Academics

Complementary


All students are required to choose TWO complementary courses selected from categories outside their program. If both complementary courses are selected from the same category, one must be chosen from Set E and one from Set F. All complementary courses are 45 hours and are worth 2 credits. Not all courses are offered every year.


Social Science
students may select from Categories 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

Science
students may select from Categories 1, 3, 4, 5, 6.

Computer Science and Mathematics
students may select from Categories 1, 3, 5, 6.

Creative Arts
students may select from Categories 1, 2, 3, 4, 6.

Languages and Communication
students may select from Categories 1, 2, 4, 5, 6.

Visual Arts
students may select from Categories 1, 2, 3, 4, 6.

Liberal Arts
students must see specific Liberal Arts program information regarding Optional courses (previously called Electives).

Nursing
students may select from Categories 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

Special Care Counselling
students may select from Categories 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

Accounting and Management Technology
students may select from Categories 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 but may not take courses in Business.

Computer Science Technology
students may select from Categories 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 but may not take courses in Business.

Total courses : 1

Total credits : 2

CATEGORY 1: SOCIAL SCIENCES

Geography of the Eastern Townships 320-BED-LE
Introduction to Western Civilization 330-BEA-03
Psychology's Greatest Hits 350-BEB-LE
Discovering Psychology Through Film 350-BED-LE
The Politics of Violence 385-BFB-LE
Sociology of Unequal Relations 387-BEC-LE

CATEGORY 2: SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Forensic Science 105-BFB-LE
Astronomy 203-BEA-03
Rainbows, Lasers, Holograms and Other Visual Wonders 203-BFA-03
Natural Hazards 320-BEB-LE
Building College Skills 354-BEA-LE
Becoming An Active Learner 354-BFA-LE

CATEGORY 3: MODERN LANGUAGE

Elementary Spanish I 607-BEA-03
Elementary Spanish II 607-BFA-03
Elementary German I 609-BEA-03
Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture 613-BEA-LE

CATEGORY 4: MATHEMATIC LITERACY AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

Multimedia 420-BED-03
Computer Skills for Commerce 420-BFM-LE
Computer Skills for Science 420-BFR-LE
Computer Skills for Social Science 420-BFS-LE

CATEGORY 5: ART AND AESTHETICS

Painting 510-BFA-03
Sculpture 510-BFB-03
Digital Photography 510-BFD-LE
Introduction to Drawing 510-BFE-LE
Art History Basics 520-BEE-LE
Film Study 530-BEA-03
Music Appreciation 550-BEA-03
Music Dossier I 550-BFB-03

CATEGORY 6: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES

Introduction to Criminology 310-BEE-LE (365-BEE-LE)
Mapping My World 320-BEF-LE (365-BEF-LE)
Awakening to the World: Approaches to Eastern Thought 340-BEA-LE (365-BEA-LE)
The Creative I 340-BEC-LE (365-BEC-LE)

CATEGORY 1: SOCIAL SCIENCES

320-BED-LE GEOGRAPHY OF THE EASTERN TOWNSHIPS (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The Eastern Townships region is a familiar and accessible space to introduce students to the fundamentals of Geography. Students will learn to appreciate the landscapes of the region by developing observation and interpretation skills through field trips, guest lectures and mapping activities. The course will focus on landscape change: Potential themes could include the spread of the agricultural frontier, the changing cultural geography of the region, the introduction of the area as a recreational retreat, and the evolution of regional boundaries.

330-BEA-03 INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN CIVILIZATION (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will provide students with an understanding of Western Civilization and of how their world has been shaped by historical events. Students will be introduced to the fundamental characteristics of Western Civilization, and will be able to trace the evolution of our civilization in both time and space. Topics to be covered include a discussion of the tools and methods of the historian, and the place of history in the social sciences. Students will be introduced to the major themes of Western Civilization, including democracy, totalitarianism, revolution, imperialism, culture and conflict. Upon completion of the course students will be able to explain the basic concepts used in the study of history, correctly interpret a historical document, explain at least one major event or key figure in relation to the development of Western Civilization, and articulate various viewpoints as they relate to a specific historical event.

350-BEB-LE PSYCHOLOGY'S GREATEST HITS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Psychology’s Greatest Hits is a complementary course intended to introduce psychological concepts to non Social Science students. The course will expose students to classic studies that have been done in the various fields of psychology, many of which have changed the way we think about human behaviour and mental processes. Students will learn the theoretical and conceptual bases of each research study, explore its results and implications, and learn how it can be related to their everyday lives and experiences. Through lecture, class discussion, and exercises students will develop an understanding of the fascinating discipline of psychology.

350-BED-LE DISCOVERING PSYCHOLOGY THROUGH FILM (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Discovering Psychology Through Film is a complementary course intended to introduce psychological concepts to non Social Science students. Through the analysis of film and television students will discover psychological concepts and theories which they can then apply to their own lives. Students will be provided with enough background on an area of study in psychology to be able to discern the examples of these concepts as they come to life on screen. Students will be encouraged to examine these on screen portrayals with a critical eye to determine the extent to which they are being applied accurately and realistically. Through lecture, viewing films, class discussion, and exercises students will develop an understanding of the fascinating discipline of psychology, and more importantly, will learn how to apply what they have learned to their everyday lives.

385-BFB-LE THE POLITICS OF VIOLENCE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The foundation of politics is violence: controlling it to establish stately order, or unleashing it to contest the status quo. This course uses the prism of violence and its manifestations to introduce students to political concepts, approaches and ongoing issues. This course will provide an overview of democratic and authoritarian regimes, the two dominant poles of political organization. Revolutions, riots and rebellions are tools for contenders to establish or destroy such regimes. They are adequate vectors to discuss the dynamic of political violence, as well as its ultimate objective: political structures

387-BEC-LE SOCIOLOGY OF UNEQUAL RELATIONS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course sensitizes students to the different types of minorities that exist in Canadian society and promotes an understanding of these groups. The course also describes social inequality and explains the impact of social inequalities and minority groups standing on intergroup relations. Specific groups are studied to understand each one’s distinctiveness and possibly bury misconceptions. Lastly, the course describes and analyzes the challenges and adjustment problems which people face based on their perceived diferences and foster the coexistence and integration of people with differences.

CATEGORY 2: SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

105-BFB-LE FORENSIC SCIENCE (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Who might have taken your missing iPod? One of your roommates? Maybe the greasy fingerprints on your desk can help you. Do the bloody shoe impressions on O.J. Simpson's Bronco carpet match those worn by Simpson the night of the murder? In order to solve either of these mysteries you will have to use the knowledge of a crime scene investigator (CSI). What does a CSI do? This course will explore both theoretical and laboratory aspects of crime scene investigation. Covering topics such as the collection of evidence, examination of a body, toxicology, DNA matching and fingerprinting, the student will learn to apply the steps of the scientific method as a powerful tool to solve crimes. Designed for non-science students, curiosity, creativity, teamwork and an eye for detail are the main basic skills needed to be able to learn about forensic science.

203-BEA-03 ASTRONOMY (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of astronomy and astrophysics, as well as a rudimentary knowledge of observational astronomy. The presentation of the material is made in a way that restricts to a minimum the use of mathematics. Students will have the opportunity to get acquainted with the various astronomical objects found in the Universe through in-class activities and direct observations. The course emphasizes the notion that the Universe is in incessant evolution in its composition and structure.

203-BFA-03 RAINBOWS, LASERS, HOLOGRAMS AND OTHER VISUAL WONDERS (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course constitutes an introduction to the physical principles of optics and is designed for students who do not have a background in science and mathematics. The course allows students to explore the visual world which surrounds their everyday lives using the scientific method. Through demonstrations and simple labs, students investigate optical phenomena such as rainbows, sunsets, human vision, photography, lasers and holography. Students will have the opportunity to create their own hologram. The degree of emphasis to be placed upon any individual topic will be tailored to suit students’ interests.

320-BEB-LE NATURAL HAZARDS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The international media on almost any day reports on natural hazard occurrences whether it is near or far from us, in urban areas or remote locations. The fact is that most locations in the world are at some risk from what nature can produce, but what makes understanding the science of natural hazards so crucial is the fact that a significant proportion of the world’s population live in high risk areas.

354-BEA-LE BUILDING COLLEGE SKILLS (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is offered to new students entering CEGEP and to returning students who want to improve their academic skills by examining some aspect of a scientific or technological issue. It is designed to enable students to enhance their understanding of themselves as learners and to develop their skill set to support their academic studies using a project-oriented approach. Students will be given both theory and practical work to promote reflection, skill building, experiential learning, taking personal responsibility and action enabling them to become ACTIVE LEARNERS while developing a deeper understanding of how scientific and technological issues relate to their chosen program of study.

354-BFA-LE BECOMING AN ACTIVE LEARNER (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is offered to new students entering CEGEP in the Transition sessions and to returning students who want to improve their academic skills. It is designed to enable students to enhance their understanding of themselves as learners and to develop their skill set to support their academic studies using a process-oriented approach. Students will be given both theory and practical work to promote reflection, skill building, experiential learning, taking personal responsibility and action.

CATEGORY 3: MODERN LANGUAGE

607-BEA-03 ELEMENTARY SPANISH I (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course gives beginners the fundamental linguistic basis of the Spanish language. Basic grammar and vocabulary will be introduced to reinforce both oral and written skills. Greater emphasis will be on oral skills, particularly through the medium of conversation.

607-BFA-03 ELEMENTARY SPANISH II (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is a continuation of Elementary Spanish I, 607-BEA-03. It is designed for those who have some basic knowledge of the language. Students will have the opportunity to improve their conversational, reading, and writing skills.

(Prerequisite: 607-BEA-03 or equivalent)

609-BEA-03 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The focus of this course is on the acquisition of the four basic language skills—listening, speaking, reading and writing, through dialogues, role-playing, exercises, computer and language laboratory assignments, as well as oral and written assignments. Students will also be introduced to contemporary life in German-speaking countries.

613-BEA-LE INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Students will acquire basic knowledge about Chinese word structure, sentence structure, the Pinyin, Chinese characters, and some aspects about Chinese culture. At the end of the semester, students will be able to exchange simple oral messages about daily life.

CATEGORY 4: MATHEMATIC LITERACY AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

420-BED-LE MULTIMEDIA (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will introduce students to the field of multimedia including animations, creating web pages and sites. Integrating pictures, sounds, graphics will be covered using Adobe’s Creative Cloud. Students will learn how to develop compelling interactive applications that include animation, sound and video. Students will also use their imagination to create an interactive animation along with your very own mini animation movie. This course does not require any artistic talent and is open to all students.

420-BFM-LE COMPUTER SKILLS FOR COMMERCE (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will provide students the skills needed to efficiently use office software during the course of their studies and beyond. Students will learn Microsoft Word, Excel and Access, with an emphasis on commerce related skills. A good knowledge of Excel is a must in today’s job market and students will learn to create spreadsheets, use formulas, statistical and financial functions, create graphs and much more. These skills will be useful for other courses and their future career. Also covered is Access as an introduction to databases and information management.

420-BFR-LE COMPUTER SKILLS FOR SCIENCE (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will provide students the skills needed to efficiently use office software during the course of their studies and beyond. Students will learn Microsoft Word (including the Chemistry add-in), Math tool and Excel with an emphasis on science related skills. Students will learn to create spreadsheets, use formulas, create graphs and much more. Access, useful for manipulating large amount of data, is also covered.

420-BFS-LE COMPUTER SKILLS FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course will provide students the skills needed to efficiently use office software during their studies and beyond. Students will learn Microsoft Word and Excel with an emphasis on social science related skills. A good knowledge of Excel is a must in today’s job market and students will learn to create spreadsheets, use formulas and statistical functions, create graphs and much more. These skills will be useful for other courses and their future career. Also covered is Publisher and PowerPoint.

CATEGORY 5: ART AND AESTHETICS

510-BFA-03 PAINTING (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This studio course is an introduction to the painting process: sketching, composition, colour mixing and paint application. Students will examine diverse approaches to painting. Classes combine technical workshops, class discussions with individual and group critiques.

510-BFB-03 SCULPTURE (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is an introduction to sculpture, using both traditional and non-traditional three-dimensional materials. It will offer students the ability to develop an awareness of the elements and principles of three-dimensional art. Introduction to sculpture will emphasize conceptual reasoning and the consideration of the choice of material, craft, form, space, site, presentation and context. Students will gain an understanding of the terminology, concepts and technical processes of sculpture through this introductory level course where their skills to modeling and assemblage will be emphasized.

510-BFD-LE DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

This course is a "hands on" introduction to digital photography. Through a series of assignments students will learn the fundamentals of the medium. Students will learn how to operate the digital camera manually and explore compositional and design choices. Students will use photographic software for processing and displaying images.

510-BFE-LE INTRODUCTION TO DRAWING (1-2-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Students will explore drawing using a variety of media and techniques. Emphasis will be placed on drawing from observation, composition and the development of eye-hand coordination. This course aims at helping students develop their drawing skills and can possibly help them to build a portfolio for university programs such as Design and Architecture.

520-BEE-LE ART HISTORY BASICS (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Students will learn the basics of understanding works of art as a survey of art works (highlights from Antiquity to 1850/today will be discussed). Students will learn to use correct terminology relevant to art history, as they learn to research and learn to read a work of art using different approaches. Students need to gain an awareness of the development of art and art history. It contextualizes the making of works of art within societal, ideological (philosophical), and historical developments in Western Art. It aids students to relate contemporary social and historical ideas and contexts to their own studio practice. Intertextuality with an awareness of the time periods will be introduced through lectures and demonstrations. An introduction of post-1850 to contemporary art will be elaborated along with the discussion of the works of art surveyed in this course. Upon completing this course, students will demonstrate their accurate reading of works of art within context.

530-BEA-03 FILM STUDY (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The aim of this course is to help the student develop from a passive moviegoer into a critically aware film viewer, through a program of films which will correspond as much as possible to the material in the textbook. The student, with the help of texts, lectures and discussions, is expected to become familiar with the grammar and techniques used by film-makers, as well as with the vocabulary of film criticism. Evaluation is based on the student’s Journal, in which are recorded reviews of films.

550-BEA-03 MUSIC APPRECIATION (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

The appreciation of music requires above all the ability to listen to music comprehensively, and actively, and as such this course focuses on creating informed listeners. It will provide students with the necessary foundations on which to base their analyses of musical works. Students will acquire the basic terminology with which to discuss musical works, learn to distinguish between the music of different historical periods, and learn how to comment on and analyze a musical work using established analytical frameworks.

550-BFB-03 MUSIC DOSSIER (3-0-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Music Dossier is a complementary music performance course offered by the department of Arts, Literature, and Communication. This course introduces students to music performance through individual and ensemble rehearsals and workshops. All students sing in the large choral ensemble, while select students will receive training on their individual instrument of specialization (usually voice, guitar, bass, drums, or piano). At the end of the semester, the students will put on a professional music show.

CATEGORY 6: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES

310-BEE-LE (365-BEE-LE) INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Introduction to Criminology is a complementary course which serves as an introduction to the field of criminology. This course is offered to all students and focuses on three areas: 1) the development of criminology as multidisciplinary field of study and its multiple perspectives and methods; 2) the various theories that have been presented to explain criminal behaviour and the analysis of the place and definitions of crime in society; 3) the relationships between crime and different institutions and systems (among others, the criminal justice system). More particularly, students in the criminology program will benefit from this course as introduces concepts that will be useful for their criminology courses in specific disciplines (psychology, history, political science and sociology).

320-BEF-LE (365-BEF-LE) MAPPING MY WORLD (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology provides a powerful tool for spatial analysis in almost any discipline. GIS is a computer-based tool used to map and analyse large volumes of data. Maps provide a global look at complex social issues, such as crime, politics, environmental hazards, and development, which allow for a clear assessment of concentration, distribution, movement, proximity and the relationship between phenomena.

340-BEA-LE (365-BEA-LE) AWAKENING TO THE WORLD: APPROACHES TO EASTERN THOUGHT (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

During the 20th century, dynamic movements categorized as "engaged Buddhism" have provided vivid demonstrations of the peaceful orientation inherent to the Buddhist tradition. For example, political activist Aung san suu Kyi has successfully applied key Buddhist ideas to wage a non-violent struggle for Burmese rights. This complementary course starts from the assumption that ideas from the Eastern traditions can teach us important lessons in understanding and responding to contemporary issues such as wars, human and animal rights, human suffering, and environmental degradation. We will therefore seek to understand key ideas from Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism with a question in mind: How can these traditions help us awaken to our world?

340-BEC-LE (365-BEC-LE) THE CREATIVE I (2-1-3) 45 HRS / 2 CR

Western society has recently problematised creativity and promoted it as a defining quality in modern work, politics and social discourse. There is a large and growing number of communication services, publications, and platforms that invite all citizens to participate in cultural production via individual and group contributions towards identity, commentary, advocacy and expression. A thoughtful, prepared citizen in this newly participative world will be one who knows how to navigate discourses of creativity, and to confidently apply their own creative skills to everyday life and work. It is often assumed to be the sole province of those in artistic vocations, but creativity is a skill that everyone can develop. By the end of this course, students will have developed their own skills in order to become creative in their own right, in ways that are applicable to daily life.

NOTE: SOME COURSE TITLES MAY DIFFER SLIGHTLY ON STUDENTS' TRANSCRIPTS; PLEASE REFER TO COURSE NUMBERS.


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