century, violence is still used to solve political conflicts and to punish wrongdoers. In a world where violence is an omnipresent reality, from wars to cyber-bullying, without forgetting the violence found in the entertainment industry, being able to identify and define this phenomenon is increasingly important. What, exactly, is violence, and what are its various manifestations? When, if ever, is violence justified, and what are the theories that support this justification? These questions will be some departure points from which to attack our topic. Finally, we will mediate our exploration of violence by opening the dialogue to voices of nonviolence like Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr, and techniques of nonviolent conflict resolution like boycotts and sit-ins.

345-BEK-LE CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES IN SOCIAL SCIENCE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course examines some of the central theories of moral philosophy and applies them to contemporary ethical issues in the Social Sciences. From various ethical perspectives, students will explore issues in human rights, multiculturalism and diversity, sexual morality, environmental ethics, and others.

345-BEK-LE DOCUMENTARY ETHICS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will approach the discussion of ethics through the lens of the documentary camera. Arguments are made with words, statements and coherent messages, but increasingly, they are also made with images. Arguments in the form of images overwhelm our cultural landscape. Having the ability to see, understand and dissect these arguments will give students the tools to understand the complex ethics of the modern world.

345-BEK-LE THE BEAST WITHIN (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course involves the study of human culture as a symbolic construction of reality. Students will be given the unique opportunity to look at the greatest threat planet earth has ever encountered: humanity. Yet, despite humanity’s fragile position within the natural world, one aspect maintains our supremacy above all other life, namely culture. What is culture and is culture unique to humans? How has culture shaped our understanding of our role in the world in the greater context of the cosmos? As humans are both the self-appointed guardians and destructive force of our planet, students will examine the social and environmental impact of human culture on the everyday lives of animals. Humanity’s God Complex has led to the extinction and destruction of various ecosystems across the globe as it attempts to fulfill its wants rather than its needs. By examining case studies showing evidence of animal life with complex forms of intelligence, the concept of animal rights take on an entirely new meaning. The works of Jared Diamond, Desmond Morris, Michael Newton, Hurley Nudds and Hilda Kean, to name but a few, will be reviewed as we investigate alternatives to our way of life by reclaiming the very side of humanity which we have forsaken: our inner animal.

345-BEK-LE CITIZENSHIP AND CIVIL SOCIETY (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Do citizens know their rights? Do they understand their duties? In Citizenship and Civil Society, students will study the Canadian and Quebecois legal, political, economic and social rights and freedoms. The class will outline the fundamental goods, beliefs and principles that underlie social life in the two territories as well as examine how the elements of its common public culture make these rights and freedoms possible.

345-BEK-LE JUSTICE, PROGRESS AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Are human rights universal? Is terrorism ever justified? Do affluent nations have an obligation to help poorer ones? All of these are ethical questions. None has an easy answer. In spite of the fact that ethical issues are so prevalent in international affairs, international ethics as an academic field has just come into its own in recent years. The dominance of other models of understanding international relations pushed ethics into the background of international relations scholarship. Nevertheless, as of late there has been a surge of scholarly interest in this area of study. This course will explore key themes in international ethics and examine different theoretical approaches to related ethical questions.

345-BEK-LE COLONIALISM IN CANADA (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The goal of this course is to better understand our own personal positions and ethical obligations as residents in the Canadian settler-state. Students will actively consider and discuss ethical issues surrounding colonization on Turtle Island (Canada) with the aid of works by indigenous writers and filmmakers.

345-BEK-LE MORAL ISSUES IN THE MODERN WORLD (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course we will relevant ethical theories and consider a number of contemporary moral issues including:
• are people mostly driven by economic motivations, or by desire for status and recognition, or belonging and contribution?
• can people who are immersed in nature naturally value and protect it?
• are humans mostly competitive or mostly cooperative, mostly individualistic or mostly social?
• is a spiritual commitment crucial for progress towards a more desirable and lasting relationship with nature, or with other people, or not?
• do we have an inherent (and eventually suicidal) drive to expand our powers and takings, or can learn to live well and appropriately on our only planet?

This course takes an historical approach to these questions and others. It looks for insights and answers over the sweep of the human experience on Earth.

345-BEK-LE WEAPONIZING ANTHROPOLOGY: PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN RIGHTS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Through case analysis, this course examines the abuse of anthropological knowledge and ethnographic methods by military and intelligence agencies throughout the last century and the subsequent consequences on target populations.

345-BEK-LE ETHICS, HAPPINESS AND THE GOOD LIFE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Ethics, Happiness and the Good Life What is happiness? Is happiness simply an emotion? What, if any, is the relationship between the good life and happiness? Does money and, subsequently, the material things that money can buy, lead to happiness? Does fame, glory and honours lead to happiness? Can happiness be found in the pursuit of knowledge? What is the relationship between leisure and happiness? Is happiness to be found in the elimination of our desires? Does friendship with like-minded spirits lead to happiness? Does freedom of choice curtail or enhances happiness? Can happiness be pursued? Is tranquility (ataraxia) to be preferred to happiness? Is tranquility to be achieved by controlling our responses to external events? In this course we will explore the above-mentioned questions by examining texts from the fields of philosophy, psychology, evolutionary biology and, to a lesser degree, religious studies.

CREATIVE ARTS, LIBERAL ARTS, AND VISUAL ARTS

345-BEL-LE ART AND MORALITY (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Everyone, whether they are an artist or not, has beliefs, ideas and practices about the meaning of art. Because these beliefs are not often examined, conflict between artists and communities can arouse powerful, even dangerous, reactions. This is a course that will require students to think about those boundaries and to analyze their own moral reasoning and ethical practices. Using contemporary issues drawn from various forms of media, students will be encouraged to develop and articulate their own ethical framework.

345-BEL-LE ETHICS IN THE ARTS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In the first part of this course students will learn about and critique a selection of basic theories grounding ethical thought and then practice applying these theories to a wide variety of examples through short response assignments. In the second part, students will work to apply these strategies to particular ethical questions or case studies relevant to the arts by creating seminar presentations in small groups. Topics covered in the course may include copyright and reproduction, re-performance, preservation, censorship, ownership, sampling, cultural appropriation, street art/graffiti and public space, art as protest, and aesthetics vs. politics.

345-BEL-LE CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course examines competing positions on a number of the major moral problems facing contemporary society. Topics for study here may include abortion; euthanasia; punishment; pornography and censorship; the treatment of children; poverty and social justice; freedom; equality; rights and duties.

345-BEL-LE COMMUNICATION ETHICS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Talleyrand once argued that "Language was invented so that people could conceal their thoughts from one another." Indeed, language and communication are fraught with ethical questions because, although they are often used with positive intentions, they are all too often also manipulated to construct and to maintain power imbalances, to hide the truth, or to alienate those considered to be outsiders. How can we use communication to deal ethically with the differences that exist between persons, in organizations and businesses, in the public and political spheres, and across cultures and languages? In this postmodern digital age that embodies difference, how can ethics help us to communicate with and to learn from “the Other” through meaningful and genuine dialogue?

345-BEL-LE MODERN MORAL ISSUES (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Students will apply some of the main theories of moral philosophy to ethical issues arising in modern multicultural societies due to the presence of conflicting religious, moral and political views, or different linguistic and cultural communities. Topics will include: conflicts between religion, culture and equality rights; conflicts between individual and group rights; and the ethics of governmental actions that encourage or discourage multiculturalism and diversity.

SCIENCE, COMPUTER SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS

345-BES-LE THINKING ABOUT SCIENCE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course we will be looking at the moral and ethical implications about what scientists do and the implications of their discoveries. To do this we will first have to understand the “science” of thinking morally and then apply this way of thinking to current issues in the sciences. A major component of this course will be the integrative assignment in which the student will be allowed to pursue a moral issue from any branch of the sciences.

345-BES-LE THINKING SCIENCE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Good science requires not just correct ideas; it also requires thinking well. This course addresses the challenges of doing thoughtful science, particularly for students intending to enter the natural or health sciences. Part of the course is concerned with the nature of science itself, as a knowledge-enterprise and social institution. At the same time, the course concerns issues that will directly challenge scientists, health care professionals and technicians throughout their careers (i.e. informed consent, experimentation on human and animal subjects, fertility enhancement, abortion, assisted suicide, euthanasia, biotechnology). These are also issues of increasing urgency for all citizens and participants in science and technology-driven societies. Students will be asked to think critically about these issues and develop the vocabulary and analytical framework to make decisions about their own values and ethics.

ACCOUNTING AND MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY, COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

345-BEM-LE ETHICS FOR THE BUSINESS WORLD (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will take a look at ethical thinking in the business world from a variety of perspectives. These will include: applied and professional ethical systems, corporate responsibility, intellectual property, corporate fraud and white collar crime, green technologies and workplaces, multicultural business communication and social media in the working world. We will consider a multitude of case studies through textual, film and online sources. Students will leave with a better understanding of their rights and responsibilities in a globalized business environment.

345-BEM-LE ETHICS OF DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Digital communications technologies and platforms impact our workplaces and personal lives in profound ways, many of which go unnoticed in our day-to-day interactions. The adoption of these emerging tools at work and at home raises a new set of ethical questions that warrant serious attention. This course examines the ethics of digital communications through a range of approaches including classical moral philosophy, case studies, policy and legislation, and cultural analysis. Course themes cover a range of contemporary challenges confronting citizens, businesses, and government, such as copyright and intellectual property, online privacy, surveillance, internet governance, and digital piracy and cybercrime. This course addresses current events and real workplace scenarios in the realms of corporate responsibility, social networking, media piracy, and computer security, among others. Students will develop knowledge and strategies for managing the ethical issues they will face as they move into their careers.

NURSING

345-BEN-LE NURSING ETHICS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In Nursing Ethics, students will learn about the reasoning behind the many values and practices they encounter in their everyday training as student nurses. Through in-depth study of case studies, students will learn of the history of ethics generally and, more specifically, that of nursing ethics. Students will learn of the values of the profession within contexts, in theory and history, while their Nursing program courses have and will place these into practice. The OIIQ and CNA ethical codes will inform our discussions. Students will come to understand the ethical dimensions of their own practice through the sharing of experiences and encounters with others, along with greater reflection through journal entries.

LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION

345-BET-LE ETHICAL ISSUES IN LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

In this course students will explore some of the central theories of moral philosophy in the Western tradition and practice their application to the major ethical issues arising out of various situations involving language differences within societies. Students will develop their analytical and reasoning skills in the general area of ethical debate by examining such issues as the ethical implications of the connections between language and cultural identity; the ethical challenges arising from the political and social roles of language, especially "national" languages; the ethical dilemmas posed by the death of languages; and the ethical implications of government and corporate actions to encourage or discourage pluralism, multiculturalism and linguistic diversity.

NOTE; SOME COURSE TITLES MAY DIFFER SLIGHLY ON STUDENTS' TRANSCRIPTS: PLEASE REFER TO COURSE NUMBERS.


Apply here